Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

In the lyrics the people might or might not be saying that he is a gangster. Using subjunctive keeps the uncertainty. If they had chosen the indicative, they would be stating that the people are actually saying that already. And, in both cases, although people say so, "I thank God for being where I am".


4

Como @guifa ya mencionó, las opciones ya propuestas por tu amigo español son precisamente lo que yo sugeriría. Cuando tu amigo dijo que era algo "incorrecto" se refería seguramente a que no pertenece al registro formal del idioma en España. A veces las personas mezclan algo que en realidad no es permitido por la gramática del idioma, y algo que simplemente ...


3

Qué tan [adj] funciona para muchos adjetivos. Grande, pequeño, caliente, frío, cerca, lejos... Todo lo que se pueda cuantificar.


3

ESPAÑOL (English follows) En español hay más tiempos verbales que en inglés, a veces con diferencias sutiles. Usando tu ejemplo, trataré de explicar las diferencias entre 4 posibles acciones en pasado afirmativo, excluyendo aquellas construcciones más difíciles de entender (por ejemplo el subjuntivo o el condicional). (1)- Busqué a mi perro. I looked for ...


3

Oh I know this song haha. 'que' simply means 'that' or 'because'. In English it would be translated: It's that me without you... or It's because me without you...and you without me... The 'that' or 'because' in both English and Spanish implies that he is explaining/rationalizing his thoughts. It makes it more conversational. He asks the person he is ...


3

The general way to understand it is the following: aunque + ind. "In spite of the fact that..." aunque + subj. "Regardless whether or not..." Such that aunque digan means that they may say something, they may not, but in any case (insert the rest of the sentence). Aunque dicen says that they are indeed saying something, and even so (insert the rest of ...


2

I agree completely with guillem. You can think of this in the same way as when we say in English, "even though they may/might say I'm a bandit wherever I go". Just stating in generally that he realizes that people possibly think of him in this way. This just allows for the uncertainty that guillem referred to. Just furthering his point even more, if you ...


2

When we talk about romantic relationships, sometimes we decide to use general and ambiguous words. For example: Hay otro en su vida. [There is another in her life] In this case "another" means "a man with whom she has a second relationship, probably a lover or a substitute." Creo que con María tenemos algo. [I think we have something with Mary] ...


2

The correct sentence is: "Hay otro en mi vida" Not "Hey otro en mi vida." In Spanish there is a rule that helps us determine the gender of words. Is that words ending in "a" are feminine, and words ending in "o" are masculine. When you speak of "otro" you're talking about a man (in this case), but it is always masculine form. when you speak of ...


1

The most usual relative pronoun for people is "que". Sé el primero que hace clic. But, as we are using the pronoun in the I.O. (because "gustar" asks for it), we find ourselves with a preposition. After a preposition, the presence of article depends on several things. Explanatory clause, mandatory: Mi marido, al que le gusta eso, dice... Restrictive ...


1

"otro + male noun" -> another ... "otro" -> another one


1

ESPAÑOL (English follows) Has de añadir "a" tras el verbo cuando le sigue un complemento directo. Para saber si estamos ante un complemento directo, prueba a preguntar de la siguiente forma: Ella llama a Juan. ¿A quién llama ella? He comprado un libro. ¿Qué he comprado? Como regla general: Cuando sigue un nombre propio: Ella llama a Juan. Cuando sigue un ...


1

The difference is actually that you say: The first one seems to say that the mouse was killed by something, whereas it seems the second one gives an 'update' on the liveliness of the mouse. However, you must make several corrections to your translation. "El ratón se mató" seems you were saying that the subject of the action is the mouse, and ...


1

Instead of constructing it in a manner parallel to English, I'd probably express it using a different verb. Depending on the context, the verb chosen could vary. For example, "How big is..." could be "Cuánto mide...". In the context of a restaurant, and if you're talking about how big a portion of food is for a given plate, I might say "Es mucha comida para ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible