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9

Contrary to what fedorqui states in his answer, you can rarely talk in binary terms (correct/incorrect) when addressing language use or, specially, dictionaries. Dictionaries' task is to exclusively establish which uses are the most common in any given language and describing them, not prescribing them. Anyhow, the use of the diminutive suffix -illo (as in ...


7

It is indeed quite complicated to distinguish whether Julieta Venegas says suavecito or suavecillo. I listened to the verse few times and I still cannot tell. However, the diminutive for suave cannot be suavecillo. Instead, use suavecito. You cannot find this in the normal dictionary, since diminutives and superlatives normally are not listed there (its ...


6

The problem with translating phrases like this are that they are poetic, not idiomatic. Saying "dame tu luz" isn't an idiom, but a poetic saying. With that in mind, we have to interpret what the artist is trying to say. If we look at the lyrics to the song, we see from the first verse that the singer is looking at "pequño amor" as a star. In this case, ...


5

I don't know the song, but the translation of that sentence should simply be: give me your light It's not "give me birth/give birth to me", because in that case it should be "dame la luz", for example. Remember that like él (personal pronoun) and el (masculine singular article), also tú (personal pronoun) and tu (possessive pronoun) has a subtle ...


5

The original "translation" by María Grever (which appeared on the sheet music back in the '30s, along with Cole Porter's English lyrics) doesn't have all that much to do with the English lyrics. Lyrics websites being generally pretty horrible I don't want to link to one, but you can find them by searching for something like Jorge-Negrete Begin-the-beguine. ...


5

It's just a bad transcription. The correct one is: Jamás poderes ambicioné Mentiras dijeron de mí Which means I never had any ambition of power Lies were told about me


3

In this case is "vamos a todo" you can be translated as : "let's go to do everything". "Vamo'a to'" is a vulgar way of saying : "Vamos a todo", or "vamos a hacer lo que sea" or "vamos a hacer de todo".


3

I think that the translation to "Volver a Empezar" was made to mantain the sense of the original title: "Begin the Beguine" here, if you pronounce the title you have something like "begin the begin" like "comenzar el comienzo".


3

The confusion arises because we never hear the end of the word, as it overlaps with the next line, that starts with: Y yo... So we hear something like: suaveci-- Y yo In many Spanish speaking regions including Mexico, Y yo sounds exactly as -illo. That's why one could hear this as suavecillo. See this question and this Wikipedia article In the ...


3

Don't trust song lyrics since many times they are not grammatically correct. They just try to fix themselves to the melody. If you check the lyrics first he says the sentence twice but in both ways: No importa qué diga el destino We don't know yet what it has said. (Subjunctive for supposition), and it doesn't matter what Fate can say. No me ...


2

Comienza el baile Given that "beguine" is a dance.


2

Camínalo, rompe el cajón, saca los cuadros, camínalo


2

Me la paso pensándote This is more like a figure of speech. A rather pseudo figure of speech IMO. Now, me refers to the person aforementioned. In the song he is already talking about himself before so he can refer to himself again by only using Me. La is the singular feminine of a thing. This means that it refers to something that I am talking about, in ...


2

That "to" is an informal abbreviation for "todo", where the D is pronnounced as mute ("TO-o") So it would be "vamos a todo" (let's go [and do] everything).


1

Suavecillo is more vernacular, but almost not used in Mexico. Julieta would certainly say "suavecito". Suavecillo would be more Venezuelan.


1

The songs says: Suavecito. "Suavecillo" its a regular expression used on the north of the country (México). The finish on words "illo" its so normal. "Plebillo" (Plebito), "Perrillo" (Perrito), etc.


1

That is like "let's do this!". We use that phrase in my country more than often, is a common expression in the caribbiean.


1

The biggest problem in translating Spanish to English is that the two languages are too dissimilar to always make use of direct translations, so I will try to explain the heartfelt meaning of the translations. Pequeños amor, por siempre tu. Pequeño amor, dame tu luz. Small love you forever. Little love, give me your light. This song ...



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