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2

Means that the person was not born in Spain or have spanish citizenship but he feels spanish. I guess the doubt is between these two phrases: Yo soy español de corazón. Yo soy español, PERO de corazón. The first one is spanish, and he's proud of it. The second one is not spanish, BUT in his mind (or in his heart) he feels like he is.


4

I think it may need a comma ¡Yo más guapa! Me more, cuttie It is not an slogan, but a colloquial way of telling someone that you want or deserve or need something more than the other person. A:- No llego a fin de mes. Necesito otros 500 euros B:- Yo también, guapa In that context guapa is not a colloquial way to refer to somebody, but ...


7

You are missing a comma there. The phrase should be: yo más, guapa. guapa means good looking and it's a common way to affectionately address a woman in Spain. So the conversation goes more or less like this: A: - ¡I love you! B: - ¡I love you more, gorgeous!


0

Native spanish here. It means that he is from Spain and he's really proud of it, he loves his country.


1

I don't fully agree with guifa Yo soy de España, pero de corazón For me it's more like you are making more emphasys like wanting others to know how trully do you feel Spanish. It's like telling others "Hey, I am not saying this just to cause you a good impressión, I am telling it becuase I really think/feel that way".


1

But by heart I am Spanish, but by heart In English, we typically tend to use at heart to express this. Just as guifa worded it aren't actually from Spain, that's the basic meaning / motif of the irony. Por means but Mind you that por has not changed meaning whatsoever as you suggested. De corazón is just cultural phrase in the Spanish language that ...


7

The expression de corazón can be interpreted differently, depending on which definition of corazón you use. Per the DRAE: corazón: […] 3. m. Ánimo, valor, temple. 4. m. Buena voluntad. […] 6. m. Centro de algo In the sincerely sense, you're really using the 4th definition (effectively: “But in good faith / by my goodwill”). Based on a google search ...


1

A wooden knife cant cut, so it means that it would take a long time to kill someone with a wooden knife. Which means that this is a constant issue with her kid, and while it wont kill her it is certainly annoying. Just imagine yourself getting killed by a wooden knife, while it wont kill you, it will be very annoying while someone tries to do it. or a ...


1

Según el interesante diccionario Bogotalogo ("Usos, desusos y abusos del español hablado en Bogotá"): Parcero Amigo entrañable. La expresión se deriva del vocablo portugués parceiro. Y, en efecto, mirando en el diccionario Wordreference portugués-español, nos encontramos con: Gran diccionario español-portugués português-espanhol © 2001 ...


2

No es un insulto como tal, mas bien es una manera informal de referirse a alguien(conocido o desconocido). En mi opinión, parcero sería el equivalente del Inglés homie.


2

Yes, the other answer is correct. In Spain that expression is also known, but not particularly used. A small wooden knife doesn't cut at all, but it keeps ripping. If your friend says that to his kid, it means that the kid is not behaving well and your friend is feeling like irritated since the kid is acting like a knife that doesn't cut but don't stop ...


5

This phenomenon only happens in the pretérito imperfecto de subjuntivo; the other verbal forms you mention are, in fact, variations of this (the pluscuamperfecto is formed using the imperfecto form of the auxiliary verb haber, after all). Originally, only the -se form had this value, while the -ra form was the pretérito pluscuamperfecto de indicativo by ...


6

It seems that gracia comes from latin gratia and this one from gratus which means "agradable, agradecido" (pleasant, grateful). I don't think that those meanings are that opposed. We could find a common root for "divertido/gracioso" and "hermosura". In "la gracia de una cisne" it means "with movements pleasant to see" (hermosos, bellos, placenteros de ...


2

Gracia is a word with a lot of meanings. In RAE http://lema.rae.es/drae/?val=gracia you can found, among others: gracia. (Del lat. gratĭa). ... \5. f. Habilidad y soltura en la ejecución de algo. Baila con mucha gracia \8. f. Dicho o hecho divertido o sorprendente. So the sentences you show match these specific meanings: Tendría ...



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