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8

Hay que tener cuidado en no confundir el adjetivo con el participio pasivo. En el ejemplo de las frituras (que es como se le denomina genéricamente a las cosas que han sido freídas) podemos construir una frase que contenga ambos elementos, haciendo uso de la oración dada en la pregunta original: El pollo está frito después de haber sido freído en ...


8

At least in Colombia one usually would say nuez, generically, if the context doesn't require the specific kind of nut; in the case of a recipe (or in any other context in which the difference matters) we, of course, have (and use) different names: Pacana (pecan): Nuez (walnut): Nuez del Brasil (Brazil nut): Avellana (hazelnut): And ...


7

Feo can mean ugly, disgusting, distasteful, etc. It can be applied pretty much to anything: food, people, situations, paintings... Rico can mean two completely separate things: rich and tasty. Example: Él es rico = He is rich Sabe rico = It tastes good! In some regions, the latter meaning only applies to food; in others it applies to other ...


6

According to WordReference, plátano is the standard/neutral Spanish word for the English "banana." Other regional words include: banana - used in Argentina, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Uruguay to refer to a banana (the plant or the fruit) banano - used in Central America, Bolivia, and Colombia to refer to a variety of banana cambur - used in Venezuela ...


6

Wikipedia has two possible explanations: (...) it is so called because originally it was eaten with the thumb and forefinger, and retrieving and eating the condiment resembled the actions of a pecking rooster (...) the name could be a simple allusion to the bird feed-like minced texture and appearance of the sauce So it seems that the origin of the name ...


6

According to Wikipedia, the Spanish word for the fruit of the date palm is dátil. The RAE definition defines it as: 1. m. Fruto de la palmera, de forma elipsoidal prolongada, de unos cuatro centímetros de largo por dos de grueso, cubierto con una película amarilla, carne blanquecina comestible y hueso casi cilíndrico, muy duro y con un surco a lo largo. ...


5

As Chewie pointed out, Most probably, it is baking powder of the brand Royal. The appropriate name is "levadura en polvo" in Spain or "polvos de hornear" in some South American countries. The use of Royal is a generic name such as using "Scotch tape" instead of "sticky tape".


5

The usual spelling is socarrat, and that is Valencian or Catalan rather than Spanish. It can be translated as lightly burnt or toasted. The verb socarrar exists in Spanish; the participle is socarrado, and socarrat is the Valencian/Catalan literal equivalent.


5

The correct spelling is Piloncillo and in some countries (Colombia, for example) it's also called Panela. It could be translated to English as brown sugar loaf or just brown sugar You can read this Wikipedia article for more information but here's an excerpt: Panela (Spanish pronunciation: [paˈnela]) is unrefined whole cane sugar, typical of Latin ...


5

From RAE: feo, a. (Del lat. foedus). adj. Desprovisto de belleza y hermosura. adj. Que causa desagrado o aversión. Acción fea. adj. De aspecto malo o desfavorable. El asunto se pone feo. And for rico: rico, ca. (Del gót. reiks). adj. Adinerado, hacendado o acaudalado. U. t. c. s. adj. Abundante, opulento y ...


4

Fighting Cocks are calmed by their handlers by placing the rooster's head in the mouth. Darkness causes birds to immediately begin the sleep cycle. It was explained to me (by a great Restaurant ower in Acuna, Mex.)that often as soon as the handler put the bird's head in his mouth he would often be pecked on the tongue. The spices in the salsa gives the ...


4

I would do what restaurants do, which is, use the original name if there isn't a similar or equal dish in the local country and just proceed to describe the dish, listing the ingredients that is made of and how the dish is served on the table (ie. decorated with herbs, sprinkled with ..., etc).


4

This is a common way of speaking about spiciness poco/ligeramente picante- mild picante - medium muy picante - hot If something is not spicy or slightly spicy we would say it is "suave".


4

When I lived in Nicaragua I learned how to make repocheta. From what everyone's saying I'm going to assume it is a Nicaraguan recipe. It seems that no one has heard of it outside of Nica. You would cook up a batch of red beans (I always put a clove or two of garlic in mine). Then you would blend them up with a couple of bell peppers, tomatoes, and an ...


4

It's Surimi Why I'm telling that? I have searched in the RAE and others dictionaries and I haven't found the word. I have search in the net and I found sea food related. Caribbean Spanish is sometime mixed with English so the "me" in surime if you pronounce it in English sounds like "mi" in Spanish. Also, surimi is a type of crab imitation.


4

In Spain, pay doesn't exist. Tarta is a generic word used for everything that is a dessert that is round; specialized deserts exist, like bizchoco which is a cake with a hole - like pound cake. Apple pie for example may be tarta de manzana. Pie, like American pie, is not so common so there is not a specific word for it. The pan may be called molde para ...


4

Perejil is different. Perejil = parsley (petroselinum crispum); looks the same as cilantro, but has a much milder, more neutral taste. (Parsley lacks the distinctive "soapiness" of cilantro that people seem to have such strong feelings about. cilantro = (Amer. English) cilantro/coriander (Coriandrum sativum). Looks like parsley but with a stronger, ...


3

According to the Wikipedia articles 1, 2, 3, there are three related species: Eryngium foetidum (en: culantro, Mexican coriander and long coriander; es: coriandro, cimarrón, culantro or recao), is originary from the tropical Americas (probably from Mexico), and has different common names including: «samat» (Guatemala), «cilantro de monte» (Venezuela), ...


3

I heard this plant being named cilantro or culantro in different countries across South America: While the name of its seeds is "coriandro" (a very fragant spice):


3

I google searched "sobadito comida" (please hold the easy jokes:P)and all the results I found refered both to "sobaos" and others refered to "bizcohos de soletilla" or "Melindros" but people called them sobaditos in some reciepes.


2

What should happen is given by many factors, including context and intent. Is it for a restaurant that you need this translation? Is it for a mid-school report? Is it for a deep analysis and further submission to a dedicated culinary magazine? That said, here are some thoughts: The country of origin is a bit difficult to know, and a vague question in ...


2

An idiomatic English translation of "rico" is "loaded." Usually, this refers to money, but in can refer to other things such as (food) nutrients, or spices, or pleasure. A "usage" of fea is "lacking." Again, this usually refers to lacking in beauty (ugly). In regard to milk, however, it could mean lacking in taste or nutrients, in a word, "thin."


2

I am not sure if repochetas is just for Nicaragua. I never heard any other country from centra america that they made repochetas. Repochetas at home we made it with beans, cheese (not the cheese from US) and cabagge salad. Cheese from central america is very different from other regions. Repochetas can have different styles like those that jrdioko ...


2

According to the Diccionario del Español de Nicaragua published by the Academia Nicaragüense de La Lengua (I have a printed copy, I can't find it online), it's a type of food consisting of fried tortilla with beans and cheese along with cabbage salad, onion, sour cream, ketchup, and vinegar: repocheta. f. Tortilla frita acompañada de frijoles y queso, ...


2

A lot of Central and South American countries actually now use English terms. These are the terms used in Guatemala, from personal experience: - cake --> pastel - pie --> pie - pastry --> pastelito, postre - tart - torta We also have a very popular type of cake that I believe is specific to the region, called magdalena. It's a sweet ...


2

I am actually shocked but according to RAE it seems that "freído" is actually accepted. (To see it, click on the link for the definition and then the "conj" button to see its conjugation. At the top in the middle is the "Participio" and both forms are displayed.) After a short Google search and a few hits in Yahoo answers and other language forums it seems ...


1

Comida para niños. Entonces en el ejemplo, la expresión correcta es: Sándwich para niños. Otra opción es Emparedado/bocadillo para niños. si quieres evitar el anglicismo.


1

@jrdioko One must differentiate between the general case and the particular cases. @Gonzalo Medina has already pointed you several particular cases, but I'd like to address the general case. The English word "nut" refers to all oily seeds produced by some wood trees and palm trees. It is the same for the Spanish word "nuez". When you refer to a particular ...


1

Looks like its derived from "sobado" ("well-worn", "shabby") by adding the diminutive suffix -ito. I don't think you can really express it in English exactly, and the particular meaning of the diminutive may depend on the content (e.g. "a bit shabby" seems to be a possibility).


1

the correct translation is leche bronca in most of the countries as stated on wikipedia however it could be leche cruda as you stated, however from what you've posted you live in Guadalajara (Mexico) and there they call it leche bronca.



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