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It’s a basic rule of Spanish phonotactics. In a nutshell, the structure of a Spanish syllable does not allow it: (C1 (C2)) (S1) V (S2) (C3 (C4)) A Spanish syllable consists of an optional onset, consisting of one or two consonants; a required nucleus, consisting of a vowel optionally preceded by and/or followed by a semivowel; and an optional coda, ...


6

En efecto, en español, las dos letras representan el sonido bilabial sonoro /b/. Las dos letras llegaron al español provenientes del latín, en donde sí tenían sonidos diferentes (bilabial para la b y labidental para la v) pero, en español siempre han tenido el mismo sonido, salvo por algunas excepciones regionales (por ejemplo en Valencia, en los ...


6

Spanish words can't begin with sibilant blends, so when such a word is made or borrowed, an "e" is usually prepended to mesh with the pattern of Spanish pronunciation. It's not just "sp." Some English cognates, either with common Latin origins or borrowed anglicisms: esbelto (svelte) escasez (scarcity) esfera (sphere) eslogan (slogan) esmog (smog) esnob ...


5

El desarollo de la ortografía española se debe, en gran parte, a la influencia de la Real Academia Española. Antes de la modernización de la ortografía, había mayor divergencia entre el idioma escrito y el idioma oral. (ver Wikipedia) Aunque Wikipedia asevera que la ortografía española no es fonética, sí es casi fonética en contraste con el inglés. En el ...


5

I think that transformation is only when the /h/ or /f/ is the first letter. This transformation is related (in theory) to the preromanic languages, this case it's atributed to euskara substrat that also influences de aspirated /h/ is Gascon language. Sources: Historia del español Where we found: la desaparición de f- inicial en muchas palabras que en ...


4

Debuccalization is a sound change that consists in a consonant losing its original place of articulation becoming [h] o [ʔ]. Saying place of articulation, we mean one of these: 1. Exo-labial, 2. Endo-labial, 3. Dental, 4. Alveolar, 5. Post-alveolar, 6. Pre-palatal, 7. Palatal, 8. Velar, 9. Uvular, 10. Pharyngeal, 11. Glottal, 12. Epiglottal, 13. ...


4

In a book I have on Spanish phonetics and phonology (Fonética y fonología españolas by Armin Schwegler and Juergen Kempff), this is classified as la conversión de hiatos en diptongos (interior de palabras). Some excerpts (note that not all linguistic symbols are exact, emphasis on toalla mine): Como ya hemos explicado en el capítulo anterior, en el habla ...


4

In spanish all syllables must have at least a "vowel sound" because without a vowel a consonant can't be pronounced. With vowel sound we can also add the letter "Y" in words like whisky (for syllable ky). So as all words starting with the sound "ESP"/"SP" should be divided in two syllables so S should be the first and P should belong to the next one. As the ...


4

There is an orthographic rule: a, e, o are strong vowels, i, u are weak vowels. y is like i. There can be only one strong vowel in a syllable, they never combine into a diphthong. ca-os, le-ón, le-er When a strong and a weak vowel are next to each other (or separated by h) they form a diphthong. Eu-ro-pa, hia-to, rei-na There are cases when a strong vowel ...


4

This doesn't answer the question directly but adds some related information. In Spanish dialects where an S preceding a consonant, is pronounced as an english H *, this wouldn't even be possible to pronounce, imagine pronouncing a word like Hpecial or Hparta * Argentina, Uruguay, parts of Spain and Central America, I think.


2

If you look at the reference on Wikipedia, you'll see that it's not a matter of sometimes they're fricatives and sometimes they're approximants, but rather it's that scholars seem to be in disagreement as to whether they are fricatives or approximants (altogether). In the past, they were called fricatives, but new analyses seem to indicate that they are ...


2

Español Sí, es una malformación, de donde yo provengo es como "güe", [güevos], [güeso], [güerta], pero es solo una malformación fonética ya que la manera correcta de pronunciar la palabra es [uevos], [ueso], [uerta], la letra "H" no tiene sonido en estas palabras. Sucede en todas las palabras que comienzan con hue como: hueco, huelga, huella, huelo, ...


2

Letter 's' is commonly aspirated at the end of words, and it may be aspirated as well at the end of syllabes when the next letter is another consonant. But as you said, it is common on native speakers but depends strongly on the region. Canary Islands have a strong aspiration, Cadiz has an absolute mutening of 's' at the end of words, Zaragoza use a quite ...


1

Este alfabeto está hecho para el latín, por eso hay que forzar las letras en otros idiomas donde a e i o u no alcanzan. ESTA ES LA RAZÓN: Porque el español no se apartó mucho del latín original PARA EL CUAL ESTÁ HECHO EL ABC Dario. Because the ABCD is the latin alphabet, and Spanish is so much similar to latin. But because in some part of history almost ...


1

At Spain, you'll hear people using different sounds for b and v if they grew on bilingual environments or families (talking Spanish and Catalan), since the Catalan language enforces the difference. So that occurs exactly at Valencia, Cataluña and Balearic Islands. At those islands we also have a 'nice feature' (among others) where some people are unable to ...


1

Once I posted an answer about calculating syllables in Spanish, the question was "Rules applied to the separation of syllables". A guide stated that: A diphthong is a single syllables having two vowels. It must be an unstressed closed vowel (i, u) and an open vowel (a, e, o), or two closed vowels. The possible combinations are ai, ei, oi, au, eu, ou, ...



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