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-2

En México usamos " JALAR " siempre con jota y se pronuncia igual con jota como jamón. La hache H siempre es mucha solo en combinación con la C como el nombre de la letra. Me molesta mucho escuchar en la televisión programas doblados del inglés, donde dicen (h)alen o (h)ala esa cuerda. En vez de decir jalen o jala esa cuerda. La Real Academia de Lengua ...


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In Guatemala pinche is used to denote a perceived lack of value about something. It is part of the informal vocabulary and is not considered an insult although still derogatory in nature. Safe translations in Guatemala would be: miserable, trivial, wretched, insignificant, etc.


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In Nicaragua it is used as a term to describe people as "cheap" or "stingy": "Eres pinche" means "You're cheap/stingy"


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In Chile if you say "pinche" it most likely means hair clip. It's a goddamn hair clip. Example: Pasame el pinche - Pass me the hair clip. That's what it means to me. (If I made any mistake,my bad, I don't speak spanish at all but my parents speak spanish everyday so I understand spanish well)


2

La variedad de español hablada en México tiene muchas particularidades que la hacen facil de reconocer, y este es un buen ejemplo. La forma original y la más extendida es llevar, y es muy probable que quien no sepa que aprendiste en México lo tome por un error. Esto es porque en español, tener tiempo generalmente apunta hacia el futuro, así si le preguntas ...


2

To expound a bit on the other answers, and address one specific part of the question: Or is it a regional dialect/slang? The grammatical use of -ita / -ito is universal, however the idiomatic use of certain words is anything but! As an example mentioned in your question, "ahorita" is the normal way, in Mexico, to say "Right now" or "In just a moment" ...


4

English The -ito ending, like most diminuitives, is productive. As syrux points out, there are other ones that are used more commonly in other areas and tend to be equally as productive (to his list can also be added -iño from Galicia and -ingo from the Andes). When we say a suffix is productive, that means that, theoretically, it can be added to any word ...


1

No En Español los sufijos diminutivos marcan generalmente tamaño pequeño, juventud, cariño o desdén pero no hay un estudio definitivo y las pautas se obedecen en gran medida a los usos locales o particulares del hablante. Sobre el uso de ahorita: uno de los casos más comunes es "ahorita"; que usado especialmente en Méjico para indicar urgencia, es usado ...


-1

is this one of those blanket endings that can be applied to pretty much any noun with the effect of describing it as smaller? It is usable on all nouns as far as I know, Spanish is pretty straightforward and consistent, apart from any Arabic influences. I can't think of any nouns you couldn't use it on. There is also -illo/illa. There are pretty ...


2

En México es común decir "Tengo mucho tiempo" que significaría lo mismo que la otra, en el sentido de que "'He acumulado' mucho tiempo sin ir al cine" (Entonces o llevo (contando) o tengo (acumulado) mucho tiempo sin ir al cine). Pero sí, lo importante es descartar lo que pueda traer ambigüedades


2

Buenas, soy de Argentina y dejame responderte amigo: "Tengo mucho tiempo sin ir al cine" no es del todo correcto, decir "tengo mucho tiempo" significa que dispones tiempo para hacer algo. Lo correcto sería decir "llevo mucho tiempo sin ir al cine" o "hace mucho tiempo que no voy al cine" de esa forma es clara la idea de que no has ido al cine hace mucho ...


-1

I think that Vamonos is intransitive. In other words. Let's go, without specifying where. Vamos is transitive and is followed by a location. Not so much "let's go" as much as "we go" .....to the movies. Vamos al cine. Si ¡vamonos!


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The -se forms descend from the Latin imperfect subjunctive. It is more common in some countries (like Spain), and has a higher frequency in writing than in speech. The -ra forms descend from the simple (or synthetic) pluperfect indicative such that where as now you might see a sentence like No quería café porque ya había tomado té, in the past, would have ...


0

In Spain, but I don't think in the Americas, another phrase which is used a fair bit, with similar meaning to de puta madre is: es la hostia which the Real Academia Española tranlates as muy grande o extraordinario, or simply hostia on its own which expresses surprise or admiration, see other meanings of hostia. As the original meaning is the wafer used ...


1

Just to add more info to your question. You can find that, in different places, and depending on the situation and to who are you talking, bad expressions could be pretty well received. For example, on the north of Spain it's not uncommon to hear friends referring themselves with expressions like: "Ven aquí, cabronazo" -- Come here, bastard or "Serás ...


2

Argentina: Educación preescolar (up to 5 years - guardería + "jardín de infantes" = kinderganten). They can be called "alumnos", but often simply are referred as "niños / niñas". Educación primaria (6-11 years): "alumnos" Educación secundaria (12-17 y) : "estudiantes" o "alumnos" Educación terciaria/univesitaria: "estudiantes" o "alumnos" Regarding ...


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For Spain: [Educación] Infantil (3 years, not mandatory), [E.] Preescolar (preschool, 4-5y, not mandatory): They may be referred as alumnos, almost never as estudiantes. You can use de Infantil or de Preescolar as specifiers. [E.] Primaria (6-11y): They are referred usually as alumnos, but also estudiantes. Again with a specifier de Primaria. [E.] ...


2

Estudiante and alumno are both quite general and can refer to anyone from pre-K to doctoral candidates. In Spain, you'll have the following (all said as alumno/a — preferred term — or estudiante followed by the indicated terms,) de infantil - pre-K to Kindergarten more specifically, de X años where X is the age. de primaria - primary school ...


2

I don't believe I've used them, or heard them, before today. I inquired my coworkers on them, and their answers essentially match the connotations other answers have given you, so far. What I would add is that both are phrases you would only use with those close to you, and that the fact that they rely on 'bad words' doesn't change the nature of such words ...


1

You have come across two different examples here. "Mucha mierda" is slang for Theatre people. There is superstition among them that it is actually bad luck to wish "Good luck" to someone, which would be "Mucha suerte" in spanish. So, to avoid saying "Mucha suerte" they have come to "Mucha mierda" as a substitute, as it is, on first sight, exactly the ...


5

I think you are confused because you are mixing two completely unrelated concepts. The concept of "bad words" or vulgarities is a social concept, which varies greatly from region to region, and can often be influenced by local laws (i.e. certain English words cannot be said on broadcast television or radio in the US). This is true in any language. The ...


1

You are using "good" and "bad" in two different ways here. The words you present are offensive to some people, regardless of whether or not the opinion conveyed is positive or negative. The degree to which listeners will be offended depends on the country, the social class, and whole lot of other factors. Learning when to be "socially correct" and when ...


0

The word "libertar" is not used. I can only think in the honorific title: "libertador" (the one who gives freedom). In Perú, is only used for Simón Bolívar and José de San Martín (the venezuelan and argentinian generals who fought the wars of independence). It is not used even for the peruvian president which abolished slavery: Ramón Castilla.


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Libertar es el acto de transformar a alguien en liberto, por lo que un libertador es alguien que liberta gente. Liberar es el acto de dejar libre a alguien, y un liberador es alguien que libera gente. Un liberto es alguien que antes estaba preso y ha sido liberado, por lo que para libertar a alguien hay que liberarlo, y viceversa. Ambas palabras son por ...



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