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1

Back in the day, there was a difference, that is that you couldn't begin utterances with object pronouns. Thus "lo quiero comprar" would have been seen as vastly less formal (even agrammatical). That isn't the case today, and both are interchangeable.


3

I use to say: Quiero comprarlo. Estoy preparándolo. when I want to stress the fact that I am involved. The emphasis is in the implied subject I. In contrast, when I say: Lo quiero comprar. Lo estoy preparando. I am stressing the "it". The "it" is important. In both cases, I emphasize the first word (by increasing a little the volume ...


4

This is a matter of emphasis only. The meaning is exactly the same but the emphasis is in a different element: I, specifically me, want to buy something. -> Quiero comprarlo. I want to buy that, specifically that. -> Lo quiero comprar.


3

This is basically the English equivalent of the difference between I am preparing it. and I'm preparing it. Well, it's not the literal translation or the literal difference, but it has the same lack of prejudice. I am is used for formal writing or conversation; it makes you sound a bit more educated, while I'm is just a shortcut. A fallacy with ...


2

Both have related meanings linked to a group of people. When you are talking about a music band a gang you use banda: Tengo una banda de rock. I have a rock band. Una banda de ladrones. A thief gang. Banda sonora. Soundtrack, related to music band. In México you'll see: Banda de viento. Is a music band of northern Mexican music ...


2

Banda should be a smaller group. It has the meaning of a gang or a rock band. A banda doesn't have many individuals. The bando has a broader meaning, like a faction in a war (e.g. El bando aliado in World War II).


2

Banda means a small group of people with common activities (mussical band or gangster band). Bando means a part in a conflict that is choosen (voluntarily or not) and is translated in english as "faction". Using "Banda" as faction is weird at least in Spanier Spanish. PD: im spanish Warning! Banda in spanish also means both sides of an stadium or ...


4

While it is true that in Venezuela "cuchara" can be slang for vagina, it's a perfectly safe word to use. Everyone uses it and no one will think it's vulgar. "Cucharilla" is for small spoons like a teaspoon. "Cuchara" is for the bigger, soup spoon. Source: Born, raised and living in Venezuela.


11

I'll add an answer since the current accepted answer doesn't reflect the situation in Guatemala. The answer is very simple, too. In Guatemalan Spanish cuchara is the word you use. Context will make it very clear, and, unless you're among close friends, no one is going to assume you're using the slang term. Necesito una cuchara... Si no, no puedo comer. ...


5

Feel free to say cuchara, the situation and the context will be enough for your interlocutor to understand if your're talking about a spoon... or not. Although is told that in Guatemala people replace this word with the diminutive "cucharilla" when speaking about spoons to avoid confusion, it's not true: in Guatemala people do say cuchara for a spoon, and ...



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