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12

Here in Chile, mateo / matea means someone who studies very often, someone diligent who always does his homework at school or college. According to "Voces de origen lunfardo en el registro festivo del diario chileno La Cuarta" 1 , its origin comes from the word mate which means head: mate  → head mateo  → someone who ...


5

I had never heard this expression. Upon research I could find that the expression does not only use "venir" but also "estar", "andar", etc. Then, I found out that DRAE has a mention to it, in which it indicates that it is typical from Chile, no other countries: maleta3 m. y f. Persona que practica con torpeza o desacierto la profesión que ejerce....


4

I want compliment the accepted response indicating something that is quite obvious for speakers of Spanish and therefore not specified: The idiom "andar de maleta" comes from "andar de mal humor" (or "de mala cara"). This is a rhetorical game called paronomasia in which a signifier is replaced with another very similar, in this case "mal humor" for "maleta"....


4

Tu pregunta me dio mucha curiosidad. En Argentina nunca oí esa expresión, con lo cual me parecio mas interensate todavía. Estuve buscando en internet y yo creo que este Video da la explicación mas convincente. En el video el profesor Campusano comenta que es un gran fántico de Gardel y que conoce muchos de sus misterios. Por ende ha leído mucha bibliografía ...


4

There's a lot of sociolinguistic issues going on between tú vs Vd. If someone is younger than you, you can generally use tú, but the details are best left to one of the questions on here more directly suited to it, but when in doubt, use Vd.. Omiting the pronoun can always (and, preferentially) be done with tú. With Vd. it is better to include since you ...


3

Since you are addressing someone you don't know I would use "usted", except if you are addressing to someone much younger than you or if depending on the context may seem inappropriate to be too serious or too formal. To me, #3 is the one that sounds best (along with #5). Note that #1, #2 and #5 should be ¿Disculpa (o perdona), hablas inglés? and ...


3

That word "bomb" (or "bomba" in Spanish) was (and sometimes is) used not only in Chile but in Argentina also. In phrases like: ¡Esto es una bomba! (This is so awesome/cool!) And: ¡La pasamos bomba! (We had a very good time!) But as you said it was used more in the '80s and it's not used very often now.


3

Como en cualquier otro idioma, muchas palabras tienden a contraerse en sus formas de uso informales. Yo no se como se usa en otros países, vivo en España, pero como dice pickoka en la Península ibérica suele usarse Pos. Mi respuesta final, es que Po como contracción de Pues no llega a algunos países, como por ejemplo España, pero es probable que esos ...


3

In Spanish we don't need to emphasize or clarify the subject as in English or French, the conjugation tell us clearly. So, from your 6 choices in the first 4 you can avoid to say the pronoun. Guifa explais it very well. Now, about your options: The 1 and 2 are incorrect for me, in the way that don't sound natural. Not for a native speaker. And if you want ...


2

No es un insulto. Es el gentilicio de la zona de Chiloé, un hermoso archipiélago al sur de Chile. El diálogo que transcribes claramente se desarrolla entre chilenos. Tanto weón como chilote son sólo epítetos informales, no insultos. Weón es una forma estandarizada que tenemos los chilenos para tratarnos con familiaridad (aunque a veces sí es un insulto). Y ...


1

I'm Chilean and in the 80s was a teenager (and therefore used the generational expressions present in "Mala onda"). I can tell you with certainty that the term "bomb" was not used, nor used today. But, as the author of the accepted answer says, the term "bomba" was widely used in the sense of "cool". And consider that the protagonist of "Mala Onda" is a ...


1

"Po" is a word that we use in different situations. I think comes from the transformation or mutation from the words "pues". I have been in Brazil, Perú, Colombia, Uruguay , Paraguay, Dominican Republic and Bolivia; never heard "po" none of these countries. Different and multiple uses here in Chile can be found; in those you can hear: Next to afirmattions ...



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