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2

It is the way I would translate it too. Sounds perfectly correct to me. Would be OK too (to expand a little bit my answer): Un enigma que envuelve un misterio or Un enigma que encierra un misterio or even un enigma dentro de un misterio (Although this is less close to your original sentence) Actually in Spanish we say that mysteries ...


1

Leí esa parte y definitivamente le falta una a. En esa parte Melquíades rompe un frasco de bibloruro de mercurio, ella le reclama por el olor, Melquíades hace una explicación/juego como acostumbraba y es donde viene la frase. Siempre didáctico, hizo [Melquíades] una sabia exposición sobre las virtudes diabólicas del cinabrio. Úrsula no le hizo caso, ...


0

indefinite articles (un, una) are used only before modified nouns, that is nouns followed by adjectives. False. The usage, as well as the difference in usage, of definite and indefinite articles has no dependency on whether or not the following word is a modified noun or a noun. They're both the same thing, a noun. 'Modified Noun` is itself, a ...


3

Primero, hay que recordar que se solo tiene interpretación indirecto si le sigue un pronombre átono directo. No puede representar los niños, porque si se fuese reflexivo con referencia a ellos, el verbo tendría que acordarse con los niños, pero está en singular. Creo que necesitaría algo más de contexto para estar seguro pero... Para mí, les llevó a los ...


1

indefinite articles (un, una) are used only before modified nouns, that is nouns followed by adjectives. I think that this is not true. A modified noun with "una": una casa roja (=a red house) An unmodified noun with "una": una casa (=a house) Both sentences are perfectly valid in Spanish. And, regarding modified and unmodified nouns, definite ...


0

I'm not a language teacher nor a linguist but I think your teacher is wrong or you missunderstood something. I've seen a dog He visto un perro Perro is not a modified noun (appart from being indefinite) there but it is not a particular dog so we use indefinite article. I've seen the (same than last week) dog He visto el perro For the ...


2

Explicación exhaustiva del uso de se. Yo lo incluiría en en caso dativo o intensificador del verbo: A veces, el pronombre reflexivo sirve únicamente para intensificar el significado del verbo, en construcciones transitivas o intransitivas. La frase original debería ser "Ursula no le hizo caso, sino que se llevó a los niños a rezar". En cuanto a la frase ...


4

English It's a passive relative infinitive clause, using the RAE's terminology. It's relative, as it's introduced by a relative que (this also, in effect, makes it an adjectival clause). It's passive, because noun that comes before it is the one that is to be acted upon by the verb (*misión is to be cumplida, rather than to cumplir something else). It's ...


1

Personally, I would definitely call it a "special construction". Tener que, and Hay que, both use this form of qué to indicate necessity. There's no literal way to translate that I know of. The fact that the verb tener is present suggests necessity, like I mentioned. Hay qué on the other hand uses an auxiliary verb, haber, to emphasize the necessity. ...


1

I think that it is not an special construction, and that you can not analyse cosas que without the verb before it (in this case tener). The following sentences are equivalent: Tengo reportes que revisar, (tengo) informes que imprimir y (tengo) cartas que redactar Tengo que revisar reportes, (tengo que) imprimir informes y (tengo que) redactar cartas I ...


3

¿Has probado el Diccionario Esencial de la RAE? En los ejemplos de uso suelen escribir con mayúsculas las preposiciones propias de cada verbo: "Soñe CON ella", "Pensé EN ella", "Hablé DE ella". Naturalmente, no aparecen todas. Muchas preposiciones con su significado propio genérico se pueden usar con casi cualquier verbo: "Soñé sin ti", "Comí sin ti", ...


1

Indeed, there are rules, but it is important to distinguish between the rules that govern Standard Spanish (which should be used in formal communication) and informal or dialectal Spanish — which still have rules, just different from the standard. In general, the following table explains when to use each of the object pronouns in third person: ...


5

That sentence is not a (blatant) question, but is a indirect interrogative sentence. Los Dursley se estremecían al pensar qué dirían los vecinos si los Potter apareciesen por la acera is equivalent to Los Dursley se estremecían al pensar (o pensando): ¿Qué dirán los vecinos si los Potter aparecen por la acera? There is your question, and that is ...


4

Some of the other answers provide solid practical information, but I'm going to get into some of the nitty gritty of it :) When you say La camisa es azul, you have three parts: subject, copula verb, and predicate adjective. Here's it and some others broken down: El librosuj. parecev.cop. interesantep.adj.. La sopasuj. estáv.cop. fríap.adj.. La camisasuj. ...


7

The -ón(a) ending (along with -azo/a and -ote) is what's called an augmentative. Essentially, it's a bigger or more intense version of the base word (and the opposite of a diminuitive like -ito/a and similar). Using gato you get: small cat: gatito, gatillo, gatín, etc cat: gato big cat: gatón, gatazo, gatote You can do the same with other words like ...



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