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1

Unless you're telling it like a story, giving people details and a play-by-play, as if it were from a book, you would use the 2nd example.


0

Let's start with the ending: you didn't eat exclusively with your friends on the terrace, so you use the imperfect. Eating is a short event repeated an unspecified number of times, so the past perfect sounds wrong to me, unless you really ate for three years with your friends, on the terrace. The "ir a la escuela" bit is more ambiguous, you could argue for ...


0

The first thing to say is that there is no one-to-one correspondence between the tense/aspect/mood of Spanish and English verbs. Whereas English has only one simple past, Spanish has two: pretérito simple and pretérito imperfecto. In general, one can translate both the pretérito simple and pretérito imperfecto into simple past. In many cases the context is ...


0

No sabíamos que tú eras Superman We didn't know you were Superman This sentence has no definite termination point. How long did the subjects of the sentence not know this? A decade, a year, a minute? Saber is a verb often conjugated in the imperfect in its usage. It's difficult to compare/translate it to English, because in English, when we know the ...


4

Speaking from an intuitive point of view, the first one: sabía, sabías, sabía... is roughly equivalent to the English 'I used to know', an example sentence would be: Yo sabía hablar español (I used to know how to speak Spanish). Here you knew something but maybe forgot due to lack of practice. The second one: supe, supiste, supo means 'I ...



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