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6

The -se forms descend from the Latin imperfect subjunctive. It is more common in some countries (like Spain), and has a higher frequency in writing than in speech. The -ra forms descend from the simple (or synthetic) pluperfect indicative such that where as now you might see a sentence like No quería café porque ya había tomado té, in the past, would have ...


0

I don't know what percentage of languages use gender for nouns, but the language I know second-best (after English and before Spanish) uses gender, too (German). I find using gender makes things more complicated, but also more clear/precise. zB, when you say "the teacher" in English, it doesn't tell you whether the teacher is male or female (without adding ...


15

Gender is a grammatical feature that was present in Proto-Indo-European, that is, the common ancestor of a diverse group of languages including both English and Spanish, as well as Greek and Hindi. The development of that is an interesting read. Both Anglo-Saxon and Latin (the languages from which English and Spanish derive) had a three way gender ...


0

Spanish is a Romance language derived from Latin (through Vulgar Latin) which had the gender distinction for all nouns. And thus the gender distinction rule persists in Spanish. I believe it helps in rearranging the order of sentences and constructing complex sentences without confusion. Old English also had genders for inanimate objects but it has ...


0

The word "libertar" is not used. I can only think in the honorific title: "libertador" (the one who gives freedom). In Perú, is only used for Simón Bolívar and José de San Martín (the venezuelan and argentinian generals who fought the wars of independence). It is not used even for the peruvian president which abolished slavery: Ramón Castilla.


0

Libertar es el acto de transformar a alguien en liberto, por lo que un libertador es alguien que liberta gente. Liberar es el acto de dejar libre a alguien, y un liberador es alguien que libera gente. Un liberto es alguien que antes estaba preso y ha sido liberado, por lo que para libertar a alguien hay que liberarlo, y viceversa. Ambas palabras son por ...


2

They aren't actually gender neutral nouns in Spanish except adjectives that have been forced into nouns like lo bueno. Neuter gender would mean they'd use the article lo, or would always use a neuter adjective form (which is -o, it matches the masculine one). Of the Romance languages, only Asturian and Romanian have significant use for the neuter with ...


1

Ambas se pueden usar porque son sinónimos. Diccionario de sinónimos y antónimos © 2005 Espasa-Calpe Aunque liberar tiene un sentido más amplio que libertar. Libertar (de Liberto) en Ingles: 1. E:exempt 2. liberate Liberate: to give liberty to; make free. Liberar (de Liberare) en Ingles: 1. acquit, absolve 2. free 3. liberate, release 4. manumit ...


1

libertar. (De liberto). tr. Poner en libertad o soltar a quien está atado, preso o sujeto físicamente. tr. Librar a alguien de una atadura moral. . liberar. (Del lat. liberāre). tr. Eximir a alguien de una obligación. U. t. c. prnl. tr. Hacer que alguien o algo quede libre. tr. Desprender, producir, secretar. De las ...



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