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9

Subtle... Mientras llueve, escucho música. (llueve: indicative) While it rains, I listen to music Mientras llueva, me quedaré en casa. (llueva: subjunctive ) As long as it rains, I'll stay at home. "Mientras + indicative" implies mere simultaneity (at the same time something happens, another thing takes place). "Mientras + ...


7

No, not indicative nor subjunctive. If you give an order or a request, the verb is conjugated in the imperative. The problem is that in the second person singular, the imperative has two forms depending on formality of the context Example in Latin American way: ¡Para, por favor!: you're talking to someone familiarly, without differences of rank or age. ...


4

They are different. Podría ser is could be, whereas sería is would be: Si fuera rico, podría comer ostras a diario = If I were rich, I could eat oysters every day. Si fuera rico, comería ostras a diario = If I were rich, I would eat oysters every day.


3

Don't trust song lyrics since many times they are not grammatically correct. They just try to fix themselves to the melody. If you check the lyrics first he says the sentence twice but in both ways: No importa qué diga el destino We don't know yet what it has said. (Subjunctive for supposition), and it doesn't matter what Fate can say. No me ...


1

If you want to use future subjunctive here (recall it's not used in anything but the most formal of documents), then the pattern is Si fut. subj., fut. ind.. In your example Si él charlare conmigo de nuevo, seré distante. That usage is pretty much entirely extinct in Spanish, though it is preserved in Portuguese: Se ele conversar comigo de novo, serei ...



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