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20

Usted comes from Vuestra Merced (later Vuesarced), meaning "Your Grace". Since this was an indirect way of addressing someone, it was inflected in the third person. That is, strictly speaking, you are not addressing the person, but "Their Grace". As time went on, the person inflection was kept, even though its origins became opaque. In a study entitled El ...


17

In Spain we would say either of these: Trátame de tú. Tutéame. Or, in a more indirect way: No me trates de usted. Any of them in a cheerful manner and usually accompanied by the perceptive "por favor" if needed.


13

Vuestra merced evolved to usted. Vuestra merced is a really antique way to say something like your highness (not literally though).


10

Puede ser para ofrecer cercanía con el publico al que se dirige. La forma usted es mucho mas formal y desde luego implica respeto, pero eso no quiere decir que la forma tú carezca de él. Creo que en este caso hay mucho contexto en el canal. Puedo decirte, como nativo hispanohablante, que usted puede tener connotaciones negativas. Cuando yo tenía alrededor ...


9

Normalmente, la fórmula correcta formal de dirigirse por carta suele ser: Estimados señores: No te preocupes si te parece muy "masculino", puesto que "señores" indica hombres y mujeres (señores y señoras). Si sabes si a quien te diriges es hombre o mujer, entonces puedes usar "estimado señor" o "estimada señora". También se suele usar: Muy señores ...


9

You'll here it quite a lot in the Andalusia region of Spain. This Wikipedia article gives a very brief coverage of it: Relaxed pronunciation / Spanish


9

In Spain, cuán is rarely used in normal, informal speech, though I think it would generally be understood. To express the same, you can use qué, or lo ... que: ¡Cuán rápidamente caminan las malas nuevas! = ¡Qué rápidamente caminan las malas nuevas! No puedes imaginarte cuán desgraciado soy = No puedes imaginarte lo desgraciado que soy In ...


8

You can say in a cheerful tone: Puedes hablarme de tú.     (You may speak to me informally) It might be helpful to precede the sentence with an encouragement word, like this: ¡Vamos! Háblame de tú.     (Come on! Talk to me informally) Please note that this applies particularly to Latin-American Spanish ...


8

I've always seen it translated as «presentar los respetos (de alguien a alguien)»: Realizar manifestaciones de cortesía a alguien. Presenté mis respetos a su esposa. —Source. And, I add, can be used ironically: «vamos a presentar nuestros respetos al nuevo alumno (knuckles cracking)» or in a more metaphorical way: «fueron al bar a presentar sus ...


7

En efecto, el uso de usted es más formal, pero no necesariamente más profesional. En América, algunas regiones al menos, desde la segunda mitad del siglo XX si no es que desde antes, el uso de deícticos sociales para marcar respeto o cortesía, concretamente la forma usted ha ido en retroceso en su uso. Anteriormente era habitual que los hijos se dirigieran ...


6

In addition to what guillem mentioned, if I am correct, this phrase is also used when someone dies, and you want to say something to the person who lost the loved one. In this case, you can say: Dar el pésame. Definiton of pésame on RAE: Expresión con que se hace saber a alguien el sentimiento que se tiene de su pena o aflicción.


5

Es una abreviatura muy extendida por gran parte de latino américa y España. Se usa sobre todo en el lenguaje coloquial y es similar al caso de las terminaciones -ado -ido ... en los verbos que suele eliminarse la letra "d" ¿Has "terminao" los deberes? No, mamá son pa' pasado mañana. En ningún caso se utiliza en el lenguaje escrito


5

The verb tutear means precisely that. Example: "oh por favor, tutéame".


5

You can use "tu mujer" when refers to your wife, but "tu esposa" is more formal. By example when I go to present my wife to another person I never say "Les presento a mi mujer" I say "Les presento a mi esposa". "Tu mujer" is not the same as "Tú, mujer", in this case "Tu mujer" is "Your wife" and "Tú, mujer" is "You, woman", because in this case you are ...


4

Surely not, or yes... ;) You can say that informally, but if you don't want to offend your friend :P When driving: ¡Frena! (Although it means "brake", it does not mean to completely stop, but slow down) ¡No vayas tan rápido/deprisa! (This is really used instead of saying "slow down". Not going so fast means that the driver has to slow down). ¡Más ...


4

I understand that both of you are using “usted” with each other. In that case, in my opinion, it's inappropriate to address them using “tú”, even if it's to ask them to use “tú” towards you. You should just politely propose that you start using “tú” between each other. Some options: ¿Nos tuteamos? ¿Por qué no nos tuteamos? Ya podríamos ...


4

I would say: "Puedes tutearme".


4

As a native speaker of English, my take on this is that, especially in advertising, the company wants to make a connection with the intended audience, and therefore will use either the formal or the informal to connect with either a older vs. younger, more hip/modern vs. traditional, or formal vs. familiar crowd. In the case of the post above, the intention ...


4

The literal translation is: A quien corresponda But it's more used in open letters (to journals for example). There are other formulas, for example: In a job application: Al jefe/a (encargado/a) del departamento de Recursos Humanos or even: A la atención del departamento de Recursos Humanos In a letter to wholesalers/ stores/... : A ...


4

I look forward to hearing from you [soon|as soon as possible|at your earliest convenience]. Regards. If we are politely demanding an answer, we could say Quedo a la espera de su respuesta [sus comentarios] Atentamente|Saludos cordiales If we want to stress that we expect a quick response we can add a la brevedad or tan pronto como le sea ...


4

Usted is grammatically third person singular, such a use is called honorific third person. Actually word usted doesn't have to be used, it's enough if you address person directly, but using 3rd person. Obviously being grammatical 3rd person singular means that the verbs need to be conjugated as 3rd person singular. Also all pronouns must be 3rd person. ...


4

A pesar de ser una expresión bastante coloquial e informal, no es tan inapropiada en el lenguaje formal como para no poder usarla. Si quieres mantener un tono muy serio en el correo sustitúyela por otra expresión (como causar problemas o aumentar la dificultad), pero no necesariamente por incluirla va a causar mala impresión. Dentro de las expresiones ...


4

"Cuan" may be an unusual word for American-Spanish talkers but in Spain is quite common, at least in the "quantitative meaning" in questions. Other uses are not very very frequent and, usually, "cuan" is substituted by other structures (not by other words). Cuan has two meanings that depend on the context, one of them is almost lost in the language. 1.- ...


4

There are many approaches for this that may depend on the context. Also, note that it is usual to use forms like "querido/a", etc. to make sure either men and women feel mentioned. So there is no need to look for a form for both. If you aim for a formal greeting, you can say: Estimado/a Estimado/a señor/a Or if you know the gener Estimado ...


4

There is actually a genderless way to translate Greetings that I can think of. You can use: Saludos, (person's name): For example: Saludos, María: Saludos, José:


3

As others have pointed, pa / pa' is a common colloquial variant for para. You will hear in Latin America and Spain. Maybe it's more extended in some places than others, for example Andalusia in Spain, but I'm sure you will find someone that uses it at least from once in a while everywhere. It is not a regionalism. And as Aracem has said, its not for written ...


3

"Vostede" (galego) & "vusté" (català) & "você" (português) all come from the same medieval expression "vo(ue)stra/vossa merced(e)/mercê," as it was customary in the Middle ages to speak to those with titles, honors or age in the third person (your honor, your highness, your grace). "Vos" is original to Latin (vous in French & voi in Italian) ...


3

Here in Argentina it's used, but it's more of an informal jargon, rather than regional.


3

Yo quiero (algo o hacer algo o que pase algo) I want (Something or To do something or Something to Happen) Me gustaría ...I'd like to/a Me toca ...Not expressing desire Me late ...Informal way of saying I'd like, people in Mexico would understand that, I'm not sure about other latin countries. Yo deseo ...I wish - Desearía.....I'd wish


3

Tutear may be what you are looking for, here. RAE entry tr. Dirigirse a alguien empleando el pronombre de segunda persona para el trato de confianza o familiaridad. U. t. c. prnl. Translation: To address someone using the second person pronoun for trust and familiarity treatment I can't recall any verb like this for usted, though. We use ...



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