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I agree with the other answers but I would like to add something else: "Bien" can be used as an adjective in a few occasions (at least in Spain). It means "affluent" or "high social position", or even "snob". So, "una casa bien" means a wealthy home (not a house in this case). You can use it also to refer to people, "niña bien", for example. Be careful ...


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Unfortunately, when it comes to languages, the answer to the question "Why?" is often quite simply because. Indeed, etymologically speaking, the nouns ending in -nte are derived from the old active participle1 and that participle — and its modern adjective form — is invariable with respect to gender (but not number), by which we would expect the feminine ...


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I would like to go beyond this specific question for presidente. In spanish, ente is a noun by itself, wich means entity. The definition of both are obviously the same, something that exists, real or in essence. In spanish, ente is used to personify a verb, almost like a suffix (ente and ante): Presidir (verb, to preside), so the person who presides is the ...


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Answering why 'presidente' and 'presidenta' seem to be now widely accepted forms, would require more than just quoting RAE's present definition of these terms or their historical usage in certain parts of the Ibero-American territories. Furthermore it can't be concluded, because it is not always a norm, that a generic noun which accepts both genders via 'El' ...


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¿Cómo va? or ¿Cómo te va? are very used in spanish language. Normally there's not big difference between those. The first one is used for people who just are not used to communicate using the proper pronoun As for va, it's commonly used for "progress," cómo te está yendo, cómo te ha ido. here you have a continuous and past participle way to express ...


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I would add "como" to the answers given for it to be more commonly used expression. Hablo lo suficiente como para que valga la pena ir I find "para que vaya a valer la pena ir" too complicated for normal use, although is perfect grammar. Moreover, I would short the sentence even more if I were speaking Hablo lo suficiente como para ir Finally, ...


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¿Cómo vas? Exactly the thing you say. Example: A- Me voy a Colombia B- ¿Cómo vas? A- En avión ¿Cómo te va?/¿Cómo va? You're also on a good trend here. However, it's way more general. I would summarize it uses as 1)"How do you feel (about something that's happening NOW)?" 2)"How do you do?" "What's up?" "How is it hanging?" That's why your doctor ...


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It's a bit complicated to treat in infinitive because valer is not used in this case with its infinitive. Normally, in spanish we say para que valga la pena. So the way you could rephrase it, is: Hablo suficiente para que valga la pena ir. Now, you can put lo suficientemente but it's not strongly necessary since you are already talking about the ...


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The reason you can't say what you did is because infinitives in the construction you gave usually have an implicit subject1 and for many speakers, you need subordinate it in order for it to make sense. As aprendedor mentioned, you need to add on lo with suficiente to nominalize it. But then we get: Yo hablo lo suficiente para valer la pena ir. ^ ...


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What Diego explains is correct. "Muy" is equivalent to the English adverb "very"--both modify adjectives or other adverbs ("Ella corre muy lentamente" = "She runs very slowly"; "Ella es muy tonta" = "She is very stupid"; "una chica muy popular" = "a very popular girl"). However, it's not an error in the course, as you commented. Notice that "buena" here ...


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Bueno is an adjective, while bien is an adverb. You wouldn't say una casa bien since adverbs don't modify nouns, even in Spanish. Una casa buena describes a house as being nice. Una buena casa describes a nice house, but the emphasis is on the fact that it is nice. Note that colloquially you could say, La casa está bien buena since the adverb can be ...


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Una buena casacan have also another meaning as a good brand or good store. It's not very common on young people but in senior people sometimes when a brand or a store is trusted the expression una buena casa is used: Philips es una buena casa Philips is perceived as a brand which products are reliable. Electrodomésticos Pepito es una buena casa ...


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Una buena casa would be what you would call a superb house; it's not just a good house, but rather a fine house, an indescribably great house. You can spot this extremity in the every day phrase Buenos días or, put shortly Buen día Casa bien is not correct unless you want to use an adverb, bien, meaning very thorough, or well executed, or ...


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Since you see: ¿El director les quiere dar el guión a los actores? It only refers to a singular noun, so the answer would be : "Sí, quiere dárselo.


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Dar is a transitive verb (dar algo a alguien), and the C.D. here is "el guión" (because if put in passive voice the sentence would be "El guión será dado a los actores por el director"). So, the pronoun in "dárselo/s" refer to "el guión". Since it is singular the appropriate would be "Sí,quiere dárselo". You would "darselos" if we were talking about giving ...


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"Muy" is an adverb. Thus, you use it to modify the quality of adjetives (among others) as you stated. It does stand for "very" and indeed it is used for emphasis, but as "very" in English you are not forced to use it every time. You could either say Eso es una buena idea That is a good idea Eso es una muy buena idea That is a very good idea In ...


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neither and not even aren't equal in spanish language. Normally these mean tampoco and ni siquiera I didn't even like these, neither those. Here we say "ni siquiera me gustaron estos, tampoco esos." If we want to use ni siquiera, we need to put I didn't even like these, not even those. Which means "ni siquiera me gustaron estos, ni siquiera ...


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Because Ni means Nor or Neither Ni siquiera / Nisiquiera means neither or not even An example of the difference with rough translation No me gustan los tacos sucios a mi. That is very straightforward... I don't like dirty tacos, but when you say this Ni me gustan los tacos sucios a mi. It implies that I don't like other things. Ni functions as ...


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As a rule, indirect objects must be preceeded with either a or para.1. Also as a rule, direct objects (like subjects) are bare. That means they can be quickly identified in sentences because they have no preposition introducing them. Direct objects have two exceptions, though: If the direct object is anthropomorphized (a person, or something we see as a ...


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En mi humilde opinión (In my humble opinion) Miro a lo lejos (I look yonder) y veo al niño de negro. (and see the boy in black.) Abrigo en mal estado (Shabby coat) "Lamentable abrigo" ondeando al viento. (flapping in the wind) Extendí mi mano (I put forth my hand) hacia el vidrio. (and touch the glass.) Y me di cuenta que ...


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Could you give us an example of a sentence where your teacher's suggestion applies? I'm spanish and I cannot figure out what your teacher means... UPDATE: Ok, now I see; when a person receives the benefit or damage (beneficio o daño in spanish) of an action (which is called the Indirect Object IC, or Dativ in German), a preposition is required, to indicate ...


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You can use "en" when using "at" as inside a building. ¿Por qué estás en mi casa? (the subject "tu" (you) is hidden in this phrase as it can be understood from context). The preposition "a" implies direction, me voy a casa -> I'm going home The preposition "de" implies relation or posession. salgo de casa -> I'm leaving home la casa ...


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To me this is a pretty clear mistake (or at least a stylistic snafu). It's possible to say that maybe they mentally switched to thinking of "las piñas/ananases", but it would be best as singular, acompañaba, but even that stylistically that's not that great as it's a parallel structure that changes from los pueblos to la(s) fruta(s). Since the other verbs ...


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You can perfectly say tu in that case, but it would sound really weird. Instead we would use the impersonal pronoun se, as it sounds a lot more natural. In your example, it would be, "Hay muchas cosas que ver en Londres. Por ejemplo, se puede(podria) visitar El Parlamento...etc". As a general rule, we use tu almost exclusively to (informally) ...



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