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16

"A la orden" is a military phrase meaning "At your command", used to express the willing to serve to an official. From there, the phrase slipped into the non-military language with almost the same meaning: the willing to make something requested by somebody you care about: a boss, a client, a friend or a relative.


7

Ser equis tiene su origen en ser x en el sentido algebraico: una incógnita, o algo que podría tomar cualquier valor, en otras palabras, algo desconocido. Es decir, ser equis denota ausencia de popularidad o mediocridad, es lo mismo que ser gris, no sobresalir y no ser importante, o como @JoseMaria dice, dos dos o dos tres (ni excelente ni malo). En el ...


7

In Uruguay and Argentina and also Spain the more accurate translation of shit happens would be the expression: "son cosas que pasan" and most of the time the "son" word is omitted and you just say: "cosas que pasan" (although in Spain it's more common not to omit it). Another similar expression to express this but that isn't as accurate (can have a slightly ...


5

I'm Mexican and we never use pinche as Kitchen boy, though some Mexicans would know it also means chef's helper. We always use it as an insult enhancer and can turn almost any curse word into a really rude one: pinche pendejo/pendeja = fucking asshole pinche puto/puta = fucking faggot/whore pinche culero = fucking asshole When used alone as an adjective ...


5

Rewording it in English can give you clues. For example, when work refers to ability-to-function, the verb funcionar percolates to the mind's surface. El televisor ya no funciona. No funciona mi coche. Another version of work in English is, for instance, this doesn't work for me, as in not appropriate or doesn't serve me well. The latter one gives ...


5

In México means something like "at your service" or "at your command".


5

I would go with something like : Lamento avisarte con tan poca antelación. Lamento avisarte con tan poco tiempo. Lamento avisarte de esto con tan poco margen.


5

First of all, the expression is not specific of Puerto Rico. It is widely used in most (if not all) Spanish speaking countries. As to why it is used so frequently, once again it is not specific of this expression. It is a cultural feature. In Spanish speaking countries it is more usual to greet strangers than in other countries. If I meet someone in the ...


5

Creo que esa frase no tiene ningún significado entre líneas, aunque obviamente la oración completa es un "sinsentido" en la vida real porque un corazón no puede salirse del pecho, etc., la frase le duele el pecho no me parece que necesite algún tipo de aclaración o traducción especial, si no, simplemente "His chest hurts" porque creo que en inglés y en ...


4

No son sinonimas. Puede parecer que ambas expresan decepcion, desencanto o mala opinion acerca de alguien, pero mientras que esto es casi siempre asi con la segunda forma, no siempre lo es con la primera. Mi amigo Juan fue el unico que se quedo conmigo a limpiar despues de la fiesta. Eso dice mucho de él. "Eso dice mucho de él" puede usarse tambien ...


4

Expresión or frase is correct for these 3 examples, there is not an idiom or phrasal verb in Spanish. Looking on internet I have seen many examples but with an adjective before: a vivid turn of phrase >> una frase deslumbrante a homely turn of phrase >> una frase coloquial / una expresión coloquial linguee.es she has a picturesque turn of ...


4

The man is working. -- El hombre está trabajando. It is broken. No funciona (meaning "está averiado") This is not working. -- Esto no está funcionando / esto no está dando resultado (as in "este plan no está funcionando) A working prototype. -- Un prototipo funcional


4

It's not the second person singular form of the verb comprar, it's the plural form of the noun compra (purchase), though that ultimately derives from the been comprar. Many nouns in Spanish derive from present tense forms of verbs, but then follow noun gender and number rules.


3

In Guatemala it's mostly used as a way to thank and denote that the speaker is willing to help either by doing or facilitating something. Examples: Guatemalan Spanish A: ¡Felicidades por tu nuevo carro! B: ¡A la orden! English A: Congratulations on your new car! B: Thanks! Whenever you need it just let me know. Guatemalan Spanish ...


3

Here we go. If I understand correctly your question, you will be happy with the 200+ entries you could find in Wikipedia, False friends between Spanish and English. I think that's the objective part of the question that can be answered. Unfortunately, I don't know which of them you'd find funny, so is upto you to select them. Enjoy!


3

Yo soy la más chica de 7 hermanos y de ellos aprendí esto para ser el primero en algún juego o en algún evento familiar (lo aplicábamos para todo), y según sé es: Mano, Cutimano, Anticutimano, Anticutimano Coronita de Dios (y ahí sí no hay quien te gane)


3

Extraído de cronicasvenezuela Uno de los insultos más populares que divulgó, el ya habitante del más allá, Hugo Chávez, fue el de “escuálido”, que en una acepción significa flaco, macilento, asqueroso, pero en otra acepción constituye el orden de los peces escualos, grandes depredadores temidos hasta por el hombre. Rápidamente, en algunos mitines o ...


3

No, it is not what you think. Your phrase would say we are not going straight to what is the center of the question; when "A ver, con matices" is a way to say that what we are saying, is not exact and we have to observe differences between similar things. You use that phrase when you want to warn the listener in not using whatever you are saying in a ...


3

Aquí no se habla de "cantar" en primera persona sino de un canto, que es un trozo de piedra y se refiere generalmente a la terminación de ésta: si es redonda o tallada. Cerrado a cal y canto es una frase que viene de la españa antigua: cuando sellaban las puertas de una casa para que nadie entrara, las cerraban con piedras y una mezcla de cal; por eso ...


2

A slice of the entire explanation in English. Is due to the invasion suffered on Spain by many centuries. In Arabic cultures is quite common to use it and I think they use it in other situations, after the reconquest the Catholic Monarchs tried to eradicate without success and so extended to America. It is globally used in any Spanish-spoken country. ...


2

It's very difficult to make a translation without any context or even a full sentence. Let's imagine the sentence in English was: He'd planned to speak his piece at the next meeting. then a translation into Spanish could be: Había planeado hablar sin reservas en la próxima reunión.


2

There is a debate if the correct phrase is "Speak one's piece" or "Speak one's peace". I have no intentions to go into details here, so I'm going to assume they are equivalent, or otherwise as explained here. From Modismos Ingleses Para Hispanos/English Idioms For Spanish Speakers (2007), it's actually quite straight forward: Decir todo lo que se tiene ...


2

Colombia: Hay una delgada línea entre X y Y. De X a Y solo hay un paso.


2

In addition to Diego's answer, some related idiomatic expressions (at least in Argentina) are "sobre la hora" and "a último momento".


2

Lento pero seguro conveys a very similar meaning to Slow and steady wins the race. because it is used to express that slowness is a good thing and gets you to your targets. Example: - estas tardando mucho, ¿no? - yo voy lento pero seguro That is widely accepted and recognized (at least in Spain).


2

In Spain it is not used Ni modo. Some good uses would be No importa, No pasa nada, Da igual, Es lo mismo and Lo mismo da.


2

The meaning is: "Espero que (lo que vas a comer) te sea de buen provecho." In many languages, when a sentence is uncomplete, it's usually a expression of (good) wish, like the salutions: (I whish you to have a) good day. And what you say, it's not a language issue, but a cultural one. In many countries, you should express a "buen provecho" to someone ...


1

Colombia: at your service, what can I do for you. Used in the context of servicing someone, in a restaurant, in a store.


1

In Colombia, it's not common translate the "Shit happens" expression literally. As complement to datelligent's answer you may notice that Sh** word isn't used in translated expression. The most adequate translations can be: Esas cosas pasan. / Esas cosas suceden.


1

Aquí están las opciones: It is broken. (As in, "It doesn't work."): Está dañado. Broken implies that it is broken so "dañado" can mean that is damagged. This is not working. (As in, "I am having problems."): Esto no está funcionando. This is not working. Esto no está trabajando. This is not workig [an engine or something mechanical]. A ...



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