Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

¿Bueno? Is used as a greeting when answering the phone (primarily in Mexico). ¡Buenas! As a short form of buenos/as (días|tardes|noches) is used as greeting in some regions of Spain and Latin America (Colombia, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Mexico).


13

A una persona con pocos conocimientos se le dice coloquialmente "burro". Un "mataburros" es literalmente algo que elimina a los burros y de ahí que (en Argentina, por ejemplo) al diccionario se le diga "mataburros" pues ayuda a suprimir burros, es decir, personas sin conocimientos. Un caso similar sucede con "tumbaburros" que es otra de las maneras ...


13

Here in Chile, mateo / matea means someone who studies very often, someone diligent who always does his homework at school or college. According to "Voces de origen lunfardo en el registro festivo del diario chileno La Cuarta" 1 , its origin comes from the word mate which means head: mate  → head mateo  → someone who ...


11

There are many many ways to say this, here are some examples: (With the help of other answers, more like a compilation) Be aware it really depends on where you are, although most will be understood in all the spanish speaking countries. If you use one from another place you will likely receive a you are an outsider look Argentina: hincha-pelotas ...


11

En el diccionario de la Real Academia de la Lengua Española, señala a Antier como la forma coloquial de anteayer, es decir es exactamente lo mismo, pero en un contexto muchísimo más informal, no conocía este adverbio, muchas gracias. Te dejo aquí la URL http://lema.rae.es/drae/?val=antier Edito Es decir, sí estás en lo cierto es jerga, pero del Español ...


10

Lo que yo hago (otros harán otras cosas): Te hace gracia y te sonríes :) Te hace gracia y te ríes :D Una sonrisa perversa: jejejeje (como levantando el labio superior por el lado derecho) Una sonrisa malvada: muahahahaha (como el malvado que se ríe cuando su trampa ha funcionado) Alguien metió la pata, te sorprendes y te hace un poquito de gracia: Juas Of ...


8

In Argentina: In informal conversation, it's roughly equivalent to 'terrific', as in very good, awesome For example, '¡El recital estuvo mortal!' meaning that it was really good, that I enjoyed it very much.


8

They use "jajaja": the more "ja", the stronger the laugh. But there are variations, like jejeje, which is a less strong laugh and can be a nervous laugh or an "evil" laugh. Anyway, there seem to be "alternatives" for LOL in Spanish: CMC (casi me cago) = It means "I almost p**p my pants (from laughter)"; RAC (reír a carcajadas) = lol I've also seen "MDR" ...


8

You'll here it quite a lot in the Andalusia region of Spain. This Wikipedia article gives a very brief coverage of it: Relaxed pronunciation / Spanish


8

The Academia Mexicana de la Lengua lists it in the Diccionario breve de mexicanismos, which would tend to support the anecdotal evidence that everyone has given so far (and that I would add to - I heard it a lot in Mexico, but I've only heard it from Mexicans elsewhere that I can recall).


8

The Diccionario del Español de Nicaragua by Francisco Arellano Oviedo of the Academia Nicaragüense de la Lengua defines it as solid excrement, an incapable person, or a person of little social worth: cerote. m. mals. Mierda sólida. Arturo come maduro, cerote duro. (dicho popular). || 2. desp. Persona incapaz. El que llegue por último es cerote de ...


8

As a mexican, I can tell you that even though Chewie is 100% right in all of his affirmations about the word "chingar" and its derivatives, your friend told you the correct thing as well. Let me explain. The form "chinga" can have different meanings depending on the context: 1 - As the conjugation of the singular third person of "chingar". In this ...


7

According to the RAE's dictionary, "mataburros" means dictionary only in Argentina, Costa Rica, Cuba, Honduras, Uruguay and Venezuela; "tumbaburros", as you said, only in Mexico. Since "burro" is also used to refer to ignorant/rude/uncivil people, the "mataburro" becomes an object that "kills" those kind of people.


7

It's a prefix. This is what RAE says: re-. (Del lat. re-). 1. pref. Significa 'repetición'. Reconstruir. pref. Significa 'movimiento hacia atrás'. Refluir. pref. Denota 'intensificación'. Recargar. pref. Indica 'oposición' o 'resistencia'. Rechazar. Repugnar. Significa 'negación' o 'inversión del significado simple'. Reprobar. Con ...


7

It's a Dominican slang way of saying "what's up" (or even WTF), most likely coming from "¿qué es lo que esta pasando?" (What's happening? or What's going on?), suppressing the s in a way like this: ¿Qué es lo que... (está pasando, pasa, etc)? > ¿Qué eh lo que...? > ¿Qué e lo que...? > ¿Qué'e lo que...? > ¿Qué lo que...?


7

"antier" es de uso común aquí en México para referirse al día antes de ayer. De hecho jamás he escuchado a alguien decir "anteayer" aquí. El uso de "antier" en México lo confirma la RAE según la siguiente cita. anteayer. ‘En el día anterior a ayer’. También puede usarse la locución antes de ayer; pero la grafía anteayer es la preferida en el uso por ...


7

"Coño" significa vulva y "coñazo" es simplemente el aumentativo de "coño". El uso en España de "coñazo" es coloquial: "Dar el coñazo" es dar la lata o dar la tabarra. "Ser un coñazo" es ser un pesado. Algo muy aburrido "es un coñazo". "Dar el coñazo" es malsonante, por supuesto, pero no es raro el uso cariñoso en un contexto familiar o de ...


7

"Dentro de lo que cabe" viene de "Dentro de lo que cabe esperar". A su vez, "Lo que cabe esperar" es el conjunto de posibles (o más bien esperables) resultados de una acción o de un hecho natural. Así, "dentro de lo que cabe (esperar)" implica que algo está entre los posibles resultados. Tu marido está bien, entre los posibles resultados (anímicos) del ...


6

Yes there is: Puta is the perfect example. Widely recognized, even in Equatorian Guinea and in the Philippines.


6

Es la primera vez que oigo esta palabra (soy de España). Según la RAE es una palabra coloquial (no vulgar) que se usa por centroamérica (según la RAE, en el Salvador, Honduras y Nicaragua) para decir que algo es de calidad o está de moda. tuanis. 1. adj. coloq. El Salv. y Hond. Dicho de una cosa: De excelente calidad. 2. adj. coloq. Hond. ...


5

Es una abreviatura muy extendida por gran parte de latino américa y España. Se usa sobre todo en el lenguaje coloquial y es similar al caso de las terminaciones -ado -ido ... en los verbos que suele eliminarse la letra "d" ¿Has "terminao" los deberes? No, mamá son pa' pasado mañana. En ningún caso se utiliza en el lenguaje escrito


5

Cerote is the definition for a piece of shit, but if you are in Guatemala, for instance, Cerote could be in a friendly way to say that you did something wrong or impolite Ej. "Cerote, esa era mi cerveza" (Man, that was my beer). Also could be used for a greeting in a closer friendship "Que hay cerote??? como vas???" (what's up dude). if you want to denigrate ...


5

I personally think there are certain ways to achieve this. But be aware that they are personal and subjective. I have been writing for a long time and I hope you find them useful. I seldom use the pronoun vosotros which is predominantly used in Spain and is considered overly formal in Latin America. I use it only when my purpose is formality and a ...


5

I've heard that padre is predominantly Mexican slang.


5

This appears to be one of those versatile slang words which can mean loads of things (many of them swearwords) depending on the context, region, dialect, etc. First of all, your friend is definitely wrong about chingar not meaning to fuck, with lots of derivations: chingarla (to fuck up), chingar a alguien (fucking with someone or pissing off someone), me ...


5

Alta o alto se usa como sinónimo de buena calidad. Llanta significa zapatilla (creo que en otros países les dicen "tenis", sería calzado deportivo); ea significado de llanta se llega, creo, por metáfora con la llanta de un auto, que sería el "calzado"; la llanta (una parte de la rueda) a su vez representa en realidad la rueda (el todo), si no me equivoco ...


5

"De volada" significa "muy rápido" si ella dice que el tiempo se le fue de volada significa que se le fue muy rápido. ¡Vete por las tortillas de volada! [Vete por las tortillas, rápido] Es bastante normal en México. Se puede utilizar en todos los contextos, formales e informales, dependiendo de que tan relajado sea el asunto si es formal pero en no ...


5

I think you are confused because you are mixing two completely unrelated concepts. The concept of "bad words" or vulgarities is a social concept, which varies greatly from region to region, and can often be influenced by local laws (i.e. certain English words cannot be said on broadcast television or radio in the US). This is true in any language. The ...


4

Despite the good answers also is worth to mention the following expression: Es un dolor de cabeza. Spanish has a wide variety of ways to say the same thing (specially bad things). Usage example: Fulanito es un dolor de cabeza, siempre hace ...


4

Are there any rules regarding the use of 're'? First, as said in other answer, it's a prefix, not a word. It should be used only colloquially, in casual speak. It's emphatic and slightly childish. In general, you'll prefer 'muy'.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible