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13

A “maría” in Spain is an easy-to-pass subject. The word “maría” in this sense is informal but widely used. The origin of the expression is interesting. In Franco’s times, there were three compulsory subjects common to every University degree: Physical education, Religion and Politics. They were really easy to pass (you had to do almost nothing) and they ...


10

Lo que yo hago (otros harán otras cosas): Te hace gracia y te sonríes :) Te hace gracia y te ríes :D Una sonrisa perversa: jejejeje (como levantando el labio superior por el lado derecho) Una sonrisa malvada: muahahahaha (como el malvado que se ríe cuando su trampa ha funcionado) Alguien metió la pata, te sorprendes y te hace un poquito de gracia: Juas Of ...


9

INRI es un acrónimo que singifica Iēsus Nazarēnus, Rēx Iūdaeōrum, es decir, "Jesús de Nazaret, Rey de los Judíos". Según la tradición cristiana, tal y como aparece en la Biblia, la razón por la que Jesús fue crucificado era que se había erigido como rey de los judíos. Como parte de las burlas de los soldados, le pusieron una túnica morada (que implica ...


8

They use "jajaja": the more "ja", the stronger the laugh. But there are variations, like jejeje, which is a less strong laugh and can be a nervous laugh or an "evil" laugh. Anyway, there seem to be "alternatives" for LOL in Spanish: CMC (casi me cago) = It means "I almost p**p my pants (from laughter)"; RAC (reír a carcajadas) = lol I've also seen "MDR" ...


7

It's a prefix. This is what RAE says: re-. (Del lat. re-). 1. pref. Significa 'repetición'. Reconstruir. pref. Significa 'movimiento hacia atrás'. Refluir. pref. Denota 'intensificación'. Recargar. pref. Indica 'oposición' o 'resistencia'. Rechazar. Repugnar. Significa 'negación' o 'inversión del significado simple'. Reprobar. Con ...


7

In Argentina, the word gringo was quite used in the past (not so much today, I'd say), specially in the inland, but with some ambiguity. Generally it pointed to people with "foreign" aspect (not from Spain or native America), presumably anglosaxon, specially english, blonde hair and pale-rosy skin, etc. But it was also applied sometimes to some Italian ...


7

Additional to Alfredo's answer I would like to add some context. You can answer as you can answer to any greeting. Be aware I am not a Mexican native speaker, although I have friends that come from Mexico. Bien, gracias. No mucho. Nada Super bien. Super mal. etc... Now, as a bonus I tease my friends taking the phrase literal. ...


6

Possible responses are: Nada. Aquí nada más. Todo bien. Todo perfecto. Echándole ganas. Echándole. Aquí echándole (ganas). Nariz: Pretty casual and informal which means nada. You can add the "¿Y tú?" to the end of the sentence.


6

In the context where I live this expression is used to denote a type some type of excess. A: El profesor de matemáticas nos encargó, el día de hoy, resolver cien problemas algebraicos para mañana. B: ¡Ah se la baño! Son muchos. In the example above it means that the professor let his students a lot of work, I don't think you can translate (even ...


5

Here it goes some light words for it maldito / maldita condenado/ condenada puñetero / puñetera dichoso / dichosa (thanks to MikMik) And this other one which is stronger. It is considered a swearword. All of them are adjectives and are usually used before a noun (not after it), e.g. Apaga la maldita televisión I think all ...


5

Es una abreviatura muy extendida por gran parte de latino américa y España. Se usa sobre todo en el lenguaje coloquial y es similar al caso de las terminaciones -ado -ido ... en los verbos que suele eliminarse la letra "d" ¿Has "terminao" los deberes? No, mamá son pa' pasado mañana. En ningún caso se utiliza en el lenguaje escrito


4

This is very common in Mexico as well it is considered very improper but it is used very often in social situations to *re*enforce and *re*mark a word. The most common is El examen fue redifícil to say it was not just hard but (rehard) and it just as absurd in English as it is in Spanish.


4

There are several theories as to the origin of Chido the one that is the most accepted one is that it came on the migratory waves of the XIX century coming from Asturias in Spain. From the word xidu in asturian, that practically means beautiful, and nice. The term first appeared officially in Mexico under the dictionary of criminal slang of Carlos ...


4

Note: Apologies for posting this here. I know this is not exactly the answer but it wouldn't fit as a comment. While looking for the origin of the word gringo, I found a reference to El Matadero, a short tale written by Esteban Echevarría around 1838. At the time, the word gringo was already known: Salió el gringo, como pudo, después a la orilla, más ...


4

Yo diría que es más una elisión que una sinalefa, pero además se cambia la "x" por "s". Como figura retórica, entrecomillada o en letra cursiva, para indicar que alguien pronuncia de esta forma "me explico", cabe cualquier "atentado lingüístico", pero en otro caso es inaceptable en un escrito formal. En otro caso, podría extenderse este recurso a cualquier ...


4

Microsoft Word está en lo correcto. El pronombre enclítico debe concordar aquí con el objeto indirecto ("los integrantes") y por lo tanto va en plural. Sin embargo mi tendencia sería también a usar el singular (pues me suena mejor y más natural) pero no lo haría en un documento serio.


4

Según la HISPANOTECA > Gramática española ¿Cómo me le va? le es el complemento indirecto. me -> es un dativo ético Este “dativo ético” pertenece a los llamados dativos superfluos. ‘Dativo ético’, “especialmente expresivo y coloquial. Se emplea sobre todo con el pronombre de 1. persona”: Había ido el gato y se me lo ha comido; Vosotras no me ...


3

Chocar literally means "to crash." For example, it's used to describe an unexpected meeting between two automobiles. Colloquially, it means to clash or annoy. Someone acting obnoxious or confrontational is frequently described (at least in Argentina, where I learned the language) as chocante. So: Me choca que cuando estoy dormido suene el teléfono y ...


3

This is definitely regional, but many (most?) Spanish countries don't have a problem with using swear words, except in very formal contexts. As an example, we found it silly when they bleep them out in american TV shows. Some not-too-hard expressions used in Argentina are del orto and carajo: Este auto del orto no quiere arrancar. Tengo un calor ...


3

In Perú we call gringo to every person (foreigners and locals) with blond hair, white skin, blue eyes, etc. I was told (not sure if this is real fact) that the word itself came from the phrase Green go! used by Americans in war to order their troops to move forward. But I would say that when we use gringo we refer, mainly, to Americans (USA).


3

Is 're' an abreviation of another word? (Maybe realmente?) Sometimes it's used as recontra, especially if used as stand alone word. Not sure of the etymology, my first thought would be bidding in contract bridge where one of translation of double and redouble is contra and recontra. But that just my impression, could be totally wrong. A derivative of ...


3

Sí, es lo mismo. También se puede usar "chisme de callejón". Chisme de lavadero proviene de que en algunas "vecindades" (aplica también para "callejones" en otros países), se solía contar con un solo "lavadero" (lugar donde se lava la ropa, una fuente de agua con suficiente espacio para tal fin, sin ser una lavandería propiamente) para todos los habitantes. ...


2

I think you know the meaning now. But the origin turns out being, to me, an rhythmic euphemism to for the most common and vulgar expression te la mamaste, which has the same meaning. Te la mamaste and te la bañaste have the same syllable at the end, same rhythmic, same vowels. If you hear a twangy version of both expressions, you cannot tell which is which. ...


2

It is used to denote excess or exaggeration. Here is how I would translate it: A: El profesor de matemáticas nos encargó, el día de hoy, resolver cien problemas algebraicos para mañana. B: ¡Ah se la baño! Son muchos. A: The math teacher gave us, just today, 100 algebra problems to solve by tomorrow. B: Wow, he/she swamped you. That's a lot. A: ...


2

I researched the origin of the word "gringo" when I was in graduate school after one of my professors offered the silly "green-go" myth as the explanation. The term has clearly been in use for centuries to describe non-Spanish people. The most widely accepted theory among etymologists was that the word was derived from "griego," the Spanish word for Greek. ...


2

As others have pointed, pa / pa' is a common colloquial variant for para. You will hear in Latin America and Spain. Maybe it's more extended in some places than others, for example Andalusia in Spain, but I'm sure you will find someone that uses it at least from once in a while everywhere. It is not a regionalism. And as Aracem has said, its not for written ...


2

Yo, influído por ese vocabulario, pensaba que cuanto más atrás en el tiempo más se pecaba de inocente (hasta niveles cercanos a este lugar común). Se me curó el prejuicio en cuanto me leí La Celestina y vi la profusión de hideputas que gastaba Fernando de Rojas. La respuesta a tu primera pregunta probablemente sea que tienes razón, no sé si por censura del ...


2

Bueno cuando dices Controlar, no es solo Vigilar, porque vigilar es estar atento para que no pase nada. El controlar sería verificar que tus pertenencias sigan siendo las mismas. Osea sabes que pertenencias tienes, y verificas que sigas teniendo las mismas sin cambios. Vigilar sería ir mirando que nadie se acerque y te haga nada. Es una medida preventiva. ...


2

En España, entre amigos, todo el mundo dice “tío” (guy, dude), desde el presidente del gobierno hasta la persona más humilde. La excepción podrían ser las personas mayores de las zonas rurales. En la conversación normal, hablando coloquialmente, “tío” es universal en España. Llega a cansar, aunque en situaciones formales no se usa nunca. Otras ...


2

English In Mexico and Central America: vato güey carnal paisano In Venezuela and some other Caribbean countries: pana In Ecuador: ñaño In Perú: pata causa In Agentina: tipo (very informal) Español En Mexico y centroamérica: vato güey carnal paisano En Venezuela y otros países del Caribe ...



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