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4

It's Surimi Why I'm telling that? I have searched in the RAE and others dictionaries and I haven't found the word. I have search in the net and I found sea food related. Caribbean Spanish is sometime mixed with English so the "me" in surime if you pronounce it in English sounds like "mi" in Spanish. Also, surimi is a type of crab imitation.


3

I google searched "sobadito comida" (please hold the easy jokes:P)and all the results I found refered both to "sobaos" and others refered to "bizcohos de soletilla" or "Melindros" but people called them sobaditos in some reciepes.


3

I had never heard about this word, but it seems to be somehow popular in slang to refer a leader of a small amount of people. However note it comes from Japanese, not from Spanish, and it is used in slang English. So, in principle, it does not have anything to do with Spanish. From Urban Dictionary: honcho A person in charge of some group or of ...


2

As a Costa Rican myself, I can tell you that it actually isn't pronounced as "my", it's similar, but you are missing the last "e". Mae is used in all kinds of situations it can express anger "Mae, que mierda." That can translate to "Shit, dude." The difference is that Costa Ricans can say that expression without actually talking to someone else, the mae ...


2

According to this reference it is slang for dude or just to refer to somebody. Mae can be used to mean "dude" between friends, or simply to refer to any man or woman ("ese mae te está llamando" = "that guy is calling you"). It seems that is actually pronounced like the English word "my" (although official language is Spanish, many Costa-Rican are ...


2

I'm from Costa Rica and I have been looking not for the meaning, but from which animal it comes, and by the way it is something similar to crab meat; the same color but I don't know where it come from.


2

'Sobar' is used also as "to knead". So a "sobadito" could means a biscuit of dough well kneaded.


1

Could you be referring to a 'sudado de mariscos' which is a kind of a soup but thicker? Your word may be a diminutive of this.


1

Looks like its derived from "sobado" ("well-worn", "shabby") by adding the diminutive suffix -ito. I don't think you can really express it in English exactly, and the particular meaning of the diminutive may depend on the content (e.g. "a bit shabby" seems to be a possibility).


1

I'm from Costa Rica and I have to admit that yes "surime" is a very peculiar word. The meaning of it is the name assigned to that peace of fake crab used in sushi, salads, etc. Costa Rica does not have big population of real crab, so, surime would be the "perfect" substitute.



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