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0

Receso es la traduccion exacta de break en este contexto. Como estuvo tu receso de invierno.


2

I agree with JMVanPelt that campesino is a peasant and granjero is a farmer. The other words from the comments refer to people who work the fields (not necessarily in a farm) and differ in the origin of the word Agricultor: Del lat. agricultor, -ōris. Labrador: Del lat. tardío laborātor, -ōris 'el que trabaja'. Labriego: De labrar y -iego.


1

I'm Chilean and in the 80s was a teenager (and therefore used the generational expressions present in "Mala onda"). I can tell you with certainty that the term "bomb" was not used, nor used today. But, as the author of the accepted answer says, the term "bomba" was widely used in the sense of "cool". And consider that the protagonist of "Mala Onda" is a ...


6

For someone who works in a farm you would use, most commonly at least, granjero. The root for campesino is campo (field, as in rural areas) and for granjero is granja (farm).


-1

when the Moores ruled in Spain, they had lookout posts on hilltops and it is said that in times of trouble they could call aid from Africa in a matter of hours by lighting the flames on top of the lookout towers, hence the connection between flame and call in Spanish


1

Bis comes from the Latin meaning twice. So in some countries you shout it to get what in the UK you would shout encore for. So it is twice a grand child not an encore grand child.


2

Bis, bi means two or twice; bisnieto means, roughly, twice the grandchild. I don't think bisnieto has the meaning of a bonus. From Definiciona: Este vocablo en su etimología esta compuesto del prefijo latino “bi” dos y del latín popular “nepta”, a su vez del latín “neptis” que quiere decir nieto.


2

Break means descanso but depending on the context and the length of that break you can translate it as vacaciones (when it is a long period such as Christmas, Easter), recreo(when children at school take their break) o pausa (when you go for a coffee or lunch in the middle of your workday).


0

En Bolivia se usa en la zona occidental (andina), con la variante que el siempre va al final. — ¿Vendrá fulano? — No siempre. Es reforzando la negativa. En este caso se usa si se insistió a fulano que viniese y decididamente no quiso venir.


0

Precisamente por esto es que mis hijos me dicen que no cuente chistes traducidos. Cómo se traduciría El colmo de los colmos: Que el mudo le diga al sordo que el ciego lo está mirando No me suena The final straw of all the final straws: Creo que prefiero Irony of ironies:


0

My Nicaraguan friend just told me colmo can be translated as a funny coincidence, like it would be a colmo if an architect's name was Armando Paredes. In that case, I agree that "irony" would be the best translation.


-1

Realmente el término se origina en su uso actual, en comunidades residentes en las comunas de Medellín, a donde llegó mucha gente desplazada del campo, en su mayoría labriegos (donde se utilizaba en un contexto más agropecuario). Las nuevas generaciones de hijos de los desplazados sin arraigo a la tierra,algunos de ellos con vínculos con el hampa local, la ...


1

Guapo and Guapa in the Dominican Republic is used primarily to indicate an emotional state in which a person is (usually not permanently) notably demonstrating anger, irritation, or discomfort towards another person/s or because of an event, or other concern, which is adverse and preoccupies or agitates the person. Similar to grumpy. "Los que perdieron el ...



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