Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

This answer has grown enough to require an outline. Here it is: "¿Qué hora es?" versus "¿Qué hora está?"* "estar" versus "ser" "a state" versus "an attribute" "¿Qué hora es?" versus "¿Qué horas son?" 1. "¿Qué hora es?" versus "¿Qué hora está?"* I feel tempted, like others, to write that Spanish uses the verb "ser" to ask the time, simply, because ...


11

Yo usaría Aguántate. Te aguantas. La que mejor creo que se adapta es: Vive con ello. o también puedes probar Supéralo. (no en el sentido de hazlo mejor, si no sobreponte).


6

Todas las respuestas (y está también) son similares, añado tres: Dos extraídas de wordreference: Acéptalo. Apechuga Para casos como If you don't like it deal with it sería: ajo y agua loc. col. Expr. que se usa para indicar resignación: tengo que estudiar y no puedo salir, así que ajo y agua. Por apócope eufemística de a joderse y ...


6

The word usted is derived from the ancient expression vuestra merced (your mercy), which was used to politely/formally address other people several centuries ago. When you addressed someone as vuestra merced, you were not directly addressing them, but something else ("their mercy"); hence the use of the 3rd person that has been kept to our days. Many other ...


6

Es correcto, las FAQ de la RAE lo mencionan. Véase la parte de Detrás de mí, encima de mí, al lado mío del enlace anterior Copio un fragmento que será útil: Para discernir si es o no correcta una expresión con posesivo, debemos fijarnos en la categoría de la palabra núcleo: si es un sustantivo, será correcta (puede decirse al lado mío, pues lado es un ...


6

Por favor añadir copia de [algun documento específico] (Si hubiera).


5

Se refiere al C. D. Alcoyano, equipo de fútbol de la ciudad española que indicas. Hay dos teorías sobre el origen de la expresión. La primera dice que en un partido de Copa, el árbitro, un minuto antes de tiempo, pitó el final del partido, y los del Alcoyano se lo recriminaron porque creían que era posible remontar pese a que iban perdiendo por goleada: ...


5

it depends also on the context, for example in Spain between friends, or in a relaxed environment, is OK and pretty common, but in a (formal) work environment it can be seen as a sexist comment, pretty much like your boss saying "honey" or "princess" to a girl in a meeting.


5

You could use si los/las hay or si acaso existen. ¿Cuáles son los beneficios, si los hay? ¿Cuáles son los beneficios, si acaso existen? Note that I'm not sure these expression could be used in their respective singular forms (si lo/la hay and si acaso existe).


5

I think you are confused because you are mixing two completely unrelated concepts. The concept of "bad words" or vulgarities is a social concept, which varies greatly from region to region, and can often be influenced by local laws (i.e. certain English words cannot be said on broadcast television or radio in the US). This is true in any language. The ...


5

Por un lado, según la RAE: Curtir Acostumbrar a alguien a la vida dura y a sufrir adversidades que puedan sobrellevarse con el paso del tiempo.     estar curtido en algo: Estar acostumbrado a ello o diestro en hacerlo. Curtido Coloquialmente, experimentado. Por otro lado, la expresión a pie de calle tiene un ...


5

Creo que esa frase no tiene ningún significado entre líneas, aunque obviamente la oración completa es un "sinsentido" en la vida real porque un corazón no puede salirse del pecho, etc., la frase le duele el pecho no me parece que necesite algún tipo de aclaración o traducción especial, si no, simplemente "His chest hurts" porque creo que en inglés y en ...


5

If informal you could go with estar por Estoy por ti / Estoy por él o por ella. You could also use estar loco por (or chiflado) and me gusta the same way you use crazy for or like somebody in English. Other informal forms would be estar colado por alguien Estoy colado por ti. You could also say that somebody te pone if he or she makes you feel ...


4

Según lo indicado en el siguiente punto de la RAE sí es correcto. efecto. 9 . m. pl. Bienes, muebles, enseres. La "pl" de plural es decir como en el caso de "efectos personales". Sin embargo, como nativo nunca he oido que se emplee en otro caso con la misma definición.


4

Más bien coloquial Apáñate o Apáñate con esto


3

"Tú" and "Usted" are the second personal-pronoun. Both of them. We use "Tú" for friends, siblings, people of our age, sometimes younger people than us, or someone that we have confidence with, With "Usted" we refer to older people than you, professors, maybe your parents and older familiars, or someone you don't have that much confidence with. It shows ...


3

Usted is equivalent to you (2nd person) in English but it uses the third person form of the verbs (like he, she, it) in Spanish. presente verbo es: yo soy tú eres él es nosotros somos vosotros sois ellos son Usted must use 'es'.


3

This is one of those expressions that you should not try to translate from a language to another. You are not actually asking about the time, but about the hour. That What time is it? is sort of Which is the hour? when asked in Spanish, so you are identifying one of the 24 moments in which we have divided the day. We are not identifying a property of time, ...


3

Ya que la pregunta no nos da ningún contexto, propongo otra forma de traducir la frase cuando la frase en inglés tiene el sentido de «hay un problema, y quiero que tú seas la persona que lo resuelva». Arréglalo Corrígelo Resuélvelo Al que, si se quiere ser más despectivo, puédese hacer pronomial y reforzar con un pronombre tónico explícito: ¡resuélvetelo ...


3

I agree that it depends a lot on the country and even region. In some places I have seen "cariño" used among close frinds, mostly women. Also I have it seen used to mark distance (a superior woman calling an inferior "cariño" as a sign of superiority like the one has over her children).


3

I don't know the context, but maybe you could use "si procede" or "cuando proceda", which translates into "if applicable"/"if appropriate": Por favor, añade una copia de [los papeles], si procede.


3

En Argentina se dice Bancatelá


2

It depends highly on Country (e.g. in Chile it would be acceptable, in Argentina the word is not very much used in this sense) Socioeconomic level (amongst high-middle class it would be acceptable) Sexism awareness So I'd ask directly if the use would be OK among your group.


2

Se refiere al equipo de fútbol de Alcoy. No sé mucho de fútbol, pero parece que, a pesar de perder constantemente, el equipo siempre aparece en las quinielas, tiene la moral alta y esta dispuesto a jugar otro partido contra un nuevo rival. Espero que ayude.


2

The phrase «dar por supuesto» roughly translates as “to take as granted”. Note that English “take out” or “take away” might have a similar meaning as «dar», and yes «dar por supuesto» and «suponer» have a very similar meaning, with the subtle meaning shift you already guessed. Other similar constructions with «dar»: dar por hecho (assume it is a fact) ...


2

You are using "good" and "bad" in two different ways here. The words you present are offensive to some people, regardless of whether or not the opinion conveyed is positive or negative. The degree to which listeners will be offended depends on the country, the social class, and whole lot of other factors. Learning when to be "socially correct" and when ...


2

I don't believe I've used them, or heard them, before today. I inquired my coworkers on them, and their answers essentially match the connotations other answers have given you, so far. What I would add is that both are phrases you would only use with those close to you, and that the fact that they rely on 'bad words' doesn't change the nature of such words ...


2

Significa: ME GUSTAS Ejemplo: Tal vez te sientas incómodo cuando invites a salir a la persona que te gusta. You might feel awkward asking your crush for a first date. Estoy enamorado de una compañera de escuela. I have a crush on my classmate.


2

In my country (Northern Spanish) we say sometimes Acostúmbrate I like also the slightly negative and very colloquial Te aguantas


1

In Spain, but I don't think in the Americas, another phrase which is used a fair bit, with similar meaning to de puta madre is: es la hostia which the Real Academia Española tranlates as muy grande o extraordinario, or simply hostia on its own which expresses surprise or admiration, see other meanings of hostia. As the original meaning is the wafer used ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible