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6

Parientes always means relatives, never parents I'm not pretty sure why your friends said that.


5

In modern, spoken Spanish, for the most part, yes, "parientes" means "relatives." However, it is worth noting that, according to the Real Academia Española, "pariente" can also mean, by definition number five: 5. m. pl. ant. Los padres. i.e. "parents" Note, however, that the RAE points out that this is an outdated definition, and therefore is currently ...


4

The original meaning of link, IIUIC, is each of the rings of a chain. That is Spanish is eslabón. (cf. The missing link / El eslabón perdido). Then, in English, link is also used to mean conection or even relation. That in Spanish would be conexión, enlace or relación. In Internet, link is actually a short form of the original hyperlink (remember that HTTP ...


4

Spanish is the old Castilian language, a Romantic one, related to Portuguese, Galician and Catalan, with influences from Arabic and French, and which has evolved naturally since, spoken nowadays in Spain, Hispanic America (including South of USA), Equatorial Guinea and Philippines. Ladino is the same old Castilian language, also romantic, also related to ...


4

I'm from Northern Spain. Here the most common is habitación: ¡Vete a tu habitación! - Go to your bedroom! However, on TV and books, it is probably more usual cuarto: ¡Vete a tu cuarto! Both are used with a posesive, thus tu habitación and tu cuarto means your bedroom or your room. But without the posesive, they may refer to any room, so in these ...


3

In Mexico... all 4 words are used for bedroom: Recámara also means chamber (the part of a pistol) Alcoba as @rodrigo says, is only used in books, novels and so on, although in some places (like hotels) you can find alcoba matrimonial referring to a wedding suite. Dormitorio could be "dorm", a place when you find lots of beds Habitación could be any ...


3

Use "cabra", that's the most universal word for goat. The other words are not goat exactly, such as "oveja" is sheep or "cordero" is baby sheep. I'm from Argentina. Hope this is helpful!


3

In México we can use vínculo or enlace but it is more common to use liga. The later is used in a day to day conversation, vínculo and enlace are more formal. By the way... ligar as a verb is used here when referring to flirting. ¿Cuál es la liga para comprar esa bolsa en ebay? Pásame la liga para entrar a tu sitio.


2

I am from Mexico City (DF) and I do not see any differences in pronunciation between "ll" and "y". For instance, I do pronounce the same way amarillo and Saltillo The same goes for ella, Troya, olla, paella


2

I'm not from Mexico but living in el DF have had a lot of norteño friends, mostly from Monterrey. People from the north tend to have a more rhythmic way of speaking that differs from the long drawn out syllables of the chilango in el DF. No maaaaanches weey súper Chilango. The northern accent can be a bit more lively and kind of 'chops' the words, commonly ...


2

As a native norteño speaker I can tell you there is not a single norteño "dialect" I'm from the northeast part of México (Tamaulipas, Nuevo León, Coahuila) and we speak different to Chihuahua speakers and northwest speakers(Sonora, Sinaloa). I thing the common factor is that sureños always ask if we are angry, I think our accent sounds aggressive to them. ...


2

Here in Chile, we say link, vínculo or enlace.


2

The original spanish pronounciation of ll is a palatalized l (full tongue against the palate). This sound diverged through time and different areas. In México you mean hear it as the y in yellow or like j in jello, whereas in most of Argentina and Uruguay you will hear it as sh in show. Don't worry much about the pronunciation. In general, spanish words are ...


2

I DON'T think "Hasta que tomé la píldora se me quitó el dolor." sounds good even in mexican. this would be correct "Cuando tome la píldora se me quitó el dolor" "Al tomar la píldora se me quitó el dolor" By the time means "in that concrete moment" or "from that moment on", so you can use any expression that means the same as "en ese momento", "justo ...


2

Verja or Cancela use to refer to metallic structures made of tubes. have you googled images to see the difference? a verja is a metallic structure made of tubes that keep people outside a zone, it is also used as gate in some zones. A cancela is a door/gate usually side to side with a verja, cancela is more used to refer to a metallic gate but can also be ...


2

There are a lot of dialects in Mexico as you can see here, but, according to your request you are looking for something more informal. So, based on this, and based on my experience as well, I can tell you that there are 4 main classifications: Norteño (North). Central (Central). Costeño (Veracruz, Tabasco, Oaxaca and Guerrero coasts). ...


2

Here in Chile we say pieza or dormitorio. Almost never habitación, and never, never alcoba, cuarto or recámara.


1

While it is true that the "y" and "ll" are pronounced as a palatalized English J, in practice the difference is small enough to make it irrelevant. For example, when I was a kid I used to live abroad and essentially grew up not speaking Spanish, so I tend to pronounce it as an English J. Pretty much the only relevant difference is how these letters are ...


1

To give you a simple answer, "parientes" always means "relatives". Yes, your parents could be your relatives and all of that, but we (in México) never use it that way.


1

My favorite translation of 'parientes' to English is 'kin', as it has a slightly broader connotation than simply 'relatives.' But in any case, it certainly includes parents. Looking at the primary definition from RAE (emphasis added): adj. Respecto de una persona, se dice de cada uno de los ascendientes, descendientes y colaterales de su misma ...


1

I am from central México. I would translate the sense of the sentences in question as follows: Hasta que tomé la píldora no se me quitó el dolor. Until I took the pill, the pain did not go away. And Hasta que tomé la píldora se me quitó el dolor. Only until I took the pill did the pain go away. I think the English translations I have ...


1

They may all have exactly the same meaning, they do not all have the same context. Cuarto - Quarters. Living quarters. It's a very ancient term in English, but it still lingers in the spanish language. Recámara, to me, makes me think of a hotel room, or a room for rent. Alcoba, I have never heard, but judging from the others' attempt to translate it, I ...


1

Here in Mexico it is normal to hear both versions, from my own point of view both are correct. However, Hasta qué tomé la píldora se me quitó el dolor. Is the one I would use. Another example: No lo vi hasta que llegué a casa Hope this helps.


1

Well, Ladino is ancient spanish, you can see antique pronouncitions or archaic words, some exampes: Words written with J in spanish were written with X some centuries ago for example "Tixera" > "Tijera", "Alexandro" > "Alejandro", "Muxer" > "Mujer" and pronounced as SH, they still have that sound or the sound of the french J Words written with H as "Hoja", ...


1

The three words are exatly the same, but enlace and vínculo are for the formal speech and text while liga and link are the "informal" ones but ther's no problem for using both words in formal talking. Personally I've never said liga, me and my environment use link. I'm from México. That's the link. Ese es el enlace. Ese es el vínculo. Esa es la liga. Ese ...


1

Link, in the meaning you describe, is indistinctly translated in Spain and Mexico as vínculo or enlace.There are no nuances when using one or the other, so probably is a matter of habitude in using one or the other. For example, Microsoft uses vínculo exclusively for their software localized in Spanish from Spain (es_es), and vínculo or enlace, depending of ...


1

I had a Mexican (American) Spanish teacher from the southern part of Mexico who would often pronounce "ll" like a "j." For instance, the word "brillo," was pronounced "bri jo" instead of "bri yo." And she pronounced "llamo" as "jamo." So apparently, that is an "accent" from that part of the country.


1

Since we can't hear a difference [Unless you pay attention to it] it doesn't matter how you pronounce it, we mix both letters and pronunciations so you'll never find a pattern [Maybe ther's a pattern but i think that is complicated and we just don't think about it, linguistics stuff], even sometimes sounds as "Measure". But you just have to check that never ...



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