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10

Your derivations (pan -> empanar -> empanada ; pared -> emparedar -> emparedado ) are right. There is nothing odd with the gender, though. In the sequence 1. pared (substantive; feminine ) 2. emparedar (verb ; no gender) 3. emparedado/a (participle, works as an adjective; which can in turn be substantivized) the original gender (la ...


8

As Trevor says, there's a general rule that states that nouns: ending in a are feminine ending in o are masculine However, there are exceptions, and as usual with languages, those exceptions often happen in very common words, e.g. "mano" which ends in "o" but is feminine. Then you have words with different endings (in other vowels, in consonants...) ...


7

No existe ninguna regla en los casos referidos a grupos de unidades, como no la hay en la mayoría de los casos en lo que se refiere al género de las palabras. ¿Por qué, cuando hablamos del tamaño de una persona, estatura es femenino y peso es masculino? En cambio, sí existe esta regla en el caso de los sustantivos formados por sustantivación de adjetivos, ...


6

Just to complement the good @AlexisPigeon answer, I want to make it clear that it's not el avestruz "in order to avoid two same vocals together" -which is known as cacofonía- as you said in your question... That happens with some feminine nouns such as el agua or el hacha, but in this case it's just because avestruz is a masculine noun and that's all! If ...


6

¿Quién es el jefe? --> Él Tuyo es un adjetivo posesivo que denota al sujeto de la oración, luego al ser Él el sujeto de la misma, el adjetivo debe aplicarse sobre éste. El modo correcto es "Él va a seguir siendo jefe tuyo", y si quieres evitar este tipo de problemas mejor "Él va a seguir siendo tu jefe". ;) Con una jefa: "Ella va a seguir siendo jefa ...


5

"... in order to avoid two same vocals together." You're a bit wrong here about the rules to apply in order to avoid cacofonía. Even if avestruz were female, the proper way to write it would be "la avestruz". In order to apply the "cacofonía avoid rule" (sorry for the expresion invention) you need two conditions: The word must start with an "a" (or "ha" ...


5

May I adopt a pessimistic approach? Partial answer: it could be worse. The creators of Spanish doesn't seem to be a valid expression: Spanish, as any language, evolved — and evolves! Moreover, the fact that sex concides with gender should be rather seen as a happy coincidence. Some time ago, one said la ingeniero, for women engineers. In German, for ...


4

There are a few general rules. For example, nouns ending with the letter "a" are generally feminine. But in the long-term the best way to master this is two fold: (1) memorize the article when you learn the definition, and (2) read and listen to the language as much as possible. Eventually the correct article will naturally sound "right."


3

He encontrado una regla para asignar el género a los números en el RAE. El punto número 3 de ese artículo. Más Info 3- Los cardinales, cuando son sustantivos, son siempre masculinos: el tres, un millón. Cuando funcionan como adjetivos o como pronombres carecen de variación de género, a excepción de uno y sus compuestos (→ uno, 2), que tienen formas ...


3

Marcial Prado's book "Practical Spanish Grammar" offers this mnemonic for determining noun gender: Nouns ending in L-O-N-E-R-S are generally masculine (97%). Examples: un papel, un libro, un tren, un garaje, un color, un lunes Some exceptions: una calle, una clase, una llave, una mano, una muerte, una noche, una suerte, una tarde Nouns ending in D-IÓN-Z-A ...


3

That's not incorrect and actually you asked what you shuld have to. But people use to refer to "vaso de agua" as just "agua" e.g. ¿Me da un agua de sandía? Chica, por favor. (when a standard unit is understood: e.g. vaso or jarra) Imagine the lot of times a waitress deal with the expression vaso grande/chico de agua. It's totally correct, but just ...


2

It's always the same gender, she messed it up. Being a native Spanish speaker with good orthography, I see that usually even the native speakers make silly mistakes (especially in verb conjugation), just let it pass through. Edit: Further explanation from the comments: "Quiero un vaso de agua de sandía.", Quiero un vaso de agua de sandía; el sujeto de la ...


2

First do not think about nouns as male and female. Nouns are either masculine and feminine. Most (but not all) nouns referring to male human beings and domestic animals are masculine, and most nouns referring to female human beings and domestic animals are feminine. So, the first rule: if the noun refers to a male domestic animal (toro: bull), some male ...


2

There are no guidelines because, in each case, the nouns refer to different things. Usually, a whole on one side and a constituent on the other. An emparedado is called so because it consists of some food put between two paredes (to slices of bread, in fact); there is no reason why these two paredes should have the same gender as the whole emparedado. Same ...


1

Los números son elementos abstractos sin género, por tanto utilizan el género neutro. El género neutro en castellano, a menudo, coincide con el masculino (caso de millones, cientos, miles, etc...), pero hay casos en los que no es así (decena, docena, centésima, etc...). No hay reglas para asignar género a las palabras, los conceptos abstractos pueden tener ...


1

First of all, I think you are mixing two different concepts. The English word gender does not always translate as género. In Spanish, género is a grammar category, while living organisms have sexo. Nowadays you can read or hear the word género used for the second meaning due to English influence, but it is incorrect. Sure, most words denoting male humans are ...



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