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1

In Mexico it applies the same as in other countries. "Sobaco" is vulgar and if you do use it, its when someone has bad odor in their armpits (te huele el sobaco, hueles a sobaco). Axila is when you are actually referring to the armpit as a body part.


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As others have said, this is not a commonly spoken word, but is found mostly in poetry and writing, perhaps especially used in folk and children tales. I would use "acá y acullá" as the equivalent of "hither and yon". As an aside, The RAE defines "acullá" as adv. l. A la parte opuesta de quien habla. U. en contraposición a adverbios demostrativos de ...


2

I researched the origin of the word "gringo" when I was in graduate school after one of my professors offered the silly "green-go" myth as the explanation. The term has clearly been in use for centuries to describe non-Spanish people. The most widely accepted theory among etymologists was that the word was derived from "griego," the Spanish word for Greek. ...


1

I noticed my mothers family in El Salvador uses Vos excessively. My Salvadoran family here in the States uses vos and tu equally. I think tu might be a bit more formal. Whenever they're joking about they tend to use vos more. My Mexican family doesn't use vos at all. I once traveled from El Salvador to Mexico (I picked up the Salvadoran accent and dialect) ...


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Toda palabra derivada de "chingar" es inherentemente altisonante y por lo tanto no debe usarse en situaciones donde hay que expresarse de forma cortés y propia.


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"Chale" en inglés puede más o menos traducirse como "gosh!", es una interjección que se exclama para expresar molestia por una situación. Por ejemplo: Chale, este camión ya no pasó. Gosh, the bus didn't arrive at all. Chale, otra vez me toca lavar todo. Gosh, once again I'm the one who washes everything. Como lo han dicho antes, es una ...


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I'm a Mexican telecommunications engineer, and here's how it went for me: Do courses in Spanish speaking countries expect some knowledge of English as a prerequisite? Usually not, but it's a very good idea to start with some cursory knowledge of English. Do they teach you what English keywords mean? They usually do, but it depends entirely on how ...


0

First, you can write it as hueón, huevón, güeón, güevón or weón, it doesn't matter (but we mostly use "wn" or "weón"). This is used in Chile and was propagated among other countries in South America due to the internet and social networks. Meanings: Weón 1) dude, bro, man 2) a person, a man, an unknown 3) jerk, asshole, stupid Weá 1) a thing in general ...



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