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1

Think in this: ¿Existe ALGUIEN que haya aprobado el examen? No, no existe NADIE (que haya aprobado el examen) When you use a positive sentence you can use alguien, but when you are using a negative one you must use nadie


2

First of all, a disclaimer, the usage of 'pretérito perfecto' (se ha roto) and 'pretérito indefinido' (se rompió) varies with the region. Some regions in Spain (like Leon) and I believe most of Latin America prefer the use of 'pretérito indefinido' over 'pretérito perfecto'. Despite having said that, here I will describe the common usage in Spain. Both ...


1

This one is correct if he broke it this summer and now (3 months later) he STILL can't walk: Este verano mi vecino se rompió la pierna y no ha podido caminar por tres meses. This is correct if he broke it this summer, and he WAS not able to walk for three months (but now can): Este verano mi vecino se rompió la pierna y no pudo caminar por tres meses. This ...


1

It's a peculiarity of the English language that you have 40 minutes for lunch, but 40 minutes to eat it. In Spanish we use for (para) always, that's all. 40 minutos para el almuerzo y 40 minutos para comerlo.


2

If you use de in the sentence above, wouldn't it change the meaning to: You have one minute of choice It doesn't make much scene, but consider this: Tienes un minuto de paz / You have one minute of peace Here para is used to denote purpose, destination or need, while de is used to indicate possession. I think this difference can also be clearly seen ...


2

Doctor's and Adriano's answers are correct, but not exactly right. "Se habla español" has no direct translation to English because the language differs from Spanish. "Spanish is spoken" translates literally to "El español es hablado", even though it's not a common phrase. In Spanish you can conjugate certain verbs without having a subject. For example, ...


0

They both make sense to me even without adding "los". Might be compared to saying "any way of doing it" and "any ways of doing it" ("cualquier manera de hacerlo" and "cualesquiera maneras de hacerlo"). Now with "all": "all way of doing it" and "all ways of doing it", "toda manera de hacerlo" y "todas maneras de hacerlo". If we think of all ...


1

I will second Eric Andres's point in using "querer" with living creatures instead of "gustar." At least in much of Latin America, using "gustar" with humans usually insinuates a physical/sexual attraction. With animals, even though it's (generally) certain that you're not saying that you find the cat sexually attractive, it might sound slightly off. Best ...


2

"Se Habla Español" is the equivalent of "Spanish Is Spoken." (roy.fourson posted a good explanation on the lack of direct translation) The fact that it is spoken here is inferred, and therefore it is not necessary to write "Aqui Se Habla Español." A brief note on usage: In the USA, "Se Habla Español" ("Spanish Is Spoken Here") is very commonly used. It ...


1

As pointed in other replies, the good answer is "para ellos". "for" is almost always equivalent to "para". Just as a rule of thumb, you can use these translations if you have any doubts: "para" = "for" "por" = "by" ("Escrito por Cervantes" = "Written by Cervantes"). "a" = "to" ("Voy a Madrid" = "I'm going to Madrid") "de" = "of" ("Hecho de polyester" = ...


1

I would translate your phrase as: La carnes es su unico ingreso. Or: La carne es su unica fuente de ingresos. All the other forms sound awkward to my ear.


1

The first sentence is correct. You shouldn't pluralize "todo tipo" in this sentence. When to use something like your second sentence? Well, I could say "Tengo una plantación con todos los tipos de tomate que existen en mi país" (I own a plantation with all the types of tomato that exist in my country). "Noé trajo al arca a todos los tipos de animales" (Noah ...


1

"Policía" is also used as a collective noun, so you should use a singular form for the subjunctive. Being a past tense, you should write it as "aseguró". The complete phrase would be: La policía no se aseguró "de que" el niño no tuviera "un" arma "aunténtica" o "de que" él fuera una amenaza. "Arma" is a female noun for weapon and that's the reason why ...


1

De las tres opciones la más común es la tercera: Tus amenazas nunca me van a asustar. La primera opción también es común: Nunca me van a asustar tus amenazas. La que menos se utilizaría y hasta se escucha raro es: Tus amenazas me van a asustar nunca.


1

The reflexive form of dejar indicates that the act was unintentional. Te has dejado el paraguas en el restaurante: you forgot it there. Has dejado el paraguas en el restaurante: you left it there on purpose.


5

In Spain both are correct, at least where I live (Basque Country), but they have tiny differences. What I understand when I hear both sentences: Te has dejado el paraguas en el restaurante. If you use "te" means that the umbrella was yours, as in your sentence "You left your umbrella in the restaurant" Has dejado el paraguas en el restaurante. ...


4

The most natural sentence in Spanish would actually be "La carne es su única fuente de ingreso".


2

To make a more natural sentence in spanish, it would require you to change your phrase a little. "Meat is the only source of income for them." this time a literal translation fits better. Literal translation -> "La carne es la única fuente de ingreso para ellos"


7

The translations would be Se habla Español <> Spanish spoken (here) Hablamos Español <> We speak Spanish But these phrases are all valid, and almost interchangeable. The overall meaning is never in doubt. People typing up these signs don't normally care about the precision. Finally, "It speaks Spanish" is not translatable as "Se habla Español", ...


2

La carne es el único ingreso para ellos would be the correct one. Apparently, google translate would've given you the correct answer too. Para is usually a pretty direct translation of for, although I'm sure you could find some exceptions Check the answer below for a better translation, and maybe change whether this is the accepted answer: "La carne es ...


3

I understand your confusion, but the ambiguity there is inherent to using the word "por", which has multiple meanings. You would have to use the context to translate. Also, there would be at least another meaning, This letter was written because of Juan. However, I can say that it would be very rare to actually say that sentence with any but the first ...


3

Most likely to be heard: 1) Nunca me van a dar miedo tus amenazas. ("frighten" is a deeper kind of fear than "scare") 2) Nunca me van a asustar tus amenazas. (A threat doesn't surprise-scare you, it frightens you.) 3) Tus amenazas nunca me van a dar miedo. 4) Tus amenazas nunca me van a asustar. ... 109992) Tus amenazas me van a asustar nunca.


5

They are both right (except that you must add "los" as seen below) depending on what you mean. It depends on whether you grow vegetables of any type you want, or you grow vegetables of every type possible (which are not the same thing): Cultivo de todo tipo de verdura. = You grow what you feel like. Cultivo todos los tipos de verdura. = You really grow ...


1

"Has dejado el paraguas en el restaurante" is not less correct, and it is the way that it is used in Mexico. There are differences in usage in different countries, but all countries will understand you either way you say it. Also, it is always "paraguas", that is the name of the object: "un paraguas, dos paraguas".


2

"No existe nadie." In Spanish, once you use a negative in a sentence, everything else must also be negative in that sentence. This is different from English, since it does not allow double negatives, while in Spanish, double negatives are required.


1

a literal translation of that phrase would depend of the context IF its about a movie, the phrase would be changed to something more specific Por pudor nunca besaría frente a las camaras. Out of modesty, she would never kiss in front of the cameras. IF its about kissing your screen(tv, monitor) Por pudor nunca besaría la pantalla. Out of modesty, she would ...


3

both are valid sentences estuve enfermo would be heard as polite excuse, ie. (At the office, explaining to colleagues about your sick leave), Estuve enfermo la semana pasada {I was sick the last week} estaba enfermo something that you would say to friends, ie (with friends and family), estaba enfermo y ya estoy bien {I was sick, now I'm great}


0

Ambas son correctas gramaticalmente, depende del contexto y el uso que quieras hacer de ellas una es más correcta que la otra. Por ejemplo “no existe nadie” o “no existe alguien” podrían usarse en preguntas indirectas. Con la diferencia entre ellas que la doble negación enfatiza lo comunicado.


-1

Lo correcto sería decir "No existe nadie" tal y como comenta @frandevel


0

Es correcto decir "No existe nadie". La doble negación en español es una forma de enfatizar lo que se intenta comunicar.


-1

Lo correcto sería decir "No existe nadie que haya aprobado el examen".


2

From the second set of examples, only the second one is correct. Unless you're using proper nouns ("nombres propios"), you need to use articles to construct your sentences. La manzana es una fruta. Manzana is not a proper noun, so it needs the article. If an apple were to be assigned a name, say, its name is Ana (yeah, as in "Ana la Manzana"), then you ...


3

Yes, it is correct, the subjunctive is the correct verbal time that you need to use there, as both actions were ocurring in the past but at the same time or shortly after. Here, some uses of the "preterito imperfecto de subjuntivo" form are explained: http://espanol.lingolia.com/es/gramatica/tiempos-subjuntivo/preterito-imperfecto (I think this one is the ...


1

For the first set both are correct. Because water is uncountable. I can't find a counterexample for uncountable nouns. For the second set only the second one is correct. For countable nouns you need an article. Another options would be (for plural): Las manzanas son frutas / Las manzanas son unas frutas.


2

In Mexico, I think hear el próximo año the most, followed by el año siguiente. I don't know if I've ever heard el año que viene, but I would understand it if I did. But Mexico is a big place, and it may vary widely by region.


1

They are both interchangeable. Both will be understood to be the same thing. Everything depends on the speaker, and what he/she wishes to say. Saying el año que viene would suggest that the new year is approaching though. That is the only difference. el año próximo is a very generic way to say next year. año que viene would be more like The upcoming year


1

That's a good occasion to use the verb "permanecer". Otherwise, in spanish, "ser" is used as a way to describe the long-run state, while "estar" is used for short-run, varying properties. Similarly we use "estar" when we describe what we now do ("estoy pensando"), while we use "ser" for inherent properties and actions of the subject.


2

I would translate the original sentence, We must turn off the faucet and save water. as "Debemos cerrar el grifo y ahorrar agua", but more likely, as @fedorqui comments, I would write "Debemos cerrar el grifo para ahorrar agua", as "ahorrar agua" is the reason we must "cerrar el grifo".


3

It is appropiate. This "a" would translate the english "to". Due to = debido a .What follows "a" is the reason always. Example: "Debido a un corte de luz" -> Due to an electricity outage. "an electricity outage" is the reason for the cut. Try always to transform this kind of sentences into: "An electricity outage was the reason for ..."


3

The other answers point out an ambiguity in your original sentence: when should the cellar be dark and dry? I'd rephrase the original question as The wine cellar should always be dark and dry. That translates cleanly to La bodega siempre debe estar oscura y seca. and I think it's a sentence you're more likely to actually hear when talking ...


2

The correct translation is Por pudor nunca besaría en pantalla


2

El joven encontró trabajo después de muchas pruebas. Es correcta pero parecería que has tenido que pasar pruebas (u exámenes) ya sean psicológicos, médicas, de aptitud, de actitud... o como en muchas entrevistas de trabajo pruebas de selección. Para traducir struggle en el sentido de lucha ante una adversidad me decantaría por tu segunda opción El joven ...


1

First, those equivalences are not right, it should be: Should is the equivalent of debería. Must is equivalent of deber. Have to is equivalent of tener que/haber que Ought to is equivalent of tendría que Those are the proper equivalences. I would not point any difference since I think they are quite similar in use. But I find that ought to is tricky when ...


2

Think of "ser" as a inherent property of the subject, and "estar" as a temporal property. So if somebody "is handsome" can be "es guapo" or "está guapo", the first meaning he is a handsome person always and the second one that he looks handsome at that moment.


2

In my opinion, it should be the first one, but actually, it could be both depending on the case. I guess that wine cellars, in general, have to be dark and dry. So if you are talking about a general case it should be the first one. Let's put it this way: All wine cellars should be dark and dry. Las bodegas deberían ser oscuras y secas. In the ...


6

I am turning 30. Voy a cumplir treinta años. I just turned 30. Acabo de cumplir treinta años.


2

Here are some correct choices: Al gato le gusto yo Yo le gusto al gato Le gusto al gato (you can ommit the article "Yo" because there's no other article that can be used in this specific sentence)


1

If I had to say the way that sentence would be said in Spain, I'd go for: Hoy va a pasar algo grande I think that'd the usual ordering of the words. I can't say for how they would say in other spanish-speaking countries. However, there are other words that you could use depending on the tone you want to achieve. You could go for importante, if it's a ...


2

I would say that something big is perfectly translateable as algo importante. However algo grande is also a good way to say it. Then: Something big is happening today Could be: Algo grande va a ocurrir hoy Algo importante va a ocurrir hoy However, I remember this something big in some other kind of sentences that try to give more importance to the ...


3

el gato me gusta I like the cat. me gusta el gato I like the cat. The translator is correct - both sentences mean the same thing. The correct way to say "The cat likes me" would be this way: Yo le gusto al gato Al gato yo le gusto Essentially, this would translate back into English as "I [am] liked by the cat" or "By the cat, I [am] ...



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