Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

You can use "en" when using "at" as inside a building. ¿Por qué estás en mi casa? (the subject "tu" (you) is hidden in this phrase as it can be understood from context). The preposition "a" implies direction, me voy a casa -> I'm going home The preposition "de" implies relation or posession. salgo de casa -> I'm leaving home la casa ...


7

Your problem here is that lacks is not an adjective, but a verb. And this verb does not translate directly into another verb in Spanish; you have to use a different construction. This is similar to the verb to like, which does not translate directly into just a single verb in Spanish: I like the sea --> Me gusta el mar (not Yo gusto el mar) In your ...


7

In English you can use the -ing form of the verbs to build a noun representing the action performed by that verb. This is only one of the many uses of -ing forms. In this case, "swimming" must be translated in Spanish as what it represents in your utterance, that is to say, natación: Yo practico natación. Be very careful with literal translations, ...


5

The first sentence means How is it said; it's in a form of passive called pasiva refleja. In Spanish you can form this passive form by moving the direct object to the subject and adding se. Compare: [somebody] says Y this way → Y is said this way [alguien] dice Y así → Y se dice así The second sentence uses a pronominal verb (verbo pronominal). This is ...


4

To me this is a pretty clear mistake (or at least a stylistic snafu). It's possible to say that maybe they mentally switched to thinking of "las piñas/ananases", but it would be best as singular, acompañaba, but even that stylistically that's not that great as it's a parallel structure that changes from los pueblos to la(s) fruta(s). Since the other verbs ...


3

You can also use the very polysemic verb hacer (to do): Hago natación. Another possibility with practicar is to add the corresponding definite article to natación: Practico la natación. I'm not very sure of this, but I think that this form (with the article) is more typical of Spain as compared to Latin American varieties of Spanish.


3

You could say Yo practico natación.


3

You can perfectly say tu in that case, but it would sound really weird. Instead we would use the impersonal pronoun se, as it sounds a lot more natural. In your example, it would be, "Hay muchas cosas que ver en Londres. Por ejemplo, se puede(podria) visitar El Parlamento...etc". As a general rule, we use tu almost exclusively to (informally) ...


3

Could you give us an example of a sentence where your teacher's suggestion applies? I'm spanish and I cannot figure out what your teacher means... UPDATE: Ok, now I see; when a person receives the benefit or damage (beneficio o daño in spanish) of an action (which is called the Indirect Object IC, or Dativ in German), a preposition is required, to indicate ...


2

I think that the cuestión should be "cómo se dice vs cómo se llama", because in cómo te llamas you're using the second gramatical person and you're saying literally how are you called, but it can mean what's your name so, both phrases in the third person would be Cómo se dice -> how to say/how is sayed/ how you say Cómo se llama -> how is called / ...


2

Because Ni means Nor or Neither Ni siquiera / Nisiquiera means neither or not even An example of the difference with rough translation No me gustan los tacos sucios a mi. That is very straightforward... I don't like dirty tacos, but when you say this Ni me gustan los tacos sucios a mi. It implies that I don't like other things. Ni functions as ...


1

neither and not even aren't equal in spanish language. Normally these mean tampoco and ni siquiera I didn't even like these, neither those. Here we say "ni siquiera me gustaron estos, tampoco esos." If we want to use ni siquiera, we need to put I didn't even like these, not even those. Which means "ni siquiera me gustaron estos, ni siquiera ...


1

As a rule, indirect objects must be preceeded with either a or para.1. Also as a rule, direct objects (like subjects) are bare. That means they can be quickly identified in sentences because they have no preposition introducing them. Direct objects have two exceptions, though: If the direct object is anthropomorphized (a person, or something we see as a ...


1

En mi humilde opinión (In my humble opinion) Miro a lo lejos (I look yonder) y veo al niño de negro. (and see the boy in black.) Abrigo en mal estado (Shabby coat) "Lamentable abrigo" ondeando al viento. (flapping in the wind) Extendí mi mano (I put forth my hand) hacia el vidrio. (and touch the glass.) Y me di cuenta que ...


1

El arroz esta escaso de sal. This sentence is wrong, esta means this in female, the word for the verb to be is está, also I think that a more accurate translate would be : El arroz carece de sal. In my country (Perú) we usually say: Le falta sal al arroz. You can also say: El arroz está soso. (The rice is insipid.) I think the English word ...


1

When you translate the original sentence as El arroz escaso de sal. it lacks the verb. The verb is what tells you the action, and is one of the key components of a sentence. Imagine that I said El niño hacia el columpio Without a verb you wouldn't know if I mean "mira" or "corre" or "camina", etc. I think your confusion comes with the use of "is" ...


1

Although is fine, that's the most direct and correct translation; a comma would have been nice in the original sentence too, for it would have made the meaning clearer.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible