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10

No lo considero un pleonasmo ni un anglicismo. Más bien creo que la situación es muy parecida en ambos idiomas: los dos sentidos de "have" (poseer) y "have to" (estar obligado a) son análogos a "tener" y "tener que". Yo preferiría decir, en lugar de "tienen que tener" , "deben tener" o "tienen que poseer" o "están obligados a poseer", pero lo haría para ...


10

Ok, I must confess, at first I thought the question wouldn't make sense, but it does and actually it's quite interesting. In Spanish adjectives, possessives pronouns, and so on are declined according to the noun they qualify. In this case, nuestra is qualifying madre, which is always feminine (unless..., no, always feminine). Let's compare with other ...


9

El gato es suyo. Can have four meanings depending upon who you're talking to or the context: The cat is yours (formal speaking, if you're using 'Usted' as the person) The cat is his The cat is hers The cat is theirs El gato es tuyo. Can only mean: The cat is yours


8

As Flamma explained they are not quite the same thing. Tan will usually involve some sort of comparison between, your daughter in this case, and something else, be it another person or thing, and actually even a hypothetic idea of beauty, if you said: Mi hija es tan bonita. You would be saying that My daughter is so pretty. If it was a negative: Mi hija ...


8

Vamos a entender a la maestra. In the case of a la maestra, la is a definite article (femenino singular->feminine singular) that you put before of a noun to indicate this noun is known to the speaker. Vamos a entender al maestro. al is the contraction of a el and el is a definite article (masculino singular->masculine singular) that you put before ...


8

The translations would be Se habla Español <> Spanish spoken (here) Hablamos Español <> We speak Spanish But these phrases are all valid, and almost interchangeable. The overall meaning is never in doubt. People typing up these signs don't normally care about the precision. Finally, "It speaks Spanish" is not translatable as "Se habla Español", ...


7

Yo propondría las siguientes variantes: como oración subordinada: Para empezar la lección, la profesora levanta una gran bolsa de corazones de caramelo y le pregunta a los niños, en su experiencia previa, qué saben ellos. O como cita textual: Para empezar la lección, la profesora levanta una gran bolsa de corazones de caramelo y le pregunta a los ...


7

El DPD dice lo siguiente: 2.Existen dos formas para el comparativo de bueno: a) mejor. Procede del comparativo latino melior y se usa en todos los significados de bueno antes referidos, aunque en los sentidos de ‘bondadoso’ y de ‘gustoso o apetecible’ se emplea con preferencia más bueno (→ b):[...] b) más bueno. Se emplea con preferencia ...


7

In short: you can not. In long: in english, 'that' may be understood even when not present. In spanish, it must be present as the introducing particle. Note that even changing it for a comma changes meaning: "Es un juego que hay que jugar" -> "It is a game that one must play" "Es un juego, hay que jugar" -> "It is a game so one must play"


7

Absolutely interchangeable as radpin states in his answer. I agree. However, I'd add that empezar is a little more common than comenzar. Actually Ngrams says in written Spanish, in the last 60 years, the frequency of use has been reversed. That is And comenzar is slightly more formal. But I have no other sources than native speaker's gut.


7

The RAE dictionary says this about "lenguas hermanas": ~s hermanas. 1. f. pl. Las que se derivan de una misma lengua madre; p. ej., el español y el italiano, que se derivan del latín. So, I think your translation is correct. But I think the last part of the sentence is not very correct. I would say: El portugués y el castellano son lenguas ...


7

That dot/period . means the dialogue start, now days is more common the use of - dash desfiguraban, dio una gran voz, diciendo: //narration . ¡Jesús! ¿Qué es lo que veo? //dialogue Y con el sobresalto se le cayó la vela de las manos; y, //narration How I know is used now days is: desfiguraban, dio una gran voz, diciendo: //narration ...


7

If this is an entire sentence, this is clearly a case of two different words that happen to be written the same. [Él/ella] vino [a verb] con vino [a noun]. Hence "She came with wine" Here are two more nice examples of the same. Q: --¿Usted no nada nada? A: -- Yo no traje traje. -- You don't swim, do you? -- I did not bring a swimsuit. Nada (a ...


7

In Spanish the complete answer is: La camisa es de color azul. You can not make it a word by word translation into English. This is simply how it is in Spanish: when you're talking about the color property of a thing it is always constructed as "<thing> is of <such> colour". Of course the answer is usually (but not always) shortened as: ...


7

In your example that interjection doesn't fit quite well. Let me explain. Concerning Mexico –the only country I've heard this word in, but the range of the usage is often spread by media– it isn't offensive at all. But the word itself doesn't sound very educated: never use it if you are trying to be formal. You could say it or hear it very often in the ...


7

Why is "trabajar" being conjugated to the "yo" form? The short answer is: no, "trabajar" is not being conjugated there. In fact, in "años de trabajo duro", "trabajo" is not a verb, it is a noun. Here are a few examples of use of "trabajo" as a noun: Mi equipo aprecia mi trabajo (My team appreciates my work) María está en el trabajo (Mary is at work) El ...


6

Se trata de una forma muy poco usada pero válida. DPD, artículo “que”, sección 2.1.2: Cuando la oración subordinada funciona como complemento directo de un verbo de «ruego» o «temor», se suprime a veces la conjunción que: «Le rogué me permitiera acompañarla hasta la entrada» (Cano Abismo [Col. 1991]); «Ya me temo no termine nunca [esta guerra]» (Umbral ...


6

The sentence has more than one translation because the gender is not clear. The translation could be: He reads her a journal She reads her a journal You read her a journal If the gender is not clear it does not refer implicitly "usted". And the translation of "diario" is journal not book. Book is a 'libro'. So except of the word 'diario', the ...


5

Dejar has lots of meanings: let, abandon, quit, lend, allow, release... As you can see in the definition, the third meaning is: tr. Consentir, permitir, no impedir. So it means, literary "permitir", in its sense of "to not prevent" or "to allow". In this case, they're synonyms, and as such, fully interchangeable. Obviously, with other meanings, they ...


5

In Spanish when the direct object is a person and is not given by pronoun it always bare the article «a». Always. La semana pasada vi a la tía de mi esposo. La semana pasada la vi. If you repeat the pronoun for emphasis, then you also add «a». La semana pasada la vi a ella. Sometimes it is also required when the object is animate, particularly ...


5

"Muy" is superlative, like "very". "Tan" is comparative, like "as". Mi hija no es muy bonita => My daughter is not very pretty. // It's an absolute valuation of her beauty. Mi hija no es tan bonita => My daughter is not as pretty. // It's a comparison, a relative valuation: She is not as pretty as you said, or she is not as pretty as your daughter.


5

La palabra caray es un eufemismo derivado de carajo. En español tenemos unos cuantos, como ondia (por hostia), jobar o jopé (derivados de joder)... En todos estos casos, el eufemismo se considera aceptable en casi cualquier situación, mientras que las exclamaciones originales se consideran malsonantes. Por supuesto, las malsonantes se usan mucho, pero hay ...


5

Of course the second one is the right way, el without the accent is an article and él with the accent is a pronoun, which in this case is the one that you should use. Update: el => article (the) él => 3rd person pronoun (he/him) tu => posesive (yours) tú => 2nd person pronoun (you) So, to construct the sentence you're asking for, you will ...


5

Segun RAE: Unido a aquí, ahí y allí, o con los pronombres me, te, la, le, lo, las, los, se usa para señalar o mostrar a alguien o algo. y segun wikitionary: Unido a un pronombre personal clítico ("me, te, le, nos, os, les") o a un adverbio de lugar ("aquí, allí, ahí", etc.), señala la presencia o existencia de algo. En ambos casos lo señalan como ...


5

They are both right (except that you must add "los" as seen below) depending on what you mean. It depends on whether you grow vegetables of any type you want, or you grow vegetables of every type possible (which are not the same thing): Cultivo de todo tipo de verdura. = You grow what you feel like. Cultivo todos los tipos de verdura. = You really grow ...


5

In Spain both are correct, at least where I live (Basque Country), but they have tiny differences. What I understand when I hear both sentences: Te has dejado el paraguas en el restaurante. If you use "te" means that the umbrella was yours, as in your sentence "You left your umbrella in the restaurant" Has dejado el paraguas en el restaurante. ...


4

A mi parecer, en la primera oración el Me implica un sentido de pertenencia que indica que lo que se va a probar va a ser en uno mismo. Por ejemplo, podría referirse a un: Abrigo Sombrero Zapato Disfraz Cinturón, etc. Mientras que la segunda oración es menos directa, e implica que lo que se va a probar no va a ser directamente en uno mismo. Por ...


4

Your initial statement is not entirely true, though it almost is. The sentence Messi es mejor futbolista que yo is strictly true, but you would get funny looks if you said that. The reason is that the comparison implies that both terms are, well, comparable. This nearly answers your second question. Why would you need to compare two things when they are ...


4

Las declinaciones empezaron a perderse ya con el latín vulgar y en romance, pasando de cinco a tres, sobre todo por perdida de la "m" en acusativo y el cambio de la "u" final en "o" (a ambas cosas, por ejemplo, "amicus" acabará siendo" amigo"). Como esta simplificación acabaría por producir confusiones, fueron sustituidas por preposiciones, que expresaban ...


4

Firstly: a mí and yo are not interchangeable. I would like to see the websites that claim that. The word «mí» means “me” when preceded by a preposition (except «con» which becomes ̣_«conmigo»_), so «a mí» means “to me”. When use as indirect object usually the first person will use the non-prepositional object pronoun «me». Compare: «Juan le dio la ...



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