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9

Your answer can be found in section 3.2 on the Diccionario panhispánico de dudas. Below is a translation of the original text: 3.2. One adjective postposed to several nouns. When one adjective qualifies two or more coordinated nouns and is postposed to them, it is advisable to inflect it in plural and masculine if the two adjectives are of different ...


2

This question has received a number of good responses already and I see that one has already been checked as the best one, but I recently did a study on a list of 2,000 of the most frequent nouns in Spanish (which I subsequently whittled down to 1,800). I compiled it to answer this question: What percentage of nouns ending in -a are masculine and what ...


3

Here is a quick answer to a question that was a bit more challenging to answer than I had anticipated. Using my best estimates off of some pseudo-scientific research I conducted recently (link to potential paper/article and/or slide show to follow), my guess is that approximately .5 percent of nouns with feminine grammatical gender end in -o. In this study,...


1

Estoy casi seguro que no hay regla fija para eso. El encontrar tantos "suelen" en las explicaciones lo está insinuando. Citando a Wikilengua, en cuanto a la formación del aumentativo: no puede darse regla fija, a pesar de ser muy inferior su número al de los diminutivos. Es de observar, sin embargo, que la forma del aumentativo se determina por la ...


-1

That's really hard to say, I don't believe there's any "scientific" way to prove this or that. And besides that, why do you need to know the exactly percent? Would that make you speak better spanish? I like to say better that most of the nouns that end in -a are feminine and most of the nouns ending in -o are masculine. Or otherwise, few of the nouns ...


3

Actually it's not a gender reversal but a tradition that survives (inherited from latin). The complete rules are intrincate and arbitrary, kind of "well that sounds good to me", full of exceptions and even exceptions to the exceptions (see the variable use with toponyms or the "árbitra" or "árabe" cases). It is used with common names ("El ágata es una ...



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