New answers tagged

1

How many more apples does John have than Phil? In Spanish: ¿Cuántas manzanas de más tiene John que Phil? Source: myself, Spanish is my native language.


3

Estas formas son equivalentes: ¿A cuántos estudiantes más les gusta más el ciclismo que nadar? ¿A cuántos estudiantes más les gusta el ciclismo más que nadar? y ¿A cuántos estudiantes más les gustan más las manzanas que las naranjas? ¿A cuántos estudiantes más les gustan las manzanas más que las naranjas? The second form sounds ...


2

English: How many more students like biking than swimming? Spanish: ¿A cuántos estudiantes les gusta más el ciclismo que nadar? English: How many more students like apples than oranges? Spanish: ¿A cuántos estudiantes les gusta más las manzanas que las naranjas? Also you can use something like: ¿A cuántos estudiantes les gusta el ciclismo antes que ...


1

In light of the English grammar involved, to make it similar of what a Spanish speaker would say, I'd phrase it as: ¿Cuántas manzanas más tiene Alí que Phil? So it's perfectly idiomatic. Swapping we get another sentence given by fedorqui: ¿Cuántas más manzanas tiene Alí que Phil? I remember saying this wording once, but now it doesn't click on ...


8

Firstly, "cuánto/cuánta/cuántos/cuántas" is an adjetivo interrogativo which, as all adjectives, must agree with the noun it qualifies — "manzanas", in this case. Secondly, the adverb "más", if paired with some kind of quantifier, is generally placed after the noun: ¿Cuántas manzanas más necesitas? Necesito tres manzanas más. Then I wouldn't separate ...


4

Your attempt is correct. You just missed the fact that "manzanas" is feminine, so "cuántos" has to match the gender and be "cuántas": ¿Cuántas más manzanas tiene Ali que Phil? However, to me it sounds a bit better to swap both terms and say: ¿Cuántas manzanas más tiene Ali que Phil?


3

Marque la sílaba tónica means you need to mark where the word is correctly stressed. Namely, ánimo, animo, animó are all different and the sílaba tónica is bolded to show the correct stress. Regarding your other question, briefly: ah shows realisation about something: ah, now I get it. (It's the same in English.) ha is the auxiliary verb for the third ...



Top 50 recent answers are included