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4

I think the historical context you're missing is that "caballero" is similar in spirit to the french "chevalier" which implies horse as well (cheval in french) but really means knight. So you can think of caballero as gentleman in a modern context, but historically refers to knights.


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A cowboy is a vaquero, the one that leads the cattle. Caballero has nowadays the meaning of "gentleman", and the word comes from "horse" but actually not the horses used to ride (equus –i), but the ones used for the hard work (caballus –i). Caballero, del latín caballarĭus, es una persona que va a caballo o que cabalga. Dado que, en la antigüedad, la ...


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Actually it does. In the medieval era it was common for nobles (including knights) had access to the best education available, which meant they had better manners than commoners.


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"Who is the third who walks always beside you?" (T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land, line 359). The redoubtable and relentlessly ingenious Luigi Barzini's answer is the most precise, vivid, and memorable: "The very form of address, the third person singular, is also a Spanish left-over. It is a conventional way of talking not to a man but to his aura, so to ...


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Being called a mariachi is like being called a clown for the way they dress mainly, not for the music. In countries like Argentina (I'm from here, don't really know about other countries) mariachi music is considered as a joke and funny. To sum up, "Ser [muy] mariachi" would be a friendly (not offensive) kind of insult (insult is not the word, I don't know ...


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En la mayoría de las palabras procedentes del griego χειρ (mano) el sonido se traduce habitualmente como kir; así es con las palabras quirófano, quiromancia, quiropráctica, quiróptero... En el caso de la palabra cirujano se produce una excepción, probablemente debido a que la palabra fue originalmente introducida en un ambiente popular (a diferencia del ...


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ESPAÑOL (English follows) La palabra persiana, proviene del francés persienne. En el siglo XVIII, en Francia se puso de moda, entre otros muchos artículos orientales, una celosía de tablillas que podían enrollarse para regular la entrada de luz a las viviendas; se situaba entre la ventana y la contraventana o postigo. El artículo era algo nuevo, y ...


3

Hace años también me sorprendí de que "carmelita" fuera una denominación "local". Ya sabía que venía del hábito usado por las hermanas de la orden Carmelitas descalzas. Ahora me encuentro en Haifa, Israel, frente al monte Carmel. En su cima se encuentra la iglesia y el monasterio de Stella Maris, origen de las Carmelitas ("La Orden de los Hermanos de ...


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As native Spanish speakers we often consider Judía (member of the Jewish religious community) and Judía (bean, not only green beans) as simply homonymous words. However, Google has taken me to this interesting article that seems to believe that there is indeed a connection between the two. First, it disputes a previously assumed ethimologic origin: La ...


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Indeed, it is probable that derived from Jewish. Are other plants whose name derives from its geographical origin or some people who supposedly eats, as mandarina (Citrus reticulata) ["an official of the imperial China"]. In Chile we eat a type of lettuce which we call española ("Spanish"). There are probably other examples of similar words in other ...


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Green beans weren't brought to Europe until after the discovery of the Americas, so it's doubtful it was named that because of the Jews. The DRAE gives the etymology as "perhaps" from judío, but doesn't claim to be definitive. As pure speculation, recall some of the phonetic changes that occurred in various words Spanish: x (pronounced line English sh) went ...


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Similar to another post but... If we bring Portuguese into the mix it might shed some light into this whole question. "Thank you!" = "Obrigado(a)!" > which literally means I am obliged or I now am obligated to repay your favor. "You are welcome!" = "De nada" > I'm basically saying to that person who thanked me that it didn't cost me anything (effort or ...



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