Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

Sorry, I don't speak English Es una duplicación del complemento directo. En español culto, cuando el complemento directo o indirecto se antepone al verbo y no es un pronombre, entonces es obligatorio añadir el pronombre átono también antepuesto al verbo. La tarta la llevo yo. (yo llevo la tarta). La tarta no la llevo yo. (yo no llevo la tarta) ...


8

It's a pronoun, being used to refer to actions, concepts and ideas, never for nouns, which require the use of "El que...". Check this page for more examples. Consider the sentence: Lo que necesitamos es más tiempo. In English it would be "What we need is more time" (Translation might seem clumsy, but it's to allow you to understand); "what" refers to ...


7

La could work, if what you're doing is something feminine (like la tarea). Lo is used when what you're doing is masculine (like el trabajo). If what you're doing has no gender because it's a verb or can't be reduced to some noun (like ir de compras) you use the other lo. It's neuter, even though it looks identical. In this case, the neuter lo is the ...


6

They can go "hooked" to the verb when the verb is in imperative, infinitive or gerund. ¿por qué no puede hacerlo así? / ¿por qué no lo puede hacer así? ¿por qué no están haciéndolo así? / ¿por qué no lo están haciendo así? Hazlo así. In the other verb tenses the pronouns can't go hooked. In "¿por qué no lo hace?" the verb tense is neither ...


5

Because it's an adjective. It's not a person or thing; it's the quality of being reading at the moment or having the habit of reading, which you can apply to things o people, as in, I don't know, "el topo lector" (= "el topo que lee"). This is how adjectives are defined. You can't say that rojo, for example, means "lo de color encarnado", because you would ...


4

When the verb contains an infinitive form (plain verb, not modified by conjugation), it is equally valid to place the direct object pronoun (me, lo) at the end of the infinitive verb, or before the verb. Can you do it? ¿Puedes hacerlo? ¿Lo puedes hacer? But when the verb is conjugated, the direct object pronoun is separated and put in front of the verb. ...


4

There is no difference in meaning. The verbs ayudar and obedecer are changing their patterns. Historically (in medieval Spanish) they would take a dative pronoun (le); nowadays they take mostly an accusative one (la/lo). See: DPD, “Leísmo”, sección 4e


4

I think you are talking about "objeto directo & objeto indirecto" ("complemento directo & complemento indirecto"). As an example: (Yo) Le di un regalo a Alberto / I gave a present to Alberto Yo le di un regalo / I gave him a present (you know who) Yo se lo di / I gave it to him (you know who and what you gave) Another one: Ella ...


4

I would say it replaces el tiempo (time) or equivalent, as pasarlo bien == pasar bien el tiempo


3

The rules themselves are quite complicated especially taking into account dialectal concerns in the north of Spain where due to influence from other languages like Asturian can affect regional speech (and isn't strictly considered incorrect modern Spanish, though it will certainly sound old fashioned to everyone else). That said, I can give two sets of ...


3

Your question is a bit general but you have a nice table on the RAE website that can help you: RAE:pronombres atonos So for the third person you have: Complemento directo masculino singular: lo/(le(leísmo)) Complemento directo masculino plural: los Complemento directo femenino singular: la Complemento directo femenino plural: la Complemento directo ...


2

"Lo que" indeed means "what", not in the interrogative sense, but in the sense of "that which..." Consider the following examples: Lo que importa es... / What matters is... Lo que me molesta es que ... / What bothers me is that... ¿Oíste lo que dijo? / Did you hear what s/he said? Haz lo que quieras. / Do whatever you want. Pase lo ...


1

Both of your options are correct and perfectly acceptable. You should translate demonstrative pronouns as they are: (D.P.) Can you hold this for me? => ¿Me puedes sostener esto? (D.P.) Can you hold that for me? => ¿Me puedes sostener eso? (D.O.) Can you hold it for me? => ¿Me lo puedes sostener? In short: There's no need to change demonstrative ...


1

They go hooked to the verb when is in Imperative Infinitive Present Participle ¿por qué no puede hacerlo así? ¿por qué no puede comprenderme? ¿por qué no puede haciendo lo así? Estoy comprándotelo If our sentence involves an affirmative command, we must attached our pronouns to end of the verb. If negative, place before verb. If the ...


1

Indeed, there are rules, but it is important to distinguish between the rules that govern Standard Spanish (which should be used in formal communication) and informal or dialectal Spanish — which still have rules, just different from the standard. In general, the following table explains when to use each of the object pronouns in third person: ...


1

The answer from guifa is very good. Please notice that in several regions of Spain people uses this forms in the wrong way. It's a phenomena known as "leísmo" when they use le form instead of lo/la and "laísmo" when they use lo/la instead of le. As far as I know, it does not happens on south america.


1

In Standard Spanish, there is generally no distinction made in animacy for the object pronouns1. Lo and la are used for direct objects, being lo for masculine2 and la feminine. Le is used for indirect objects3 and represents the recipient of an action. This sentence is a bit tricky, because the verb doesn't correlate in transivity to English. Let's try ...


1

As far as I can see, the lo is simply being used expressively to emphasize the speaker's point (and it refers to todo en la vida, as another answerer mentioned). The meaning is almost the same as: El dinero no es todo en la vida. Money isn't everything in life. The extra lo gives a feeling similar to this English phrase: Money - it's not ...


1

The lo in this sentence refers to "todo en la vida". It's a direct object pronoun. The same thing applies for: Te lo doy el dinero. Means: I give you the money. This could also be stated as: Te doy el dinero. Or, assuming that money is already involved in this conversation, you could say Te lo doy. To mean "I give it to you", with ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible