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11

Según la RAE en el caso de mano se aceptan ambas aunque la norma gramatical es no cambiar la vocal final en el diminutivo independientemente del género, en el DPD: mano. 1. ‘Parte del cuerpo que comprende desde la muñeca hasta la punta de los dedos’. Es femenino: la mano. Para el diminutivo son válidas las formas manito y manita. Lo habitual en la formación ...


8

If the name ends in a vowel but no "I": eliminate the vowel and add "ito/illo/ín/iño" (male) or "ita/illa/ina/iña" (female). Eduardo - Eduardito/Eduardillo/Eduardín/Eduardiño Manolo - Manolito/Manolillo/Manolín/Manoliño Mirta - Mirtita/Mirtilla/Mirtina/Mirtiña Marco - Marquito/Marquillo/Marquín/Marquiño Carlo - Carlito/Carlillo/Carlín/Carliño ...


6

Yes, you would be understood. However, in most places it would be regarded as baby-speak or informal. Also, you need to bear in mind that the choice of suffix to construct a diminutive varies from region to region. In Leon, north-west Spain, the suffices "-in" (dinerín) and "-ina" (galletina) are preferred, and often it's not even regarded as baby-speak. ...


6

The proper way to say it is the following: Veracidad As kevin said his examples are very good. But I am afraid that verdaderosidad does not exist or certizidad or veracecinidad. The proper word is veracidad even if no so fancy as the invented versions. As gonzalo said per comments, certeza is a good alternative. The problem is that in Spanish we ...


5

In Mexico is well addressed as panecito, and I think anyone would understand it, however is not a real word as far as I know, at least couldn't find it on the dictionary, I found this however: "Los monosílabos o no perminten derivaciones o lo hacen con -ec-, pasando a ser la palabra un cuatrisílabo" pan- panecito Tren - Trenecito Pez - Pececito ...


5

"Pan" is a generic term, it means bread in general, not an actual piece of bread. In this sense you would not use it in diminutive form, would you? That said, we do use "panecillo", at least in Spain, for a small, one-helping piece of bread. That is the only word, among your suggestions, which is present in the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española. ...


4

English The -ito ending, like most diminuitives, is productive. As syrux points out, there are other ones that are used more commonly in other areas and tend to be equally as productive (to his list can also be added -iño from Galicia and -ingo from the Andes). When we say a suffix is productive, that means that, theoretically, it can be added to any word ...


4

Colbert Report fan, eh? This is a tough one. I looked to color words, many of which have an -ish equivalent, which is what we're looking for here. We have: rojizo - reddish blanquizo/blanquecino/blancuzco - whitish azulado - bluish verdoso - greenish negruzco - blackish amarillente/amarilloso - yellowish I don't know the technical name of the ...


2

It is very common to use the term panito in Guatemala actually.


2

To expound a bit on the other answers, and address one specific part of the question: Or is it a regional dialect/slang? The grammatical use of -ita / -ito is universal, however the idiomatic use of certain words is anything but! As an example mentioned in your question, "ahorita" is the normal way, in Mexico, to say "Right now" or "In just a moment" ...


1

Panecillo (a small bread baked in that form, not a slice) is itself a word. You could say "panecillito" for a small "panecillo". So, for "pan" (any kind of "bread") I would say "pancito" or "panecito". "Pansito" and "panesito" are wrong.


1

Here in Perú I was taught and learned it this way: I memorized the key: "REN(cito)" -- Meaning when a word ends in "R", "E" or "N" append "-cito" (masculine) or "-cita" (feminine). Otherwise, words ending in "O" or "A" likely get "-ito" (masculine), "-ita" (feminine), or seemingly less common "-illo" (masculine) and "-illa" (feminine). Therefore, and ...



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