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29

It’s a basic rule of Spanish phonotactics. In a nutshell, the structure of a Spanish syllable does not allow it: (C1 (C2)) (S1) V (S2) (C3 (C4)) A Spanish syllable consists of an optional onset, consisting of one or two consonants; a required nucleus, consisting of a vowel optionally preceded by and/or followed by a semivowel; and an optional coda, ...


15

Usted is a descendent of medieval Spanish Vuestra Merced, meaning "your mercy". It was an expression used to address upper classes in feudal Spain and evolved to be the general form of respectful address in the language in the seventeenth century or later. The letters "u" and "v" — like the letters "i" and "j" — were written the same in Latin. The choice of ...


11

Welcome to the site and thanks for asking here. A quick search shows this issue has made it into the press! I'll preface my answer by saying I'm not a native Spanish speaker, and I'm only speaking from what I've learned rather than from personal experience. First, addressing the question of the opinion of the Real Academia Española (RAE), the official ...


9

According to Wikipedia (English article, Spanish article), the use of the at sign (arroba) as a combination of o and a for gender-neutrality reasons has been growing in recent years. Proponents see it as a useful means of achieving gender-neutral spelling. Opponents argue that the -o ending already encompasses both sexes, and the use of the at sign is ...


7

It's dialectal, but very widespread. In many parts of Southern Spain and South America it's common to omit the last "s". It's never correct in standard Spanish.


7

You can see from the official Mexican seal, that the official, modern name is spelled with an X and not a J. (Source: Wikipedia) Furthermore, from @Richard's answer to another question is this article about the use of x versus j and the change that took place. Google ngrams also shows that, since roughly the mid 1850s, México has been the preferred ...


7

The Septiembre's entry on Diccionario Panhispánico de dudas says both forms are valid, but the preferred one is Septiembre: (...) pero en el uso culto se prefiere decididamente la forma etimológica septiembre.


6

Spanish words can't begin with sibilant blends, so when such a word is made or borrowed, an "e" is usually prepended to mesh with the pattern of Spanish pronunciation. It's not just "sp." Some English cognates, either with common Latin origins or borrowed anglicisms: esbelto (svelte) escasez (scarcity) esfera (sphere) eslogan (slogan) esmog (smog) esnob ...


6

Originally, the correct form was subscripción; however, over the years, the relaxation of the sound of the b in the consonantic group bs+consonant led to the simplification in the writing of bs+consonant to s+consonant. Both spellings are still used (the RAE lists both spellings as valid), but nowadays the simplified form is the one that is almost ...


6

Como comenta Javi, es un error de la aplicación. Puedes checar en la RAE que las formas correctas son: yo adelgace tú adelgaces él adelgace nosotros adelgacemos vosotros/ustedes adelgacéis / adelgacen ellos adelgacen


5

The usual spelling is socarrat, and that is Valencian or Catalan rather than Spanish. It can be translated as lightly burnt or toasted. The verb socarrar exists in Spanish; the participle is socarrado, and socarrat is the Valencian/Catalan literal equivalent.


5

Caribbean countries barely pronounce the ending S at all, Colombians, Cubans, Puerto Ricans. Manu Chao is quite a case. Since he (or mano negra / Former band) sings in French, Spanish, Portuguese, English and even in a dialect used between France, Spain and Portugal, which I can't remember the name. Grammatically speaking, when you write it THE S MUST GO, ...


5

The adverb expressing doubt should always be a single word: acaso. Here is the DRAE definition: acaso. (De caso). m. Casualidad, suceso imprevisto. adv. m. desus. Por casualidad, accidentalmente. adv. duda Quizá, tal vez. adv. neg. Ec. no (‖ indica la falta de lo significado por el verbo). Acaso he podido dormir.


5

You are right. This phenomenon goes all the way back to Vulgar Latin and applies to other Romance languages, as well. First of all, a little phonetics background: the vowels /e/ and /i/ are what phoneticians call front vowels, because they are articulated in the frontal part of the mouth, unlike, for example, /a/, /o/ and /u/, which are articulated more to ...


4

La RAE no ha incluido el uso de la @ para abreviar las frases que poseen elementos/personas/profesiones... al mismo tiempo. El uso de este "truco" o abreviatura es limitado y no lo verás en escritos serios (periódicos,libros...) y ahora mismo está limitado a, y esto puede acarrear un poco de debate "político", un intento de quitar "un toque machista" que ...


4

This doesn't answer the question directly but adds some related information. In Spanish dialects where an S preceding a consonant, is pronounced as an english H *, this wouldn't even be possible to pronounce, imagine pronouncing a word like Hpecial or Hparta * Argentina, Uruguay, parts of Spain and Central America, I think.


4

I could not believe it when I saw it but, apparently it is correct as this Spanish City Council person stated. Here is the RAE entry. I was born and raised in a Spanish speaking country and had never heard this way of saying "7th" but then again, Spanish is such a rich and old language that it would be foolish, to say the least, on my part to pretend to say ...


4

In spanish all syllables must have at least a "vowel sound" because without a vowel a consonant can't be pronounced. With vowel sound we can also add the letter "Y" in words like whisky (for syllable ky). So as all words starting with the sound "ESP"/"SP" should be divided in two syllables so S should be the first and P should belong to the next one. As the ...


4

Me gustaría añadir algo más. A pesar de que Setiembre está aceptado por la RAE, en España (al menos en la región de Valencia) se considera el uso de Setiembre como vulgar y a menudo se hacen bromas sobre este término desde que la RAE lo incluyó. I'd like to add something else. Althought Setiembre is accepted by the RAE, in Spain (at least in the Valencia ...


3

In Uruguay "setiembre" is more used than "septimbre". Even calendars and street names are written "setiembre".


2

"Setiembre" is valid everywhere, recently RAE made valid lots of eliminations of hard-to-pronounce double consonants (sétimo for séptimo, sicología instead of psicología, but funnily enough, psique cannot be written as sique).


2

"Usted" comes from the ancient Spanish word "vusted". The latter term is no longer used but its abbreviation "Vd" sometimes is. It's up to you which one to use.


2

It's very informal and mostly used on the internet, you won't find it in newspapers,TV, etc.


2

The official name is Estados Unidos Mexicanos or Mexican United States and it is only used in government official documents. The United States was added in part inspired by our northern neighbors, United States of America. In normal conversation we use only México. There are some efforts by some politicians to change the official name to just México.


1

In Argentina, Setiembre is accepted, but Septiembre is far more popular.


1

Both are correct, as a native Spanish speaker I can tell that I rarely see "sétima" written, but I think for such a picturesque place, this name makes it even more charming.


1

Correct, but a little antiquated. The same goes for September: Septiembre - Setiembre.


1

According to the wikipedia article, the C (and G) pronunciation diverged because of phonological reasons, it seems that quite early, and in common (at least in a first phase) with other romance languages (french, italian). See also the (in english, more general) wikipedia articles: C and G



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