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It can also be used as the word beautiful.. lovely... sexy... so on.


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You are referring to a very colloquial, regional, and sometimes vulgar expression. A huevos! (Sí) A puro huevo! (A la fuerza u obligado) Huevos! (Mejor no!) Estar de a huevos! (Estar alguien bien en Guatemala, o mal en Cuba) Hacer algo a huevo (obligado o a la fuerza) Ser alguien de a huevo (ser valiente) Ahuevado (avergonzado, indolente, aburrido, depende ...


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According to some references, it does indeed has to do with testicles. It seems that the meaning of this expression in Mexico is "por la fuerza". In Spanish, saying that someone has "balls" means that is brave, bold, or has courage (in English too, right?). According to this reference, En México poner a huevo significa hacerlo a fuerzas (p. ej. "No ...


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Here in Argentina, same as @Rodrigo said about Chile. Media (for men, women, or unisex) Specific for women kind of "media": Media de nylon, pantimedia, etc. Calza for women, unless otherwise said: calza deportiva para hombres.


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It... Kind of depends on the country. Here in Peru it's always "lentes", "lentes de sol". I think that in Mexico they call them "anteojos".


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Spain usage: The word pecho can be considered an exact equivalent of the English breast; you can use it uncountably (the front part of your thorax) or countably (women have two of them). It is a neutral word and can be used safely in any context. To breastfeed also translates as dar el pecho. Seno can have several meanings. It can be your lap, a woman's ...


4

Indeed they do all refer to the same thing, but you are right, they do all have different connotations. Seno - Cleavage The space between the breasts; The space between the chest and a woman's shirt. Seno refers to this area, and you might possibly bring it up when a woman grabs her wallet from inside her shirt; or change, a cellphone, tampons, ...


1

In Spain we uses gafas for seeing glasses, sunglasses and even googles and the like (gafas de bucear). If you are putting them in your face, they are called gafas. Lente (in singular) can be used for each one of the glasses that are part of an optic instrument, such a telescope. Although lentes in plural, could be understood as a word used to refer to ...


1

In Spain is much more common to hear cremallera. You could use cierre and people would still understand you, provided that there is enough context Se me ha enganchado el cierre. Actually, the definition of creamallera is el cierre que se aplica a una abertura longitudinal cierre en prendas de vestir o bolsos. which implies that other pieces of ...


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Cierre is an easier, lazier way to refer to zipper. It literally means close; a conjugation of to close. Cremallera is actually a zipper, the mechanism use to join openings in fabrics.


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Four different words, same meaning. Wrong. Although, they all refer to the same idea, they differ in they're exact meaning. Gafas Something that covers your eyes, spectacles, safety goggles, sunglasses... Lentes Lenses, literally. Anteojos fore eyes most literally. Refers to the object and the shape we often imagine when we hear someone say ...


3

Antojarse is of the olvidarse/perderse group of reflexive verbs where the subject is at fault. The subject of the sentence is the desire. It is an overwhelming, enveloping, or even possibly a far-fetched way to express a desire. It is a desire that occurs, that affects, that comes over you. When it's cold, you often feel like putting on a jacket. When ...


2

En España se usa mayoritariamente «gafas». «Lentes» se usa cuando se quiere referir a las piezas individuales de cristal u otros materiales, y «Lentes de contacto» o «lentillas» cuando se colocan directamente en el globo ocular.


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En Chile: Las gafas se usan para proteger los ojos. La mayoría de las veces son de vidrios oscuros para atenuar el brillo del sol. Algunas pocas veces se refiere a los accesorios de trabajo, que también se llaman antiparras o protectores. Generalmente no distorsionan la imagen. Los anteojos son las estructuras de metal o plástico que se ponen frente a los ...


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En argentina, es muy raro decir gafas. No me malinterpreten, no está mal pero seguramente carguen por eso. Entre lentes y anteojos es casi indistinto. Jamás en mi vida escuché espejuelos


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En primer lugar, no queda claro si lo que estás queriendo es traducir del inglés al español o del español al inglés. En particular no pensaría que la traducción directa de "tener ganas de" es "feels like". En mi opinión, feels like se relaciona mucho más con lo sensorial mientras que "tener ganas de" está en otro plano que lo relaciono más con el querer. Por ...


0

Yo personalmente creo que viene de los dos orar u ahora, es depende como lo utilices al conjugarlo resulta identico, pero es como se utiliza en la frase completa..por ejemplo: tienes qu orarle a dios...yo porque? Orale tu,orale andale. Ora imperativo dd verbo orar. Ora tu que te traes, ahi viene de ahora. Los chicanos lo utilizan solo en imperativo de verbo ...


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So, we knew that the Wiktionary explained what a chándal is in castilian Spanish, and gave a couple of synonyms for other countries that have been validated by some users in the comments (such as buzo in Chile). I found a Mexican online clothing store and tried, successfully, to find a chándal. Interestingly, they use chamarra to designate the upper part of ...


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In Chile, "medias" has two meanings. The first is not important in this question, is the sport socks, used by both sexes. With a minimal difference are the same as "calcetas". The second "medias" refers to a type of lingerie, only wear by women. Is a set of panties with legs and which must necessarily be closed on the feet. That is: a trouser with socks, ...


3

I'm from Colombia (Bogotá D.C) and I only know that calzas are a short term for calzas dentales: Below, a example: ¿Tiene cita odontológica? Si, vengo a que me pongan unas calzas. Searching a little on internet, the word also be applicable to socks, however I only use the word medias.


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I was hesitating about posting an answer because you are asking for the usage in Mexico specifically, and my Spanish is castilian, but in case it helps and until you get a better and more complete answer... My understanding is that 'calcetines' is what we use in a daily basis and 'calzas' would designate larger 'socks', like the ones soccer players (among ...



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