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Another thing you may be hearing is in phrases where an object comes after que: Le gustará más a ella que a mí. In this case, you do need mí because it's to me. No doubt this is probably what you heard, but because in English we've had a tendency to shift than to a prepositional status making me most common whether as subject or object in such ...


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Mi is an adjetivo posesivo (like tu, su, nuestro, etc.) Mí, notice the diacritic, is a pronombre personal preposicional. For example: Esta carta es para mí. This letter has been sent to me. However, yo is also a pronombre personal, but it is a pronombre personal no preposicional. For example: Creo que yo puedo hacerlo. I think I can do it. Your ...


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I don't really know where you have seen someone use 'mi' as a noun, but, as a native Spanish speaker, I can say that they're wrong using it that way. 'Mi' is the possessive pronoun. To expand on what Diego Alonso said, 'mí' is a personal pronoun. As a general tip, translate it to English and see if it makes sense. He has more books than *my*. It makes as ...


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That's wrong. It should say "Él tiene más libros que yo". You can use "mi" as pronombre posesivo, as your first example, but to use it as a pronombre personal it needs the accent. "Mi amigo se alegra por mí". First one is posesivo (my friend / el amigo mio). The second stands for the person who is talking (me / yo). or Cuando digo mi ...


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The article: Definition: It is a part of the sentence that is placed in front of the noun to indicate gender, number or if the noun is identifiable to the listener. Types: Definite article: It indicates that its noun is a particular one (or ones) identifiable to the listener. Examples: el, la, lo, los, las Indefinite article: It indicates that its ...


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There is no real difference between your two phrases, both include the preposition a and the article el, and for the same resasons. About the a preposition, in Spanish (in English, too) there are verbs that are usually used with a given preposition. Which preposition? you just have to memorize them. But note that when translating between English and ...


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Nico explains the first question very well. To anwser your second question, la ve refers to la cara, as part of the supposition we're making about what could it be that is hitting us, and not to the unknown object itself. As cara is feminine, the rest of the sentence has to match it.



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