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11

"Te va encantar" is gramatically incorrect. I had never heard it before, at least in Spain. The sentence should be: Te va a encantar as it has a future meaning Ir a + infinitive = going to + infinitive Probably it's a mistake made because we link the words when speaking so "te va a encantar" would be pronounced as "te va-a encantar", we say it ...


11

The compound verb "ir a" is roughly the same as "going to" in English: we primarily use it when talking about the immediate future. ¿Va a comprar un coche nuevo? Are you going to buy a new car? (= Have you decided to buy a new car?) Here you can find a detailed analysis of different ways to express the future. They do not elaborate on regional ...


4

The original English sentence is conditional, and the Spanish sentence provided as an answer is a conditional too. The Spanish sentence clearly conveys that something will only happen if something else happens first. The same way that is almost that you have a conditional in English when you encounter the conjunction if, in Spanish you have a conditional ...


4

No, it isn't correct. I find better to say: Pensé que querrías saber de esto. Pensé que querrías saber sobre esto. Pensé que querrías saber acerca de esto. The deference between de esto, sobre esto and acerca de esto is rather a matter of taste, mean the same, but some may seem more common than another. In my experience, the option 1 is the most ...


4

There is, indeed a regional preference. In Argentina, for example, ir a ... is almost always used in spoken language, and the future tense only appears in writing. You are likely to find the future tense used in speech in Spain, for example. Both forms are acceptable anyway.


3

In the book, Advanced Spanish Step by Step written by Barbara Bregstein, on page 188, she writes: "the simple future transmits more of a commitment or a strong decision than does the future periphrastic (ir+a+infinitive). The difference also exists in English: I will arrive at 7 p.m. is a little stronger than I am going to arrive at 7 p.m.


3

First of all it's spelled "Cuándo" and in reference to your question at least here, in Spain, both sentences mean exactly the same, we use both indifferently.


3

The question "Who built Stonehenge?" refers to something that is fixed in the past. If we stick to that fact, in spanish the same question would be "¿Quién construyó Stonehenge?" (singular) or "¿Quiénes construyeron Stonehenge?" (plural). Simple past. Now if you're debating about alternative outcomes of events that would have caused Stonehenge to not being ...


3

While you are correct when you say voy means going to, it's odd to translate it like that when there is no actual going to in your original sentence. A better approach would be: En dos años creo que trabajaré en un laboratorio. Also remember that in English you use will to change a verb to its future tense, so in this case it should also change in ...


3

The correct construction would be "voy a trabajar" (tú vas a trabajar, ella va a trabajar, etc.) The periphrastic future is "Ir a" + infinitive. The only one you needed to conjugate was the "ir", the infinitive is left invariable for all persons. Also, "creer" needs a "que" when a clause follows. Thus, "creo que voy a trabajar en un laboratorio". Edit: ...


2

¿Cuándo vendŕa? ¿Cuándo va a venir? even ¿Cuándo viene? are, for IMHO, the same. Now, if you use the first as an exclamation ¡¿Cuándo vendrá mi novia/novio?! (sight) this is another story. Of course, this last version denotes uncertainty. But in a context free text, they are the same: – Pronto nos visita la Orquesta de X en el ...


2

The first example (future) is definitely not correct. It will be correct if you truly know it won't rain: "No lloverá mañana". The second example is OK. 'Futuro' and 'Subjuntivo' are types of different facets of the verbal construction: 'Futuro' indicates tense and 'Subjuntivo' indicates mode. The future you are using is from the 'Indicativo' mode which ...


2

Tanto el condicional como el futuro refieren a acciones que acaecen posteriormente a algún tiempo. Lo que les diferencia es el punto de referencia que usan. El futuro tiene como punto de referencia ahora mismo. Es decir, si digo, imagino que ella viajará a Corea, se entiende que en algún momento entre justo ahora y un tiempo indefinido posterior a ahora, ...


1

As I understand, when you ask "¿cuándo va a venir?" you are assuming your interlocutor knows the answer. If you ask "¿cuándo vendrá?" you are asking your interlocutor to make a guess.


1

Your second example is the more common and correct way of saying it, although most of us would use "llueve".


1

I assume that the speaker is about to tell the listener that thing he thinks he wants to know. In this case, the correct verb tense is the past perfect. Additionally, if he is about to say a specific thing and not a series of things related to a single topic, we would omit the equivalent of about. All together: He pensado que te gustaría saber esto. / ...


1

Neither of them is correct. For this construction you need the subjunctive in its present form: Cuando estas facturas estén pagadas, llámame. Cuando estas facturas se paguen, llámame.


1

In Spanish, the usage of these two tenses is very similar to English. When talking in the 1st person, one difference is whether you have previously made a decision to do something, or you are making the decision at that point in time. "Your mother is sick, have you been to visit her?" "No, but I'm going to visit her tomorrow" i.e. I had already ...



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