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6

We don't normally mix up those sounds in Spanish. The Spanish 'p/b' pair is basically the same as in English. The only difference is that in English 'p' is a little more "explosive". (BTW, recall that in Spanish there is no difference between 'v' and 'b', if an English pronounce an English 'v' we will interpret the same as a 'b') Regarding the pair 't/d', ...


6

Simplemente indicar el país, por ejemplo: Español Venezolano. Cada dialecto, generalmente, no tiene un nombre especialmente definido. Puedes leer mas información aqui: http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idioma_espa%C3%B1ol#Variedades_dialectales_del_espa.C3.B1ol Comunmente en internet se le suele llamar Latino o Español Latino. En otros casos se usa el nombre ...


5

I tend to be skeptical about claims of "language A has x times many more words than language B". Personally, I have been using Spanish and English literally every single day for the last 12 years and I still haven't encountered a situation in which I had to use English because Spanish didn't have a word for the concept I was trying to express (or vice ...


4

La primera es la correcta. The first one is better than the second because the last part in the second phrase: 'El fuego de mi espíritu' sounds weird in the context. Sorry for my english... spanish is my main language


3

Español latino. Incluso, por ejemplo, si buscas en youtube series o películas dobladas en cierta página de videos, para diferenciar los tipos de español lo más frecuente es poner "español latino" o simplemente "latino".


2

This is a somehow extended comment and complement rather than an answer (I've already upvoted Ashen's answer). The number of total words in a dictionary or the number of total words for college or basic conversation is sometimes biased by the meaning of word. Let's take one example out of many: “typewriter” v/s «máquina de escribir». The English ...


1

you can use both, but commonly in spanish we said "El Dia de los muertos" if you want to used in something like a post.


1

DELE is offered by Instituto Cervantes who is founder of SICELE together with many universities from America. https://sites.google.com/a/sicele.org/sicele/miembros-de-sicele/miembros-fundadores https://sites.google.com/a/sicele.org/sicele/asociaciones So I am quite sure that DELE is the only one, many Mexicans universities are in the list. By the ...


1

I am from México and we use both but "El día de los muertos" sounds too poethic to me, and "El día de muertos" is the normal way. But it's almost the same.


1

In some languages, the difference between voiced/voiceless consonants is unimportant; they do, nevertheless, differentiate between aspired and non-aspired consonants. The main example for this is Chinese. I guess this is the case with your mother language. Native Spanish speakers usually have no problems telling a voiced (b, d, g) consonant from its ...


1

Based on my own experience, I would say that these misunderstandings never happen with Spanish words in a normal conversation. All of the pairs I could think of are so removed from each other in meaning and function that it's hard to imagine a situation where they could be mistaken: barco(ship) / parco(poor) cada(each) / cata(tasting) Paca(short name for ...


1

First of all these three words: dendro, tendro, tentro don't exist in the Spanish language. So if you here something like that, you must be hearing dentro that means inside pa.pe.pi.po.pu for the sound of the p is really like the English one, close your lips and blow the air, the word POWER is a good example to know how to say it. ba.be.bi.bo.bu this sound ...


1

The fewer number of words in Spanish, however, doesn't mean that it can't be just as expressive as English; sometimes it is more so. One feature that Spanish has when compared to English is a flexible word order. Thus the distinction that is made in English between "dark night" and "gloomy night" might be made in Spanish by saying noche oscura ...



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