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8

(Trying to keep things very generic and spoiler free-ish). The person that says "Hable con ella" is a caregiver hired by one of the characters. It's a professional relationship, and usted is the proper treatment in such a context.


8

The problem is that gustar is an inverted verb, compared to English. For example: I like the food. Me gusta la comida. In Spanish the subject is "comida", while "me" is the indirect complement, while in English, "I" is the subject and "food" is the complement. So you have to use the third person imperative, and that is constructed using the ...


8

In Spanish you use the singular second person to refer to yourself in the imperative way. for Think! you will say ¡Piensa! (or ¡Pensá! in some regions of South America). You cannot say that for the first person, so you always refer to you in the second person for the imperative (I think in English is the same).


6

There's no first person singular imperative, that's why it doesn't appear in conjugation tables. I would even bet there isn't one in English. So how do you encourage yourself? By talking to yourself in the second person: ¡Céntrate! ¡Hazlo! ¡Corre!


4

Gustar can be used in the imperative, but will normally be understand as to try / taste something (its transitive meaning is experimentar, percibir el sabor, etc). For example, the Argentinian Alfonsina Storni once wrote Corre, camina, gira, sube y vuela: Gústalo todo porque todo es bello However, because the literal meaning of intransitive gustar is ...


4

In Spanish, a verb with "se" can be used as a more natural form of passive, called "pasiva refleja" (reflexed passive?). That is the case here "véase" is a form of "verse", that is the "pasiva refleja" equivalent to "ser visto". According to the conjugation, it is the third person, singular of the present tense of subjuntive. As you probably know the ...


3

You just use the second-person imperative, since you actually are speaking to someone (and that someone happens to be you). Your example sentence would then be translated to ¡Céntrate! ¡Venga! ¡Hazlo!


2

The use of the infinitive when an imperative is required is a common error that unfortunately nowadays is spreading all around, and it happens with all verbs in imperative form in colloquial speech in Spain and other countries where the form vosotros is used in enclitic form (-os) with an imperative. From RAE FAQ It is not considered proper, in careful ...


2

All Spanish imperatives follow the subjunctive, with the sole exception of the present tense second person singular familiar (tú) positive form (and the vosotros form, in places that use it). The first person singular form is usually considered absent for imperatives, but you can use the second person familiar or the third person subjunctive which is ...


2

As far as I know, Está is not the imperative form of Estar. The sentence would be ¡Estate creativo!. El imperativo de la segunda persona del singular solo se usa en forma pronominal (estate): Estate tranquilo. According to RAE, Estar means 6 intr. Hallarse en un determinado estado. Estar triste, rico, sordo, convencido, satisfecho. In your ...


1

As it is supposed in the question, there is no imperative for third persons since you can not give orders to someone that you are not talking to directly (those others). So in such cases you use the subjunctive: Quiero que (ellos) hagan su trabajo Here you express the wish, maybe to someone that may accomplish it for you. The yell "no hables!" (or "no ...


1

What you have here is the imperative of the (pronomial)reflexive form of ver -> verse. According to spanishdict.com, it's a form used (among other occassions) in texts : http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/ver


1

The reason is not obvious but I'll try to explain it. As you say one person wants that the other change to a creative state, but implicitly wants that the change remains to modify the person's behavior. So the verb for a permanent state as you say is "Ser", not "Estar". Anyway, is that kind of things inherent to the language.


1

You can also use "Pasa la aspiradora en el dormitorio, por favor" to make it clear that you are asking for something to be done. I would prefer to make it conditional: "¿Podrías pasar la aspiradora en el dormitorio?". It is a quite polite way to ask for something and it is normally clear that it is a conditional, but you want it done. If you used "¡Pasa la ...


1

It depends on context, really. Exclamations do not necessarily denote anger, but it might indeed imply too much emphasis for a casual instruction. Some alternatives that remove the ambiguity: Juan, pasa la aspiradora en el dormitorio. Por favor, pasa la aspiradora en el dormitorio. ¿Puedes pasar la aspiradora en el dormitorio? Te encargo ...


1

Only Spain. Actually you're talking about "Castellano" which is spoken in Spain. Latin America Spanish doesn't use second person plural familiar form of the verbs. In both Spain and Latin America, the informal, second person singular verb form is tú (you). For example: “¿Quieres (tú) venir a la fiesta conmigo? Would you like to come to the party with ...



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