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20

Usted comes from Vuestra Merced (later Vuesarced), meaning "Your Grace". Since this was an indirect way of addressing someone, it was inflected in the third person. That is, strictly speaking, you are not addressing the person, but "Their Grace". As time went on, the person inflection was kept, even though its origins became opaque. In a study entitled El ...


7

When you say, Light went out, translated to spanish is Se fue la luz and means there were a cut in the energy system, it is se fue because there is no energy, in Spanish luz and light means both electricity and light. Lights went out literally translated is Se fueron las luces, fueron has to be plural too. This translation sounds a little bit weird in in ...


6

The most common word is 'pantalones' (plural) and 'pantalón' (singular). Other types of pants are specified using adjectives: "shorts" will be "pantalones cortos" and jeans "pantalones vaqueros" (also valid in their singular forms). As in English, you can use the plural form to refer to one item, and you can also use the singular form. Both forms are ok and ...


6

En tu primer ejemplo, sería correcto el uso del verbo en segunda persona plural, siendo esta flexión o son o sois según región. Es fácil verificarlo porque al cambiar la posición del verbo y sujeto no creo que quepa duda de la forma correcta: Tú y los demás sois/son guapos. Sois/Son guapos tú y los demás. Es así porque se contempla como un sujeto ...


3

In Argentina it's used in both ways: Pasame el pantalón. Ponete los pantalones (referring to the pair). ¿Dónde pusiste el pantalón? ¿Dónde pusiste los pantalones? IMO par de pantalones is starting to get deprecated is normal speech (it takes too long to pronounce), while pantalones can refer to the same pair of pants with much less ...


3

"Vostede" (galego) & "vusté" (català) & "você" (português) all come from the same medieval expression "vo(ue)stra/vossa merced(e)/mercê," as it was customary in the Middle ages to speak to those with titles, honors or age in the third person (your honor, your highness, your grace). "Vos" is original to Latin (vous in French & voi in Italian) ...


3

Luz has of course a plural. Mind that the verb tense is correct in "se fue las luces", but you need to use fueron, 3rd form of plural, instead on the 3rd form of singular fue. Se fue la luz (or la X), pero (ella) ya volverá. Third person singular Se fueron las luces (or las XXXs), pero (ellas) ya volverán. Third person plural One of the reasons ...


3

"Cualquiera" can work as an determinative adjective (used with a noun) or as a pronoun. In this site it is explained its use as a determinative: Cualquier It is the singular form and it appears before the noun, which can be both masculine and feminine: Coje cualquier libro Lee cualquier página Cualquiera It is the singular form and it appears ...


2

Coincidentally, this morning I found this article that relates to this question. I will post the part of the article that relates to this question and link the source. El Diccionario panhispánico de dudas registra la palabra chor (plural, chores) como sustantivo masculino usado en Estados Unidos, Honduras, España, Costa Rica, República Dominicana y ...


2

"Who is the third who walks always beside you?" (T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land, line 359). The redoubtable and relentlessly ingenious Luigi Barzini's answer is the most precise, vivid, and memorable: "The very form of address, the third person singular, is also a Spanish left-over. It is a conventional way of talking not to a man but to his aura, so to ...


1

Yes, but not usually when we want to refer to electic power. When I think of "luces" I think of the lights they put on stages at concerts or venues. "Se fueron las luces" gives me the feeling that the lights moved out of sight, while "se apagaron las luces" means they were turned off. Note that we also say "se fue la luz" when we want to say that there's a ...



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