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7

Me parece que te estás complicando demasiado, puesto que la palabra "presidente" sólo puede acompañar al sujeto como adjetivo. Así pues, esta frase significa que es "el pueblo" el que preside, es decir, el que gobierna y es depositario del poder.


5

It is an offensive word in some countries like Honduras and you should avoid using it. However in Nicaragua it is slang for a way to refer to a person, if you want to translate it to English it would probably be "dude".


4

To be honest I never thought about it. It has been so natural to be saying "de donde fue"...our population has been saying that for decades. We had a big major earthquake in 1972 that destroy most of our city. So people started to have those type of references. To complicate more the things we do not have street names which can be very confused. We use ...


4

When I lived in Nicaragua I learned how to make repocheta. From what everyone's saying I'm going to assume it is a Nicaraguan recipe. It seems that no one has heard of it outside of Nica. You would cook up a batch of red beans (I always put a clove or two of garlic in mine). Then you would blend them up with a couple of bell peppers, tomatoes, and an ...


3

I'm not from Nicaragua, but "De donde fue" sounds like something unique to Nicaragua. Here in Chile, we say "De aquí, 3 cuadras hacia ..." and "Desde el estadio, 3 cuadras hacia..." UPDATE If you're refering to something that was there but does not longer exists, that's more rare, but you could expres it as Donde estaba el estadio, 3 cuadras hacia ... ...


3

Being from Nicaragua that means that you agree to do something, use something or agree with someone (sometimes after a discussion when someone has convinced you). A common example: Question: Quieres ir al cine? (would you like to see a movie) answer: dale pues.. (ok) Nicaraguans tend not to pronounce the (s) so you might only hear: dale pue... Also ...


2

I am not sure if repochetas is just for Nicaragua. I never heard any other country from centra america that they made repochetas. Repochetas at home we made it with beans, cheese (not the cheese from US) and cabagge salad. Cheese from central america is very different from other regions. Repochetas can have different styles like those that jrdioko ...


2

Maje in Nicaragua means something like dude in English...it is used mainly between friends. Women tend to use it less. It is not considered to be offensive but you should not use it in formal meetings or with someone you don't know very well. Rafael is right maybe in another countries might be offensive. But I don't think it would be a big deal to use it in ...


2

I never heard it in Spain. We use: Pablo la lleva Pablo la tiene Pablo (se) la queda (just in the moment he has started to be it) This game is also known in some countries as "la anda" (probably in Nicaragua) and they say "la anda" for "to be it". Maybe you misunderstood "Pablo se landa" and they really had said "Pablo se la anda".


2

According to the Diccionario del Español de Nicaragua published by the Academia Nicaragüense de La Lengua (I have a printed copy, I can't find it online), it's a type of food consisting of fried tortilla with beans and cheese along with cabbage salad, onion, sour cream, ketchup, and vinegar: repocheta. f. Tortilla frita acompañada de frijoles y queso, ...


2

It means let's do it and is commonly used before you are going to use or do something.


2

In Nicaragua we use the word chepa as slang for someone who's always getting into other's business to get gossip. "No seás chepa, dejá de meterte en mis cosas." "Don't be a chepa, stop getting in my stuff."


2

According to the Diccionario del Español de Nicaragua (Dictionary of Nicaraguan Spanish) published by the Academia Nicaragüense de la Lengua, pinolero is an adjective (also used as a noun) used to refer to Nicaraguans, "por su hábito de beber pinol" (because of their habit of drinking pinol). The entry above explains that pinol (a drink made from toasted, ...


1

I am Nicaraguan. A repocheta is a torilla filled with queso fresco and deep fried. All the beans and other stuff are just how they're served.


1

El Abate es una marca comercial de un insecticida, específicamente un larvicida, utilizado para disminuir la población de mosquitos, en particular de los géneros que funcionan como vectores para enfermedades que afectan a humanos. Es utilizado en México de forma regular en las zonas infestadas con Dengue, donde se mezcla con agua y se rocía en aerosol en ...


1

In Costa Rica, mae is a "crutch" word used at the end of a lot of sentences. Similar to the vos used elsewhere in Latin America. Qué fue lo que dijiste, mae? Mae, yo sé, mae. It can mean "you", but it's also used as an interjection, to "complete" a sentence. Definitely slang, but used heavily.


1

I would say is a slang from Nicaragua, I would describe that usage as a solecism , it happen with every language and in every country, as a matter of fact the usage of "de donde estaba" doesn't seem quite correct either UNLESS the place you are referring is not there anymore.


1

It's like saying, "Ok then, do it". It's a goading phrase as well. My wife says it to me all the time, especially when she's not happy.


1

In Spain chepa means joroba (hump) or, according to RAE, jorobado (humpback). It is believed by some that humps provide good luck, and so they rub lottery tickets on people's humps. I guess that's why in Colombia it means "good luck".


1

Just that it's a corn tortilla with cream and cheese, and as far as I can find out, only ever appears on Nicaraguan sites / recipes. An example recipe for it is available online too, if you wish to reminisce ;)


1

chepa. f. coloq. Corcova, joroba. f. Col. Suerte favorable. m. jorobado. U. t. c. adj. This is the actual definition for "chepa", but the most used in America is Hispanic good luck the second



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