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5

¡Interesante pregunta! Tampoco yo sabía el origen de esta expresión, así que buscándola encontré un blog la mar de interesante con una explicación bastante convincente: Columna Zero - origen de la expresión vete a freír espárragos La frase vete a freír espárragos data del Siglo XIX, y se usaba con la misma intención que actualmente. A sabiendas que el ...


0

Is it used in Latin America? Nope. In Latin America, the common form would be "han."


2

It is not standard Spanish and I've likewise never heard it. That said, many regions of Spain spoke (and/or speak) languages other than Castilian and, as a result, their Castilian can be sometimes strongly influenced by those. Note their conjugations of haber/haver: Language | Conjugation | Note ...


0

I have lived in Sevilla (capital of Andalusia) for almost 28 years and I think I have never heard * hais, which is obviously incorrect and anyone with some basic education will stigmatize as vulgar. Some poorly educated people do say * habemos instead of hemos. But I don't think people say * hais.


0

The proof it's not the spanish word you are refering to, is that you have spelled it with a y, and not a i. "Sympa" is a french word, used in "tu es sympa!" or "c'est sympa!". It's more friendly and casual than "sympathique" that has a more formal meaning.


4

"Tener paja" significa Tener desgano, no tener ganas de hacer nada. Por lo que la frase del ejemplo significa "Él no tiene ganas de nada y ella quiere cambiar el mundo (lo que implica un montón de trabajo)". Es una expresión argentina, aunque quizá sea entendida y usada en otros países de América latina (no así en España, donde se usaría un ...


5

The reference you provided does not state that "sympa" is by any means a word in Spanish. That sympatico may be an English slang, probably originated from the Spanish simpático (Although it could very well be originated from the French sympathique), but that does not mean that "sympa" has a real meaning in Spanish. When I have heard "simpa" (sounds the ...


-3

"El Chico" That is the best translation


2

To convey the pejorative connotations of "young whippersnapper" to "the kid" as a moniker I would go with: Niñato: Dicho de un joven: Sin experiencia /Petulante y presuntuoso It addresses someone young (who is possibly rude or a spoiled brat) as unexperienced but yet overconfident and annoying. Other synonyms for "kid" (apart from the more mainstream ...


3

Whereas you want to translate a word with a marked connotative tone, do not use saying "El Niño" which is very neutral in the case. Instead you could use any of the following: El Chico El Nene El Chavo (México) El Chaval (España) El Pibe (Argentina) In Chile we prefer "El Cabro Chico", but is a local idiom.


1

Sure! The verb is seguir + nos which is a direct object pronoun. Yo te sigo. I am following you. Here is another one El me sigue He is following me. In this example, seguir is an irregular verb: sigo, sigues, sigue, seguimos, seguís, siguen. The imperative is sigue. síguenos Follow us! This sounds like Facebook. "Follow ...


5

Síguenos is a standard Spanish word. The verb seguir means “to follow.” Sigue is the affirmative tú command (second-person singular informal imperative) of seguir. Nos is a direct object pronoun that means “us.” With affirmative commands, pronouns are compounded with the imperative verb (that is, with the command). Therefore, síguenos means “follow us!” This ...


4

The correct term is: ¿qué tal? This a very used term when you already said something: hola, ¿qué tal?; buenas tardes, ¿qué tal? etc.


-3

It's like saying "fool" or "fag" or "nigga"



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