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11

Según la RAE en el caso de mano se aceptan ambas aunque la norma gramatical es no cambiar la vocal final en el diminutivo independientemente del género, en el DPD: mano. 1. ‘Parte del cuerpo que comprende desde la muñeca hasta la punta de los dedos’. Es femenino: la mano. Para el diminutivo son válidas las formas manito y manita. Lo habitual en la formación ...


9

Contrary to what fedorqui states in his answer, you can rarely talk in binary terms (correct/incorrect) when addressing language use or, specially, dictionaries. Dictionaries' task is to exclusively establish which uses are the most common in any given language and describing them, not prescribing them. Anyhow, the use of the diminutive suffix -illo (as in ...


8

If the name ends in a vowel but no "I": eliminate the vowel and add "ito/illo/ín/iño" (male) or "ita/illa/ina/iña" (female). Eduardo - Eduardito/Eduardillo/Eduardín/Eduardiño Manolo - Manolito/Manolillo/Manolín/Manoliño Mirta - Mirtita/Mirtilla/Mirtina/Mirtiña Marco - Marquito/Marquillo/Marquín/Marquiño Carlo - Carlito/Carlillo/Carlín/Carliño Carla - ...


7

It is indeed quite complicated to distinguish whether Julieta Venegas says suavecito or suavecillo. I listened to the verse few times and I still cannot tell. However, the diminutive for suave cannot be suavecillo. Instead, use suavecito. You cannot find this in the normal dictionary, since diminutives and superlatives normally are not listed there (its ...


6

Why we say amorcito instead of amorito when we say for example "casita" as diminutive for casa? La formación de diminutivos con el sufijo -ita se hace añadiendo dicha terminación a la base de la palabra, como en el caso de casa, cuya base es cas- y se forma casita. El sufijo -cita (así como -ecita) es una variación de -ita, cuyo uso se debe más a la ...


6

Yes, you would be understood. However, in most places it would be regarded as baby-speak or informal. Also, you need to bear in mind that the choice of suffix to construct a diminutive varies from region to region. In Leon, north-west Spain, the suffices "-in" (dinerín) and "-ina" (galletina) are preferred, and often it's not even regarded as baby-speak. ...


6

The proper way to say it is the following: Veracidad As kevin said his examples are very good. But I am afraid that verdaderosidad does not exist or certizidad or veracecinidad. The proper word is veracidad even if no so fancy as the invented versions. As gonzalo said per comments, certeza is a good alternative. The problem is that in Spanish we don'...


5

Colbert Report fan, eh? This is a tough one. I looked to color words, many of which have an -ish equivalent, which is what we're looking for here. We have: rojizo - reddish blanquizo/blanquecino/blancuzco - whitish azulado - bluish verdoso - greenish negruzco - blackish amarillente/amarilloso - yellowish I don't know the technical name of the ...


5

In Mexico is well addressed as panecito, and I think anyone would understand it, however is not a real word as far as I know, at least couldn't find it on the dictionary, I found this however: "Los monosílabos o no perminten derivaciones o lo hacen con -ec-, pasando a ser la palabra un cuatrisílabo" pan- panecito Tren - Trenecito Pez - Pececito sol-...


5

"Pan" is a generic term, it means bread in general, not an actual piece of bread. In this sense you would not use it in diminutive form, would you? That said, we do use "panecillo", at least in Spain, for a small, one-helping piece of bread. That is the only word, among your suggestions, which is present in the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española. "...


5

Es que no hay una sola forma diminutiva, ni tampoco hay reglas precisamente estrictas para su formación. Según la Nueva Gramática: 1.6b Las restricciones léxicas relativas a la posibilidad de formar diminutivos con sustantivos son escasas, sobre todo si el diminutivo designa un objeto material. Los diccionarios no recogen estas voces, ya que se pueden ...


4

English The -ito ending, like most diminuitives, is productive. As syrux points out, other ones like -uco, -eto, -ico, -illo, -ino, and -ín are used more commonly in certain areas and tend to be equally as productive (to his list can also be added -iño from Galicia and -ingo from the Andes). When we say a suffix is productive, that means that, ...


3

The confusion arises because we never hear the end of the word, as it overlaps with the next line, that starts with: Y yo... So we hear something like: suaveci-- Y yo In many Spanish speaking regions including Mexico, Y yo sounds exactly as -illo. That's why one could hear this as suavecillo. See this question and this Wikipedia article In the ...


2

It is very common to use the term panito in Guatemala actually.


2

Here in Perú I was taught and learned it this way: I memorized the key: "REN(cito)" -- Meaning when a word ends in "R", "E" or "N" append "-cito" (masculine) or "-cita" (feminine). Otherwise, words ending in "O" or "A" likely get "-ito" (masculine), "-ita" (feminine), or seemingly less common "-illo" (masculine) and "-illa" (feminine). Therefore, and ...


2

To expound a bit on the other answers, and address one specific part of the question: Or is it a regional dialect/slang? The grammatical use of -ita / -ito is universal, however the idiomatic use of certain words is anything but! As an example mentioned in your question, "ahorita" is the normal way, in Mexico, to say "Right now" or "In just a moment" (...


1

Suavecillo is more vernacular, but almost not used in Mexico. Julieta would certainly say "suavecito". Suavecillo would be more Venezuelan.


1

The songs says: Suavecito. "Suavecillo" its a regular expression used on the north of the country (México). The finish on words "illo" its so normal. "Plebillo" (Plebito), "Perrillo" (Perrito), etc.


1

No En Español los sufijos diminutivos marcan generalmente tamaño pequeño, juventud, cariño o desdén pero no hay un estudio definitivo y las pautas se obedecen en gran medida a los usos locales o particulares del hablante. Sobre el uso de ahorita: uno de los casos más comunes es "ahorita"; que usado especialmente en Méjico para indicar urgencia, es usado ...


1

Panecillo (a small bread baked in that form, not a slice) is itself a word. You could say "panecillito" for a small "panecillo". So, for "pan" (any kind of "bread") I would say "pancito" or "panecito". "Pansito" and "panesito" are wrong.



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