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3

The following is what I have understood from the linked sources without me being a linguist: PIE had two different moods to express things that are not real: subjunctive (non-factual or depending on a condition) and optative (wish). Italic languages (among which, Latin) merged both functions into one. The new Latin subjunctive mood was (normally) ...


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It is perhaps worth saying that English does have an impersonal form. We can say 'one can visit'. In fact whenever this seems a reasonable alternative to 'you can visit' then the Spanish 'se puede visitar' seems natural. If not then some form with tu or Usted seems more likely. Note to native Spanish speakers seeking to improve their English: the use of ...


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Yes, you could use tú or vosotros (or usted, or ustedes, or vos) to the same extent you would use you in English. @alfdc80's answer, albeit correct-ish, overly emphasizes the possibility of using the passive reflective se to turn the verb into an impersonal construct. Many times this creates an unnecessary detachment between the speaker and their audience. ...



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