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1

En mi sitio, el estado de California, la palabra "carro" tiene dos significados: coche y otro es carro de compras. Algunos dicen "carrito"


0

It means I always want to look at you because mirarte is a conjugation of mirarse but means to look at you.


0

As Kent said: it literally means I want to look at you always, but in a real context it doesn't mean it literally. I think she is using this phrase in a metaphorical or poetic statement, telling you that she wants to keep seeing you for a long time Hope it helps you!


0

Probably she would say: Yo quiero mirarte para siempre. I'm not entirely sure, but this sentence is just a way to flirt with you.


0

Literally, it means I want to look at you always. I am not sure if it is a local idiom with a double meaning.


0

La llave sirve para abrir y cerrar, puede ser para una puerta, el paso de un líquido (un grifo), o en sentido figurado el corazón u otras cosas. Clave no tiene nada que ver, aunque en inglés se use la misma palabra. Clave puede ser el conjunto de reglas y correspondencias que explican un código. Entiendo que en inglés pueden usar la misma palabra porque ...


0

I am of Mexican descent and have friends from Panama and Colombia that both understand pinche as "fucking." It is not just isolated to Mexico.


1

Llave generally is the real object to open doors, etc. Except some situations like other mentioned before I: llave de judo, etc. Clave is like a password. It is not tangible.


2

There are several pairs of words derived from classical languages that coexist and have similar meanings, but differ in that one remains attached to the root form, and the other evolves according to the Spanish phonological preferences.The name in linguistics for this phenomenon is doblete (in Spanish). I do not know if it's a rule, but I think that the ...


3

As Diego said, they both originate from the same latin word, so the meaning is naturally very close. In general lines, you will talk about a "llave" when it is a physical object (house key, water valve). I have heard some (old) Spanish people (my great-granma) even talking about "llaves de luz" (electric switch). If it is instead an abstract concept, you ...


7

The "llave" in the context of a faucet may also be called "llave de paso" and is the one that lets the pipes feed the faucet or the whole house water stream: We also use "llave" for some tools like "llave inglesa" (Monkey wrench) or "llave allen". We also use "llave" for "llave de judo", a movement of the martial art discipline in which you immobilize ...


0

¿Cómo como? ¡Como como como! How do I eat? I eat the way I eat! The first como (the one with the accent) is the word "how", introducing a question. The second como is "I eat". So is the third and fifth one. The fourth como is "the way". It is like the first one except that it's used in an indication, while the first one is used to introduce a question. ...


2

Cómo How / It is often used to make questions Como I eat as, like, such as. You are as good as him. -> Eres tan bueno como él. It is like a big monster. -> Es como un gran monstruo. You are such as a genious. -> Eres como un genio.


-1

(Yo) Como = I eat It comes from the verb comer. It is the yo form present tense. Cómo = How Sometimes when people want to say how in Spanish, they can say Cómo. One expression that has Cómo is ¿Cómo estás?


4

It's actually a good bit more than two words, but it's easiest to think when to use the accent then when not to. como (no accent) can be used as a verb (from comer), noun (dated word meaning a trick), adverb, conjunction, or preposition. cómo (accent) can mean either the interrogative/relative pronoun how? (¿Cómo estás? No sé cómo lo haces.) or can be ...


0

(yo) como = I eat cómo = how The accent tells you whether it's referring to the verb comer or the auxiliar how. Examples: Siempre como en casa antes de ir al colegio. = I always eat at home before going to school. ¿cómo estás? = How are you?


0

I was just told "te quiero". How do i know it's just "i like you"? Because I've heard her talk to her ex (when they were together) n end their convos with "te amo" or a right to the point; no grey area "i love you". It all depends where your relationship is at.


0

Avoid its use in Colombia, is a very vulgar word and is often related to street slang specially in north coast of our country. In large cities is not well seen as it denotes poor or street background, lack of education, intention to offense and in general defines a person as vulgar, not trustable.



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