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6

Rude words and expressions have little to do with their literal meanings. For example a literal translation of "God damn it!" would be something like "¡Que Dios lo condene!" which doesn't sound rude at all in Spanish. In fact it sounds kind of refined, like you personally think something is bad but are humbly deferring the judgment to God. It is inevitable ...


4

Here in Spain the term is known, but I think it is a bit pejorative term, and it is not used when you speak about clothes in a standard way. Some examples: Pero si apenas me he comprado un par de trapitos... ¿Qué son esos trapos que llevas puestos? In both cases, the term refers to low quality, cheap clothes (always from a subjective point of ...


3

Besides the arguments given by @SantagoTórtora, you have to considerer that usually it takes more time to read than to listen. In a movie that is fast paced, they may need to cut the subtitles short, and that may be another reason for their not translating faithfully the audio - they sometimes omit words (or even full sentences), make substitutions , etc. A ...


2

Soy de Argentina y acá por lo menos no se utiliza y tampoco lo había escuchado con ese significado. Por ahí si te interesa acá llamamos "trapitos" a las personas que te cuidan el auto en la calle (lo cual es medio relativo porque en realidad les tenés que dar plata para que no te rompan el auto ellos).


1

Dysphemisms (ie, using a dismissive word advisedly rather than another neutral) are especially used to bypass painful or taboo concepts. But sometimes we find "soft" examples in the colloquial language, with sense of humor and almost affectionate. Apart from "trapos" (rags) to refer to clothing, also come to mind these (in Chilean colloquial speak): ...



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