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8

I'll go with #3: Las vocales forman su plural añadiendo -es: a/aes, e/es (también ees), i/íes, o/oes, u/úes. A las consonantes, en cambio solo se les añade -s: be/bes, ce/ces, de/des, efe/efes, ge/ges, hache/haches, jota/jotas, ka/kas, ele/eles, eme/emes, ene/enes, eñe/eñes, pe/pes, cu/cus (de la letra “q”), erre/erres, ese/eses, te/tes, uve/uves, ...


7

That's wrong. It should say "Él tiene más libros que yo". You can use "mi" as pronombre posesivo, as your first example, but to use it as a pronombre personal it needs the accent. "Mi amigo se alegra por mí". First one is posesivo (my friend / el amigo mio). The second stands for the person who is talking (me / yo). or Cuando digo mi ...


6

The difference is quite simple: bien is an adverb, while bueno/a is an adjective. You should use bien when it stands alone (esto está bien), when it modifies verbs, specially the participle (esto está bien escrito) or as an intensifier, more or less equivalent with muy (lo tenemos bien difícil, equivalent to lo tenemos muy difícil). You should use bueno/a ...


5

Generally, we specify the subject for emphasis. Using your examples: Soy alto (inteligente, moreno, etc.) In this sentence, I am specifying one of my characteristics, which are the important part of the sentence. I don't need to specify the subject, since it is inferred from the verb. Yo soy alto (inteligente, moreno, etc.) Subtly different: once ...


5

In addition to number #3 (which is the standard as Diego details), also acceptable would be seis letras a ocho letras m una letra x In this construction, letra(s) becomes the primary noun, and a/m/x become juxtaposed nouns (and functions as an adjective) which obviates the need for pluralizing them since juxtaposed nouns are normally invariable in ...


3

Aunque can be followed either by subjunctive or indicative, with a subtle difference in meaning. Aunque tengo que buscarlos en las cárceles, los encontraré They are found in the jails, and although that may make things difficult, I shall find them. Aunque tenga que buscarlos en las cárc5les, los encontraré Whether or not I may need to search the jails, I ...


2

Mi is an adjetivo posesivo (like tu, su, nuestro, etc.) Mí, notice the diacritic, is a pronombre personal preposicional. For example: Esta carta es para mí. This letter has been sent to me. However, yo is also a pronombre personal, but it is a pronombre personal no preposicional. For example: Creo que yo puedo hacerlo. I think I can do it. Your ...


2

I don't really know where you have seen someone use 'mi' as a noun, but, as a native Spanish speaker, I can say that they're wrong using it that way. 'Mi' is the possessive pronoun. To expand on what Diego Alonso said, 'mí' is a personal pronoun. As a general tip, translate it to English and see if it makes sense. He has more books than *my*. It makes as ...


2

Revision So so... almost correct. Let's go to check them one by one: In the first sentence: My parents made me clean my room before allowing me to go out with my friends. The translation is almost correct. It sounds very formal and quite artificial: Mis padres me obligaron a limpiar mi habitación antes de permetirme salir con mis amigos. To me, ...


2

This is a working answer — there will be updates to it (I'll remove this when I think it's done). Throughout this, I use the standard asterisk in front of a statement that is not grammatical. 1. What is a determiner? A determiner is a word that goes with a noun let's us know which, if any, (out of all of those nouns in the whole of existance), we're ...


2

Though it is true that the structure of se habla using se before the third person singular of the verb is seen in reflexive constructions, this is not the case in the example that is being discussed here. You wouldn't say El se habla castellano. You would say El habla castellano. He speaks Spanish. The pronoun or particle se has many uses, one of which is ...


1

The difference between ser/estar resides in the transitiveness of the adjective. I am a man, and that is not going to change, so : Soy un hombre I am sitting on my computer, but I can stand up: Estoy sentado en mi ordenador. La bolsa está rota, pero antes estaba sana. Es una bolsa, y siempre será una bolsa. Please read about transitive and ...


1

While bien can also describe nouns like adjectives do, it's use implies the epitome of good in whatever genre of context it is in. ¡Que bueno! vs ¡Qué bien! Think of the difference between That's good and F**k yeah, or This place is so great/perfect for us! Bien is so stupendous that it affects both parties Sometimes you can hear it being used in place ...


1

Aquí es donde la morfología entra en acción morph(del griego forma) y logía (ciencia) Definición de morfología por la RAE: Parte de la gramática que se ocupa de la estructura de las palabras. Así pues morfología de los determinantes sería correcto: Determinante: Se suele llamar determinante a una función sintáctica desempeñada por diversos tipos de ...


1

Ben, it is a little bit difficult for me to understand your question. By reading the title (Translate from Spanish to English) I thought you were on the wrong stack (site). Also, did you mean offer o officer? Ask, in that context could be Preguntar (por) (Pregunté a un policía dónde podía conseguir una taza de té ) or Pedir (pedí al camarero una ...


1

Another thing you may be hearing is in phrases where an object comes after que: Le gustará más a ella que a mí. In this case, you do need mí because it's to me. No doubt this is probably what you heard, but because in English we've had a tendency to shift than to a prepositional status making me most common whether as subject or object in such ...



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