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Hay muchas expresiones sobre partes del cuerpo que se usan en el sentido de "un precio muy alto": Ese coche cuesta un ojo de la cara. Ese coche cuesta un riñón. Ese coche cuesta un huevo [en el sentido de un testículo]. La expresión "un huevo", al contrario que las demás, ha extendido su uso a otros contextos con el sentido general de "mucho": Trabajas ...


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Is the equivalent as your are weighty - same as "pesas mucho" o "estas super pesado"


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We use that phrase here too, in Andalusia. And yes, it's translated to: You're heavy as hell.


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Avoid its use in Colombia, is a very vulgar word and is often related to street slang specially in north coast of our country. In large cities is not well seen as it denotes poor or street background, lack of education, intention to offense and in general defines a person as vulgar, not trustable.


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In Spain, it's equivalent to "pesas mucho". In English it would be "You're very weighty"


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Huevos besides testicles is also used as a intensifier. So the phrase: Pesas un huevo. is translated as: You're heavy as hell. You can use it with lot of things. Me importa un huevo. [In don't give a shit] Me costó un huevo. [It was hard as shit] Caminé un huevo. [I walked a lot] And yes, it's vulgar, but pretty normal.


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No need to use the word unless in technical situations. A similar word is 'envergadura' which mostly means how wide, thick, or (in a metaphorical sense) important, something is. But the other word is quite unnecessary in day-to-day life. (As for the rules: I'm quite sure that in this case, research can be based on personal experience...and is probably ...


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You should only use that word when you are trying to offend someone. Likely examples are in the same vein as calling someone shitface, you would say 'cara de verga' which is common in México, but as i said before is meant to insult, in méxico people use double meanings and as a joke you could call a real close friend, who gets that you are joking with that ...


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Just avoid using that word at all. Even in casual conversations it is vulgar.


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I think I would avoid using "verga" if you are not sure if anybody could be offended. Better safe than sorry. Regarding the last part of your question, I think there is a context where it could be not that offensive. As stated in the link to the RAE entry for this word, it is (just) a synonym for "pene". Then, it is explained that is an "interjección vulgar ...


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Aside from technical you shouldn't use verga in formal situations, since is considered peyorative for some people depending on your location. As a Venezuelan citizen, I can tell you that the word verga its widely used by us but in an informal (and quite often an ofensive) way. It can connotate several things: An object or replacement for a word that you ...


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Two answers regarding if and when you can use it: yes, if you are talking about an animal and navigation. No, if you refer to humans, as then it is straight vulgar. Edition: Here is a pair of examples of acceptable use, Manual del remontista ... page 11, the author's intended audience are interested in horses; and navegacion en Egipto ... pg 39, where is ...


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It is. I have actually never heard much "abue" (I have heard "abu" more often), but it works as a "pet term" for both "Abuelo" and "Abuela". There are several pet terms for abuelos and abuelas. Among many others: Abuelos: yayo, tata, abu, abue, nono, papito, papá + nombre del abuelo (eg. Papá Félix), agüelillo, agüelito, "abelo", lito, bueli. ...



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