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Doctor's and Adriano's answers are correct, but not exactly right. "Se habla español" has no direct translation to English because the language differs from Spanish. "Spanish is spoken" translates literally to "El español es hablado", even though it's not a common phrase. In Spanish you can conjugate certain verbs without having a subject. For example, ...


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"Se Habla Español" is the equivalent of "Spanish Is Spoken." (roy.fourson posted a good explanation on the lack of direct translation) The fact that it is spoken here is inferred, and therefore it is not necessary to write "Aqui Se Habla Español." A brief note on usage: In the USA, "Se Habla Español" ("Spanish Is Spoken Here") is very commonly used. It ...


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If you use de in the sentence above, wouldn't it change the meaning to: You have one minute of choice It doesn't make much scene, but consider this: Tienes un minuto de paz / You have one minute of peace Here para is used to denote purpose, destination or need, while de is used to indicate possession. I think this difference can also be clearly seen ...


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First of all, a disclaimer, the usage of 'pretérito perfecto' (se ha roto) and 'pretérito indefinido' (se rompió) varies with the region. Some regions in Spain (like Leon) and I believe most of Latin America prefer the use of 'pretérito indefinido' over 'pretérito perfecto'. Despite having said that, here I will describe the common usage in Spain. Both ...


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It's a peculiarity of the English language that you have 40 minutes for lunch, but 40 minutes to eat it. In Spanish we use for (para) always, that's all. 40 minutos para el almuerzo y 40 minutos para comerlo.


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This one is correct if he broke it this summer and now (3 months later) he STILL can't walk: Este verano mi vecino se rompió la pierna y no ha podido caminar por tres meses. This is correct if he broke it this summer, and he WAS not able to walk for three months (but now can): Este verano mi vecino se rompió la pierna y no pudo caminar por tres meses. This ...


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I will second Eric Andres's point in using "querer" with living creatures instead of "gustar." At least in much of Latin America, using "gustar" with humans usually insinuates a physical/sexual attraction. With animals, even though it's (generally) certain that you're not saying that you find the cat sexually attractive, it might sound slightly off. Best ...



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