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0

Soy del sur de México y se usa como sinónimo de valiente.


-1

Se dice: "Se me ha pasado rápido"


0

Según el DRAE, en la América Central y el Méjico, hasta también tiene el significado de no antes de. En este contexto, cabe tal acepción porque sería como si dijésemos No antes de que tomé la píldora, se me quitó el dolor (que bueno, así para mi suena mejor en reverso se me quitó el dolor no antes de que tomé la píldora pero no cambia su sentido) ...


1

It personally feels very natural to leave the not out. I'd probably use that version most of the time. Had I never read this question, I would've thought it was perfectly standard to do so. Also, this could be a regional thing, but I would translate by the time as: Para cuando Your sentence would end up being Para cuando me tomé la píldora, ya se ...


2

"by the time" really means that the first event already happened when the second event took place. Using the OPs example: "by the time we called the police she was driving away" means "cuando llamamos a la policía, ella ya se iba". Unfortunately, my translation does not use any idiomatic flavor, which I think is what the OP is really looking for. If "Hasta ...


0

In San Jose California on San Carlos ave there is a taco stand called Tacomania. Underneath that sign it says Que Pinches Tacos! That's a compliment right?


0

The vocabulary, that's the main difference between books written in spanish. If the book doesn't have dialogues it hard to tell the origin, but as I said, the vocabulary tells a lot of information but you have to know where those words are used. In Spain computers are "Ordenador" and in America is "Computadora" or "Computador" depending on the country. ...


0

Really good insight. From the many English teachers I have had, only one explained to me that center and centre are the same word, none is misspelled, there is just regional variations (as with the meaning of smart). He explained us to pay attention about what influences you have in the English you are studying, reading and hearing while learning English. ...


5

First thing, there is not such thing as Latin American Spanish as a single variety. In fact, the quality you mention, vosotros is pretty much the only thing that is done in Spain and Africa that's not done anywhere in Latin America. For instruction manuals, this will never be an issue, as they will either use impersonal infinitival commands, or they will ...


3

An aljibe is an underground tank where you save water. Is is usually human made, mostly used in the past or in areas without runnin water (comming through pipes, I mean), to gather water from rain. In cities there were big aljibes filled up with water from the nearby rivers usefull for droughts and sieges. Some country houses nowadays have aljibes that are ...


3

This flower in Mexico is called Cempasúchil, Cempasúchitl is the nahuatl name. If there are other names, I've never heard them before, I didin't know that was called maravilla in Spain. Words written with final "tl" have two options of pronounciation: -tl: yes, hard to pronounce. and -l: just an l or lt, but in this case only for extremely common ...



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