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7

"De volada" significa "muy rápido" si ella dice que el tiempo se le fue de volada significa que se le fue muy rápido. ¡Vete por las tortillas de volada! [Vete por las tortillas, rápido] Es bastante normal en México. Se puede utilizar en todos los contextos, formales e informales, a menos claro que el asunto requiera extrema formalidad, pero no debería ...


5

I think you are confused because you are mixing two completely unrelated concepts. The concept of "bad words" or vulgarities is a social concept, which varies greatly from region to region, and can often be influenced by local laws (i.e. certain English words cannot be said on broadcast television or radio in the US). This is true in any language. The ...


5

La palabra TUANI proviene del alfabeto creado por el General Malespín durante la intervención de Estados Unidos en Nicaragua en 1,912, en ese entonces el General Benjamin Zeledón le encomendó al Gral. Malespín que creara un alfabeto especial para poder enviar y recibir mensajes sin que los gringos pudieran descifrarlo. El alfabeto consistía en cambiar ...


4

According to Tumbaburro de la Picardia Mexicana (Jimenez, A. Editorial Diana, 1977), a book that compiles hundreds of Mexican slang expressions, "cueros de rana" would be... "...a 100 pesos banknote that had a brownish colour and went out of print in 1975". Incidentally, and according to Bank of Mexico, from 1925 and 1978 Mexican banknotes were ...


4

Huevos besides testicles is also used as a intensifier. So the phrase: Pesas un huevo. is translated as: You're heavy as hell. You can use it with lot of things. Me importa un huevo. [In don't give a shit] Me costó un huevo. [It was hard as shit] Caminé un huevo. [I walked a lot] And yes, it's vulgar, but pretty normal.


4

Awesome is easy to translate. Being more formal and standardized, you can use something like this: Fabuloso Increíble Espectacular Fantástico Sweet instead is a problem because the word itself is a colloquial idiom. I can suggest you ¡Qué bien! but not really much difference with awesome. In my opinion it will depend on the ...


4

It is. I have actually never heard much "abue" (I have heard "abu" more often), but it works as a "pet term" for both "Abuelo" and "Abuela". There are several pet terms for abuelos and abuelas. Among many others: Abuelos: yayo, tata, abu, abue, nono, papito, papá + nombre del abuelo (eg. Papá Félix), agüelillo, agüelito, "abelo", lito, bueli. ...


4

Aside from technical you shouldn't use verga in formal situations, since is considered peyorative for some people depending on your location. As a Venezuelan citizen, I can tell you that the word verga its widely used by us but in an informal (and quite often an ofensive) way. It can connotate several things: An object or replacement for a word that you ...


3

In Mexico, there are many slang words that are so commonly used, that fit on both contexts you explain - awesome or sweet. The most fitting word in my perspective is ahuevo. I just thought about myself in the example situations you described when using those words and I totally felt to say "ahuevo" in both of them...(and I strongly believe that would be ...


3

Just avoid using that word at all. Even in casual conversations it is vulgar.


2

Según el Diccionario de americanismos, «parce» es apócope de «parcero» en Colombia y Ecuador, y «parcero, -a» es una forma de tratamiento usada entre jóvenes (amigo íntimo, compañero inseparable).


2

You are using "good" and "bad" in two different ways here. The words you present are offensive to some people, regardless of whether or not the opinion conveyed is positive or negative. The degree to which listeners will be offended depends on the country, the social class, and whole lot of other factors. Learning when to be "socially correct" and when ...


2

Como comentario adicional "de volada" también lo usamos en México como sinónimo de mujer que anda coqueteando "Adriana anda de volada con el hijo de don Toño"


2

First, it is text-messaging, so the spelling is unique (economy of characters). It would be saying Pero tenéis tema que te quemas, o no? I figure that that slang tema que te quemas uses that rhyme to sound catchy and, without any context, I would assume that there something going on among a group of friends, for example, that has everyone rattled or ...


2

Parece ser que viene de la palabra "guacal". Con frecuencia el contenido de los guacales después de su uso es agua sucia. Esta agua sucia solían algunas personas lanzarlas por las puertas hacia la calle… el pasante ocasional y sin mucha suerte podía recibir esa ‘guacalada’. La propia palabra es en sí bastante onomatopéyica, por lo que de guacal o gualcada ...


2

I don't kwon if is widely used in Latin America, but you could try with "mola" from the verb molar. This is a colloquialism that could be used in both contexts provided since it not only carries the connotation of Gustar, resultar agradable but also for something to be cool or fascinating. Lets say that in both situations (either receiving my paycheck ...


2

I don't believe I've used them, or heard them, before today. I inquired my coworkers on them, and their answers essentially match the connotations other answers have given you, so far. What I would add is that both are phrases you would only use with those close to you, and that the fact that they rely on 'bad words' doesn't change the nature of such words ...


2

La expresión desde luego no es universal. En España Dama vivida no tiene un significado como el que describes (ni ningún otro. Un español ante esa expresión te preguntaría si te refieres a una mujer de edad que se la ha pasado de fiesta en fiesta o algo similar). En España (esto variará en otros países de habla hispana) el slang para coche (no decimos carro ...


1

this is a very old expression, and probably nobody uses it nowadays. My understanding is that it means U.S. dollars. I came across this expression reading La familia burrón, an old Mexican comic


1

Avoid its use in Colombia, is a very vulgar word and is often related to street slang specially in north coast of our country. In large cities is not well seen as it denotes poor or street background, lack of education, intention to offense and in general defines a person as vulgar, not trustable.


1

Ojo con los Orozco is a song from León Gieco, a renown argentinian artist. The song only have words with the vowel o. It's a very funny lyric, the song is about the fictional Orozco family and it says something about every member of it (like being drug addict, alcoholic, usurer). It might be a little hard to understand (it's not easy to make a whole song ...


1

Hay que prestar atención a los verbos cuando éstos impliquen el contacto con otra persona o cosa. Cosas como: Jugar, tocar, comer, saborear, meter, agarrar, tomar, beber, chupar, raspar, restregar, besar, lamer... etc. Son muchísimas formas en las que pueden darle la vuelta a cualquier comentario para alburearte. Tienes que prestar mucha atención a ...


1

En Colombia, se usa la palabra parce en lugar de amigo pero que de igual manera, tiene sus mismas connotaciones; un equivalente válido en inglés puede ser la palabra "buddy". A su vez, la palabra parce es la abreviación de parcero. Amigo o compañero con quien se tiene mucha confianza. As complement, the word nigga would be interpreted as reference to ...


1

I'm Mexican, born and raised...and the use and acceptance of that word varies according to the region. Of course, it is very informal, and should be avoided if you are with complete strangers. And you need to know how to use it in order to avoid offensive situations. People in Northern, and West-coast regions are very used to that word. The word can be ...


1

I think I would avoid using "verga" if you are not sure if anybody could be offended. Better safe than sorry. Regarding the last part of your question, I think there is a context where it could be not that offensive. As stated in the link to the RAE entry for this word, it is (just) a synonym for "pene". Then, it is explained that is an "interjección vulgar ...


1

Two answers regarding if and when you can use it: yes, if you are talking about an animal and navigation. No, if you refer to humans, as then it is straight vulgar. Edition: Here is a pair of examples of acceptable use, Manual del remontista ... page 11, the author's intended audience are interested in horses; and navegacion en Egipto ... pg 39, where is ...


1

You have come across two different examples here. "Mucha mierda" is slang for Theatre people. There is superstition among them that it is actually bad luck to wish "Good luck" to someone, which would be "Mucha suerte" in spanish. So, to avoid saying "Mucha suerte" they have come to "Mucha mierda" as a substitute, as it is, on first sight, exactly the ...


1

In Spain, but I don't think in the Americas, another phrase which is used a fair bit, with similar meaning to de puta madre is: es la hostia which the Real Academia Española tranlates as muy grande o extraordinario, or simply hostia on its own which expresses surprise or admiration, see other meanings of hostia. As the original meaning is the wafer used ...


1

Just to add more info to your question. You can find that, in different places, and depending on the situation and to who are you talking, bad expressions could be pretty well received. For example, on the north of Spain it's not uncommon to hear friends referring themselves with expressions like: "Ven aquí, cabronazo" -- Come here, bastard or "Serás ...



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