Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

In Ancient Castillian, words like "caja", "bajo", and "jaraba" were originally spelled with an "x", and pronounced as "sh" (voiceless palato-alveolar sibilant). In the mid- to late-1700s the spellings were changed from an "x" to a "j", including words like "Mejico" and "Tejas". During that time, the "j" was actually pronounced as a "j" in English. Over ...


20

In situations where aquí and acá are both acceptable, aquí would connote more precision. It's worth considering all four words together: Aquí: here Acá: over here Allí: there Allá: over there In cases where the location is very specific, you must use aquí (or allí): Bajo la ley federal, el edificio debe permanecer aquí. (not acá) Bajo la ley ...


17

Before I answer I just want to say that this is by no means an "official" grammatical use of the two words, it it simply the way typical people would typically use it, and at least this is the typical way where I come from, which is Mexico City. Usually "vámonos" would be used in a context in which you are leaving FROM a place, something like "Vámonos de ...


16

See the Wikipedia article on yeísmo, which includes maps of the pronunciations. To summarize: in some regions, ll /ʎ/ and y /ʝ/ are distinct in other regions, ll and y have merged to /ʝ/ ("yeísmo") in very few areas, ll and y have merged to /ʎ/ ("lleísmo") Note that some specific dialects, like Rioplatense, pronounce their merged /ʝ/ as [ʒ] or [ʃ].


16

Según el Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas billón. Voz procedente del francés billion, ‘un millón de millones (10^12)’. Es inaceptable su empleo en español con el sentido de ‘mil millones’, que es el que tiene la palabra billion en el inglés americano. Para este último sentido, debe emplearse la voz millardo (→ millardo), procedente también del francés, ...


14

According to Wikipedia's article on voseo, the geographical distribution can be split into three categories: Countries where voseo is predominant: Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica Countries where both forms are used: Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Venezuela Countries where vos is ...


14

There are a couple of really good answers above but still... Do you understand the British English? I guess you do. For us, is the same. I'm argentinian and I can talk fluenty with almost anyone who speaks any "version" of Spanish. Yes, there a lot of words which have no meaning or a totally different meaning in different countries, but we do detect when ...


13

A una persona con pocos conocimientos se le dice coloquialmente "burro". Un "mataburros" es literalmente algo que elimina a los burros y de ahí que (en Argentina, por ejemplo) al diccionario se le diga "mataburros" pues ayuda a suprimir burros, es decir, personas sin conocimientos. Un caso similar sucede con "tumbaburros" que es otra de las maneras ...


13

The proper Spanish term for a jar would be a frasco, like in: Voy a comprar un frasco de café. Depending on the region, bote de café could be acceptable. RAE reference to 'frasco'


13

Talking about people, apañado (colloquially "apañao") means mañoso: Es un tío muy apañado. Se las arregla muy bien solo. Talking about things, apañado means adecuado: Tiene una casa muy apañada. No es grande, pero es muy cómoda. apañado, da. adj. Hábil, mañoso para hacer algo. adj. coloq. Adecuado, a propósito para el uso a que se destina. ...


13

Kitchen boy. The guys who clean up the Chef's mess and scrub the frying pans and carry stuff around. In this context it's still used in Spain. In Mexico, it's an all-purpose insult enhancer, which would be roughly equivalent to the use of fucking in English. If Jay (Silent Bob's hetero life mate) spoke Spanish, he would say pinche A LOT. Pinche is ...


12

Computadores o computadoras (used in most Spanish speaking countries) and ordenadores (used in Spain) are exactly the same. The singular is computador or computadora (and ordenador). The words they come from (computer in English and ordinateur in French ) also mean the same. I have never seen the feminine "ordenadora". The sign you saw is a mystery to ...


12

In Colombia both forms are used about equally. I prefer axila since is a more technical term and sobaco is perhaps used more often when referring to animals. There's a Colombian saying that goes like this: Estoy más pelado que sobaco de rana (I don't have a dime on me.) Again, sobaco is more colloquial and axila is more formal/technical and they refer ...


11

An example I recently found in Vía Rápida: Cuaderno de ejercicios. In this book, there is a story of a Spanish girl who came to Mexico. Someone told her: Tome asiento. En un ratito viene el profesor. The girl prepared to wait for quite a long time, but then she understood that 'rato' was a different thing in Mexico. The comment from the book: En ...


11

En el diccionario de la Real Academia de la Lengua Española, señala a Antier como la forma coloquial de anteayer, es decir es exactamente lo mismo, pero en un contexto muchísimo más informal, no conocía este adverbio, muchas gracias. Te dejo aquí la URL http://lema.rae.es/drae/?val=antier Edito Es decir, sí estás en lo cierto es jerga, pero del Español ...


10

When they have an imperative meaning like "let's go" both verbs can be interchangeable and can have the same meaning (see Sergio Romero's answer to see the difference). The question you may ask is why there are 2 ways of saying that and it's because the verb "ir" is used many times in a pronominal way as "irse" with the same meaning. So we have: Vamos ...


10

From the top of my head, I use here in Spain, quite interchangeably: tazón cuenco bol ponchera UPDATE As per the comments, I've added ponchera to the list. Now, thinking a bit about this, I would say I use bol: as a generic semispheric vessel (any size). ponchera: as a large bowl (a punch-bowl) cuenco: also generic, but smaller ones "tazón" for ...


10

Es un vulgarismo que debe ser evitado: por analogía con el resto de los tiempos verbales (dices, decías, dirás...), a la segunda persona (tú) se le añade como vulgarismo una –s final, y así encontramos el vulgarismo: Tú dijistes* En España, es común encontrar esto en la mitad norte, como dice aquí: En el habla de las tierras donde nació ...


10

YES! I think I first came across this topic on my favourite language blog and then I discovered my favourite word of this type somehow, which is in fact a Spanish word. pelón Here are the key definitions from the online DRAE: 1. adj. Que no tiene pelo o tiene muy poco. U. t. c. s. 4. adj. Ec. Que tiene mucho pelo. And in English without the ...


10

It actually depends on the region in which you are. As Omar said, frasco is quite understandable by all means with a proper context, but without it it can be interpreted differently. As the RAE definition states, frasco is mainly a glass made of some material, it can be glass, porcelain or whatever (Glass and porcelain are the most common interpretations ...


10

Complementing Alenanno's answer, I summarized this Wordreference thread : ¿Bueno?: Mexico ¿Sí?: Mexico, Spain ¿Aló?: Colombia, Chile, Peru, Costa Rica, Venezuela Hola: Argentina ¿Diga?: Spain, Argentina ¿Dígame?: Spain ¿Oigo?, ¿Dígame?: Cuba


10

Aquí, en España, usamos "Fuegos artificiales", sin que suene especialmente técnico. En tono coloquial, si está claro el contexto, tambien se dice a veces "los fuegos": ¡Vamos a ver los fuegos! ¡Vamos a ver los fuegos artificiales! La palabra "pirotecnia" y derivados no se usa en el habla coloquial.


9

Dialects There are three different terms used to describe this dialectal difference: ceceo, seseo, and distinción. Dialects that are said to have the ceceo use "th" instead of an "s" sound. Dialects with the seseo use the "s" sound. The distinción actually uses both, distinguishing between one and the other. Example For example, the words "casa" ...


9

Regardless of the time of the day, ¡Buenas! is understood as an abbreviated greeting. Couldn't elaborate more on the exact meaning of why it is used like this, but we have become used to it as a very generic and informal way of greeting. This is however a very informal greeting, so in any other situation Buenos días, Buenas tardes or Buenas noches should ...


9

Catalan is definitely a whole separate language, as in not a dialect of Spanish. It is significantly different. It sounds a bit of mix of Spanish, French and Italian, and in fact it's closer to the later two than to Spanish. Wikipedia article for Catalan has comparison of these languages.


8

The second pronunciation you mention is almost exclusively used in the Argentina / Uruguay region. Any other country in Latin America uses the first pronunciation.


8

Usually both words are used as synonyms, but as you mention it depends on the religion. In Mexico where most people are Roman Catholics both words tend to be used interchangeably, however, non-Catholic Christians tend to make a distinction, using Rezar for "reciting" (usually like reading parts of the Bible or reciting a memorized prayer like the Padre ...


8

As RAE states in the website it's an ambiguous name, i.e. it accepts both genders, so grammatically it would be correct to use any of them, unless for the expressions given there which just accept one. Depending on the region one is more used than the other. For example in Spain the people who live close to the sea (sailors) tend to say "la mar", though in ...


8

It is a regional choice, as with many other nouns. In Chile, billetera is the only translation of wallet (though we would understand the use of cartera from a foreign person), but cartera is actually purse, as in handbag: a bag a woman uses to carry stuff, which is usually much bigger than a wallet and does not fit in a pocket. In other countries, words ...


8

It is a regional variant of "haya" (first and third singular person, subjunctive present of the verb "haber"). You will hear that word from some people with low education in a natural manner, and also from well-educated people in an informal conversation, either trying to make a joke or just put emphasis on the word by pronouncing it incorrectly (especially ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible