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8

In Argentina: In informal conversation, it's roughly equivalent to 'terrific', as in very good, awesome For example, '¡El recital estuvo mortal!' meaning that it was really good, that I enjoyed it very much.


7

In Argentina, the word gringo was quite used in the past (not so much today, I'd say), specially in the inland, but with some ambiguity. Generally it pointed to people with "foreign" aspect (not from Spain or native America), presumably anglosaxon, specially english, blonde hair and pale-rosy skin, etc. But it was also applied sometimes to some Italian ...


7

"Esta es la casa mía" may be correct, but I've never heard it from the lips of any native Spanish speaker. We always say "esta es mi casa". We use the form "mía": If someone asks "¿de quién es esa casa?", and you answer "mía", or "es mía". In sentences like "ese es tu vaso y este, el mío". (In many other cases.)


6

Most common way that I hear in Argentina is ¿Qué (te) pasa? This can be used for the situation you described, as a compassionate "What's wrong?" But there are heaps of other ways that could be used just as well. The feeling for each is really found in the tone in your voice when you ask the question. ¿Qué pasó? - What happened? ¿Cuál es el ...


4

From your examples: Esta casa es mía. Esta es mi casa. The meaning is the same. I would say that example 1.) emphasizes more who does the house belong to. Pretty much like my and mine, I believe? I would use 2.) in a more casual way, something like Look! This is my house whereas 1.) is more for This is mr. Smith's house, that is mrs. Robinson's, ...


4

Contrary to Janoma, I've used the expression me encanta many times to refer to some girl I liked a lot, usually in confidence to some friend, as in Esa mina me encanta. Mina is slang for girl/woman in Argentina. Me gusta would also be ok, but with a lot less intensity, to the point that Esa mina me gusta would not make much sense. Esa mina me encanta is very ...


4

Note: Apologies for posting this here. I know this is not exactly the answer but it wouldn't fit as a comment. While looking for the origin of the word gringo, I found a reference to El Matadero, a short tale written by Esteban Echevarría around 1838. At the time, the word gringo was already known: Salió el gringo, como pudo, después a la orilla, más ...


3

In Perú we call gringo to every person (foreigners and locals) with blond hair, white skin, blue eyes, etc. I was told (not sure if this is real fact) that the word itself came from the phrase Green go! used by Americans in war to order their troops to move forward. But I would say that when we use gringo we refer, mainly, to Americans (USA).


3

Personally, I would not use me encanta to refer to somebody I just respect (however deeply). I would use it, however, to refer to somebody I admire very much or something that I like very much: Me encanta el trabajo de Bertrand Russell, creo que sus ideas son geniales. Me encanta Cervantes, pues El Quijote es una maravilla. Me encanta el cine, ...


3

In Spain, and as far as I understand, it has a powerful negative connotation. For example: La reunión fue mortal. The meeting was awful. However, and as it sometimes happens with other words, it may as well be used with exactly the opposite meaning. I haven't ever heard it that way, though. Wheat I have heard, as @Laura points out, is de muerte ...


3

I'm pretty sure it refers to something like a Caucasian and naive American, or any American Caucasian in general. My native language is Spanish, and I'm 99% sure that is what people mean when they say it.


2

I think that it would be translated perfectly as "sagaz". Se aplica a la persona que es hábil e inteligente y se da cuenta de lo que puede ocurrir "Astuto" would be just "clever", but "sagaz" would include the sharper and deeper connotations like your "but when you read the fine print you realize that it is carefully designed to be difficult to ...


2

I researched the origin of the word "gringo" when I was in graduate school after one of my professors offered the silly "green-go" myth as the explanation. The term has clearly been in use for centuries to describe non-Spanish people. The most widely accepted theory among etymologists was that the word was derived from "griego," the Spanish word for Greek. ...


1

Etymology isn't quite clear, but it's generally agreed that it's originates from Mexico or Central America. Meaning varies, and may mean: in Central America means principally an US American; in most of Hispano-America means foreigner of Anglo-Saxon origin; in some countries it means white Caucasian, especially blond one; Merriam-Webster definition is ...


1

I would say, that at least in Spain, the only one of them used in Religion is "salvado", as a participle of the verb "salvar". If you look up the definition in RAE of "salvar" you'd see this: tr. Dicho de Dios: Dar la gloria y bienaventuranza eterna. which I think it's the exact definition you're looking for. While for salvo the closest meaning ...


1

This is the first time that I see this word, "shrewd". By doing a quick search in wordreference.com you can see that it does mean "astuto". Now if you look for the definition of "astuto" it actually does not mean "intelligent" but the entry reads as: astuto, ta adj. Hábil, sutil, sagaz So in my opinion "astuto" would be used properly if you want to ...



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