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6

The problem with translating phrases like this are that they are poetic, not idiomatic. Saying "dame tu luz" isn't an idiom, but a poetic saying. With that in mind, we have to interpret what the artist is trying to say. If we look at the lyrics to the song, we see from the first verse that the singer is looking at "pequño amor" as a star. In this case, ...


5

I don't know the song, but the translation of that sentence should simply be: give me your light It's not "give me birth/give birth to me", because in that case it should be "dame la luz", for example. Remember that like él (personal pronoun) and el (masculine singular article), also tú (personal pronoun) and tu (possessive pronoun) has a subtle ...


3

Don't trust song lyrics since many times they are not grammatically correct. They just try to fix themselves to the melody. If you check the lyrics first he says the sentence twice but in both ways: No importa qué diga el destino We don't know yet what it has said. (Subjunctive for supposition), and it doesn't matter what Fate can say. No me ...


2

Camínalo, rompe el cajón, saca los cuadros, camínalo


2

Me la paso pensándote This is more like a figure of speech. A rather pseudo figure of speech IMO. Now, me refers to the person aforementioned. In the song he is already talking about himself before so he can refer to himself again by only using Me. La is the singular feminine of a thing. This means that it refers to something that I am talking about, ...


1

The biggest problem in translating Spanish to English is that the two languages are too dissimilar to always make use of direct translations, so I will try to explain the heartfelt meaning of the translations. Pequeños amor, por siempre tu. Pequeño amor, dame tu luz. Small love you forever. Little love, give me your light. This song ...



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