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45

Both signs encapsulate statements that make an exclamation or a question or both. In the usage of both it is very important to have the following considerations: They have to be used at the beginning and the end of the statement. It is mandatory in spanish to use them. It will not be ignored as in the spelling of other languages that use only the ending ...


30

It’s a basic rule of Spanish phonotactics. In a nutshell, the structure of a Spanish syllable does not allow it: (C1 (C2)) (S1) V (S2) (C3 (C4)) A Spanish syllable consists of an optional onset, consisting of one or two consonants; a required nucleus, consisting of a vowel optionally preceded by and/or followed by a semivowel; and an optional coda, ...


29

Unfortunately I can't give you a definite answer yet. But I thought that not posting these two theories would've been a waste, so here they are: This point is in my opinion the most accredited: In this question, In Spanish, why do they say "buenos noches"?, the answerer says it comes from "Buenas noches nos dé Dios", which means "may God give us good ...


24

"De nada" means (literally) that there's nothing to be thankful about. "No hay nada que agradecer". It's semantically similar to "not at all", but it can also be correctly translated to "You're welcome".


20

I think most of the meanings you outline are variations on two basic meanings, namely "bomb" and "pump". For example, "gas station" and "fire station" seem to be obvious extensions of the word "pump", since both stations are based on a pump. The use of "bomba" meaning a piece of news is, IMO, figurative. In English we sometimes refer to a sensational news ...


19

Español De hecho, puedes encontrar rastros de ese tipo de coincidencias también en inglés. Un savant es una persona que sabe mucho. A pesar de que es un préstamo del francés, se usa bastante en inglés. Un sage es también una persona sabia, alguien que sabe mucho. Un plato savoury es un plato salado o condimentado, lo cual se refiere al sabor. Los dos ...


17

Gender is a grammatical feature that was present in Proto-Indo-European, that is, the common ancestor of a diverse group of languages including both English and Spanish, as well as Greek and Hindi. The development of that is an interesting read. Both Anglo-Saxon and Latin (the languages from which English and Spanish derive) had a three way gender ...


16

Because Spanish is a language that evolved independently from English, which means translations do not have to follow the same rules. Buenos días is what you say between dawn and noon. The day is just starting, so it makes sense to wish the other person a good day, not just a good morning.


15

In fact both English sport and Spanish deporte come from Latin deportāre / deportō. The Spanish etymology at least as far as the spelling is concerned is quite straightforward. There never was an s. It's the English etymology that picked up the s and lost the de. The reason is because English picked up the word from Anglo-Norman, the version of French ...


14

No, aburrir comes from the Latin abhorrere, related with the English word abhor. Burro or borrico comes also from the Latin, but from a different root, burricus (caballejo).


14

There is a large group of words that Spanish inherits from Greek which end in "ma" and, following their Greek roots, are masculine. They may even be the majority of words that end in "a" but are masculine. el clima el programa el sistema el lema el tema el problema el idioma el drama Mostly they're the sorts of words that English might take from Greek. ...


14

Usted comes from Vuestra Merced (later Vuesarced), meaning "Your Grace". Since this was an indirect way of addressing someone, it was inflected in the third person. That is, strictly speaking, you are not addressing the person, but "Their Grace". As time went on, the person inflection was kept, even though its origins became opaque. In a study entitled El ...


14

From the top of my head, the most used one would be izquierda: left There are others, like: zamarra or chamarra: though RAE says zamarra is a sheepskin jacket or similar, in the Basque Country we use it, in Spanish too, to mean overcoat or any coat, really (usually pronounced "chamarra"). zulo: in Basque it literally means "hole", but thanks ...


13

A una persona con pocos conocimientos se le dice coloquialmente "burro". Un "mataburros" es literalmente algo que elimina a los burros y de ahí que (en Argentina, por ejemplo) al diccionario se le diga "mataburros" pues ayuda a suprimir burros, es decir, personas sin conocimientos. Un caso similar sucede con "tumbaburros" que es otra de las maneras ...


13

There are some clues that help spot words that may be of Arabic origin and there are some lists on the Internet but there's no guaranteed method other than looking up the etymology of each word to know for sure. The biggest clue is words beginning with al- (or ál-), which in Arabic is the definite article "the" / "el" / "la", but generally gets fused into ...


13

Gender While the rule is in general that all -o words are masculine, there are exceptions. This one is one of these exceptions to that rule. Origin One theory (proposed here) is that this word derived from the Latin word manus which was a fourth-declension feminine noun. For comparison, first declension nouns were all feminine and second declension were ...


12

English "Sin embargo" is an adversative idiom meaning nevertheless or without setting any impediment. From DRAE: sin embargo. 1. locución conjuntiva adversativa. No obstante, sin que sirva de impedimento. As it is idiom, it doesn't make much sense to make comparisons with it's English counterpart. But let's see how it comes to mean this in ...


10

Español Lo he oído explicado así: El pretérito de "ser" viene de la versión del latín de esse, que usa la raíz 'fui'. La historia va de que "ir" es irregular en el sentido de que estaba compuesto de múltiples verbos, y por tanto toma su pretérito del latín "esse". El presente, pretérito, subjuntivo del latín vadere. El infinitivo del latín ire. El ...


10

According to the Wikipedia page for the Spanish language, under "Writing system", they are all loanwords (directly integrated or words "adapted" to the Spanish writing system): The letters "k" and "w" are used only in words and names coming from foreign languages (kilo, folklore, whiskey, William, etc. The single origin for each word is obviously ...


10

Vuestra merced evolved to usted. Vuestra merced is a really antique way to say something like your highness (not literally though).


10

According to RAE "it's a polite answer to thanks being given to somebody", basically it's kind of equivalent to it was nothing/think nothing of it/no problem/don't mention it, in spanish you can also say no fue nada (and in that sense that sounds more "complete"), por nada, no hay problema, so basically de nada and the other variants are the current short ...


10

A good answer here in Spanish. Basically, in latin it was said mecum = me + cum (mí + con). The cum was being lost to a go (migo). To reinforce the lost con it was added at the beginning: con+_migo_ = conmigo


10

Viene del latín antrus, y este del griego ἄντρον caverna. Lo de usarse para indicar un sitio de vida nocturna es un mejicanismo por extensión del significado 2. m. Local, establecimiento, vivienda, etc., de mal aspecto o reputación.


10

Santiago, (also San Iago, San Tiago, Santyago, Sant-Yago, San Thiago) is a Spanish name that derives from the Hebrew name Jacob (Ya'akov) via "Sant Iago," "Sant Yago," "Santo Iago," or "Santo Yago," first used to denote Saint James the Great, the brother of John the Apostle. It was also the tradition that Saint James (Santiago) had traveled to the Iberian ...


10

Lovely question! The conjugation of a verb in Spanish has more info about the person: in German sie, Sie und wir are conjugated the same way, and here is the key: they always coincide. Also in the singular, the verb for some personal pronouns very often coincide (ich muss, er muss). So you do need a personal pronoun in German. And well, in English, as you ...


9

From this page (emphasis mine): Las contracciones al y del aparecen en la lengua escrita siglos antes de que existiera la Real Academia, como lo atestiguan numerosos documentos de entre los siglos X y XVIII. (...) Los académicos no hicieron sino recoger este uso, de manera que en la primera edición del Diccionario de Autoridades, en ...


9

As a mexican, I can tell you that even though Chewie is 100% right in all of his affirmations about the word "chingar" and its derivatives, your friend told you the correct thing as well. Let me explain. The form "chinga" can have different meanings depending on the context: As the conjugation of the singular third person of "chingar". In this context it ...


9

In English The -se forms descend from the Latin imperfect subjunctive. It is more common in some countries (like Spain), and has a higher frequency in writing than in speech. The -ra forms descend from the simple (or synthetic) pluperfect indicative such that where as now you might see a sentence like No quería café porque ya había tomado té, in the past, ...


9

Como tu lo mencionas, subire esta compuesto por sub (bajo/abajo) + ire (ir/avanzar) y si es la etimología correcta, sin embargo lo estas viendo con el enfoque opuesto, es decir, subire no significa ir/avanzar hacia abajo sino lo contrario ir/avanzar DESDE abajo (↑)


8

The premise that the Spanish equivalent of "encounter" is "rencontrar" is false. "Rencontrar" means "to re-encounter", or to encounter again, for a second time for example. Hence the "r".



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