Hot answers tagged

15

Written with normal spelling, it reads as follows: ¿Para qué quieres saber eso? Jaja. Saludos. In other words: Whither dost thou want to know that? Ha. Farewell. Okay, that's a bit formal. It's more like Y u wanna know? Lol kbai


7

Síguenos is a standard Spanish word. The verb seguir means “to follow.” Sigue is the affirmative tú command (second-person singular informal imperative) of seguir. Nos is a direct object pronoun that means “us.” With affirmative commands, pronouns are compounded with the imperative verb (that is, with the command). Therefore, síguenos means “follow us!” This ...


7

If you want a more universal expression here are a few suggestions: ¡Excelente! ¡Súper bien! ¡Increíble! ¡Genial! ¡Fantástico! These are the more general expressions to say it. Expressions like Está bueno, Estaría bueno que..., Chévere, Chido, Guay, Se las goza etc... are limited to a geographical area or country so not really ...


6

The reference you provided does not state that "sympa" is by any means a word in Spanish. That sympatico may be an English slang, probably originated from the Spanish simpático (Although it could very well be originated from the French sympathique), but that does not mean that "sympa" has a real meaning in Spanish. When I have heard "simpa" (sounds the ...


6

La expresión es usualmente "loquesea or bust", significa "loquesea o morir en el intento", y se popularizó aparentemente durante la Fiebre del Oro. No he visto la serie que mencionas, pero ha de ser un juego de palabras que hace referencia a la (según Wikipedia) ignorancia que el personaje tiene sobre la cultura estadounidense.


5

¡Interesante pregunta! Tampoco yo sabía el origen de esta expresión, así que buscándola encontré un blog la mar de interesante con una explicación bastante convincente: Columna Zero - origen de la expresión vete a freír espárragos La frase vete a freír espárragos data del Siglo XIX, y se usaba con la misma intención que actualmente. A sabiendas que el ...


5

This question is really interesting to me. You are not saying anything about the father (if there is one) and that factor could influence too how the boy speaks. I don't know Mexican culture well enough to be sure what the boy would say if both parents were Mexican, but it is interesting to me how people in the States say "My dad/mom ...". Never "My ...


5

In general, "mamá" is perfectly acceptable and the most common (I would say). However, "amá" or "ma" are very common among Mexicans as well, so nothing wrong with them either. If I had to choose one of them, I would use "mamá".


5

Huevos besides testicles is also used as a intensifier. So the phrase: Pesas un huevo. is translated as: You're heavy as hell. You can use it with lot of things. Me importa un huevo. [In don't give a shit] Me costó un huevo. [It was hard as shit] Caminé un huevo. [I walked a lot] And yes, it's vulgar, but pretty normal.


5

I guess it is not "Kari" but "Cari", or it has this leading K instead of C because of the typical usage of K in internet messages. Either ways, it stands for cariño. Reading from The Free Dictionary: 4 Se emplea para dirigirse cariñosamente a una persona: ¡hola, cariño!, ¿qué tal el colegio? So this is way to address someone you feel very much ...


5

I don't know if "Qué padre" is only used in Mexico, but I can tell you it's not used in Spain at least. The problem about translating slang words or expressions is that those are among the kind of expressions that vary the most from one country to another (along with food, I'd say). Some countries use the English term "cool", as in "¡Qué cool!", but other ...


4

According to Tumbaburro de la Picardia Mexicana (Jimenez, A. Editorial Diana, 1977), a book that compiles hundreds of Mexican slang expressions, "cueros de rana" would be... "...a 100 pesos banknote that had a brownish colour and went out of print in 1975". Incidentally, and according to Bank of Mexico, from 1925 and 1978 Mexican banknotes were ...


4

The correct term is: ¿qué tal? This a very used term when you already said something: hola, ¿qué tal?; buenas tardes, ¿qué tal? etc.


4

Aside from technical you shouldn't use verga in formal situations, since is considered peyorative for some people depending on your location. As a Venezuelan citizen, I can tell you that the word verga its widely used by us but in an informal (and quite often an ofensive) way. It can connotate several things: An object or replacement for a word that you ...


4

"Tener paja" significa Tener desgano, no tener ganas de hacer nada. Por lo que la frase del ejemplo significa "Él no tiene ganas de nada y ella quiere cambiar el mundo (lo que implica un montón de trabajo)". Es una expresión argentina, aunque quizá sea entendida y usada en otros países de América latina (no así en España, donde se usaría un ...


4

It is. I have actually never heard much "abue" (I have heard "abu" more often), but it works as a "pet term" for both "Abuelo" and "Abuela". There are several pet terms for abuelos and abuelas. Among many others: Abuelos: yayo, tata, abu, abue, nono, papito, papá + nombre del abuelo (eg. Papá Félix), agüelillo, agüelito, "abelo", lito, bueli. ...


4

Whereas you want to translate a word with a marked connotative tone, do not use saying "El Niño" which is very neutral in the case. Instead you could use any of the following: El Chico El Nene El Chavo (México) El Chaval (España) El Pibe (Argentina) In Chile we prefer "El Cabro Chico", but is a local idiom.


4

In peninsular it's not uncommon to hear «en plan», but it's very informal (even slang-ish) and regarded as a lack of vocabulary. Pasábamos con el coche y ella en plan «¿Habéis visto eso?». Y ellos en plan «No, ¿qué era?».


3

Speaking of Mexico, it's a very old and used phrase, which is not very common nowadays. The most common use is as a "polite" way to threaten or to warn somebody about a given situation. It's used a lot in old 50's movies...usually by elderly people and mother roles. My grandparents used to say that a lot as well. Example: The Mom leaves to the market, ...


3

To convey the pejorative connotations of "young whippersnapper" to "the kid" as a moniker I would go with: Niñato: Dicho de un joven: Sin experiencia /Petulante y presuntuoso It addresses someone young (who is possibly rude or a spoiled brat) as unexperienced but yet overconfident and annoying. Other synonyms for "kid" (apart from the more mainstream ...


3

In Mexico, there are many slang words that are so commonly used, that fit on both contexts you explain - awesome or sweet. The most fitting word in my perspective is ahuevo. I just thought about myself in the example situations you described when using those words and I totally felt to say "ahuevo" in both of them...(and I strongly believe that would be ...


3

Just avoid using that word at all. Even in casual conversations it is vulgar.


3

In colloquial Puerto Rican Spanish, there are some forms that seem to adhere very closely to the above-mentioned model: “She was like, ‘Who the heck are you?’” Ella se puso con “¿Quién carajo eres tú?” “Suddenly, he is like, ‘Leave me alone!!’” De repente, él sale con “¡¡Déjame quieto!!”


2

En México, darse un pase significa esnifar cocaina. Ponerse un pasón, es una variante de dicha expresión, en la cual se utiliza un aumentativo de pase, no sé si correcta o incorrectamente. Un pase, es la dosis de cocaína que se esnifa de una vez. También se le conoce como grapa o raya.


2

Amigui is like amigo but in a more affectionate way. "Amigui" as a word doesn't exist and I never used it, but in Spain we use to say "coleguis" instead of "colegas" (buddies) with the same nuance


2

It is not standard Spanish and I've likewise never heard it. That said, many regions of Spain spoke (and/or speak) languages other than Castilian and, as a result, their Castilian can be sometimes strongly influenced by those. Note their conjugations of haber/haver: Language | Conjugation | Note ...


2

Según la versión electrónica de la 23.ª edición del «Diccionario de la lengua española» el patillas, o patillas m. p. us. El diablo (príncipe de los ángeles rebelados). Buscando por Google encontré este libro Cuento tradicional, cultura, literatura (siglos XVI-XIX) By Máxime Chevalier El demonio tiene pies -o patas- disformes: es el «patituerto» ...


2

As you pointed out, there are a lot of regional terms such as qué padre in Mexico and macanudo in Central America. There's more great examples on this thread. Also, here's a great Spanish Stack Exchange thread discussing que suave If you want something universal you could use impresionante in a formal situation or ¡anda! as more of an informal stand-alone ...


2

The thing about jergas, or colloquial expressions, is that Spanish speakers world-wide recognise them - even if they are not their local lingo. For example, as an English speaker you know that "That's pretty choice, bro!" is an expression of approval. You might even recognise it as colloquial New Zealand English (especially if it were spoken with the ...


2

Translation: "Why do u want to know it? haha regards" It was a meme born by Yahoo Answers, this user asked for a question of philosophy: http://prntscr.com/9o1pp9 (about books) and other user answered : http://prntscr.com/9o1q4n



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible