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I just want to add that ther's a difference between "Observo" and "Observó" Observo is present in the first person form of "To observe" [Yo observo] being "I observe". Observó is preterit in the third person form [Él/Ella observó] being "He observed".


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There are two differences going on here. One is the difference between a present participle, "lying", and a past participle, "echado". You've noticed this. The other is a subtle difference between the relationship between the man and the verb. A person takes the action of lying down. The action of "echarse" (note the reflexive form) is an action, yes, ...


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The Nobel prize Camilo José Cela once said: "No es lo mismo estar dormido que estar durmiendo, como no es lo mismo estar jodido que estar jodiendo.". The anecdote surrounding this funny quote illustrates well how the usage of gerund ("dormido", "jodido") and past partiple ("durmiendo", "dormido") don't always carry the same meaning. Apparently Cela, as ...


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It usually more useful to become familiar with the dominant patterns than going looking for "rules" that dont always exist. In the case of pronouns, the most frequent patterns usually look like this: 1. Indirect-Direct (see: Direct and Indirect Pronouns in the same construction) When direct objects and indirect objects appear together, the direct object ...


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I assume the sentence is "Observo al hombre echado en el suelo", right? For starters, "observo" is really "Yo observo" so it's actually first person (which translates to "I observe") Notice it's in present tense. "Yo observé" is the correct translation of "I observed" Now, "echado" is a common word, and a synonym of "acostado", or "tirado".. both of which ...


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Both ways are completely correct and can be used the same way to express what you meant in English. In other words: there are synonyms. Maybe you can understand it better with this translation into English: ...pero trabajo para otra empresa --> but I work for another company. However, be careful because you made a different mistake: As you can see above ...


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Mientras Pepe jugaba a el baloncesto" , well I would never say "a el baloncesto" , but I suposse it is formal spanish from Spain. "Fue primero a la farmacia". Here 'a' means to . I guess it is the same in english , in english you say " I went TO the pharmacy first " not 'IN THE PHARMARCY" "Por qué faltaste a clase" , first of all clase is considered here as ...


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Based on the context you've given, there are some other translations that might work as well based on more specific context. If you are saying that an evaluation is to be scheduled, you can instead of use simply a programar or as others have pointed out a concertar. Some other things. forma is wrong, formulario or modelo is generically better, but here ...


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"Mientras Pepe jugaba a el baloncesto" ¿What was Pepe playing? Al Baloncesto. "a el" contracts to "al" and you can remove it since "Baloncesto" is a proper noun. "Pepe jugaba el Baloncesto" doesn't sounds bad for me but I think is more proper say "Pepe jugaba al baloncesto" or "Pepe jugaba Baloncesto" I'd pick the last one. "Fue primero a la farmacia" ...


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The accepted answer isn't right. If you have te and me as two different objects, they will always go in the same order. You can only have te me, and never me te, likewise, you can never have le me, even if le is the indirect object and me is the direct object. Consider, for example, "te me acercas". te is the reflexive object, and me is the indirect. ...


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Unlike the English verb to play, the Spanish verb jugar is intransitive. Therefore, you need a preposition to introduce its complements. In this case, to introduce the game you are playing, you use the preposition a. Why is it transitive in one language and intransitive in the other? Well, that's just the way each language has evolved. In Spanish, fue can ...


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The different a's that you're asking about all have different reasons which shows just how versatile the preposition is. The verb jugar (not jagar) takes the preposition a. That's just the way it is. It's the same reason you cuidar de or tener que. It's not the a personal that's used with animate direct objects, though. The verb ir generally uses ...



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