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1

I'm from Mexico, I know clay can mean 'arcilla' so I guess it's because people speak different in different parts of the country, that might explain why they don't know (or don't find it common) the word 'arcilla'.


1

Lo que hace dificil explicar regionalismos de la lengua Española es la expansion territorial del lenguaje a través del mundo. Mi experiencia viajando a varios países alrededor del mundo y haber interactuado con personas de mucho países de habla hispana, lo mejor es tratar the aprender las palabras de uso común de la lengua Española. En este caso, la palabra ...


0

En Chile no hay una palabra para el coqueteo recíproco. Los mayores de 40 todavía decimos "pinchar", "ellos están pinchando", pero el uso está desprestigiado por anticuado. Cuando una persona le coquetea a otra, la está "joteando" (los jotes son los buitres).


0

In Colombia we use vosotros but only when learning Spanish grammar in elementary, however we don't use it outside the notebook.


2

Since you don't say anything about the context I'll give some options. You could use Me gustaría invitarte a cenar. Te invito a cenar la próxima semana. You could be seeing this in an informal email, for example. If you want to go more informal (within the context of asking someone out on a date): Te gustaría cenar conmigo la próxima semana? ...


1

Barro really means mud. Arcilla is a more precise translation of clay. A lot of people don't carefully distinguish between clay and mud, in either language. This is especially true in casual conversation.


1

I'm from Spain, and it's like Mauricio and Diego says. Arcilla is for the material for sculpture while barro it's more used for the dirt in the ground where children play with water, like Diego say: "mud". But in Spain we don't said barro for pimples. Pimples in spanish is "granos".


1

I can tell you that clay is called arcilla in Argentina. :)


2

I suggest difference the use of both words in context, is better the use of word Arcilla for refer the material used for jar or sculpture (as @Diego says), instead Barro that it could be assumed for some meanings: El niño se resbaló en el barro. No te toques ese barro! (reference to acne "pimples").


2

I can't tell you is arcilla is used in every single Spanish-speaking country or not. That might require compiling a list from various contributors (like this answer). I can tell you that is use is neither archaic nor poetic. In Spain is as used as barro. The difference might be that barro is mud too, while with arcilla you always convey that is a material ...



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