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22

When you're speaking about the location where an event takes place then the verb "ser" is the one you have to use: El partido será en el estadio. El partido estará en el estadio.* (Incorrect) El concurso de monólogos es en el pabellón número 5. El concurso de monólogos está en el pabellón número 5.* (Incorrect) if it's not an event (it's ...


13

Although it is true that estar usually indicates a non-permanent, temporary condition whereas ser usually signals a permanent condition, you have to take into account that estar is normally used to express a condition resulting from a transformation, process or actual change, and ser is normally used when referring to an inherent characteristic, with no ...


12

I think a possible explanation (and how I understand it) is "Está hecho de..." refers to the object being "manufactured with" so the verb refers to the fact that the object was manufactured and "es de madera" refers to the permanent fact that the table is made of wood. Actually you can't say (or is not exactly correct) "el árbol está hecho de madera" "the ...


11

This answer has grown enough to require an outline. Here it is: "¿Qué hora es?" versus "¿Qué hora está?"* "estar" versus "ser" "a state" versus "an attribute" "¿Qué hora es?" versus "¿Qué horas son?" 1. "¿Qué hora es?" versus "¿Qué hora está?"* I feel tempted, like others, to write that Spanish uses the verb "ser" to ask the time, simply, because ...


8

In Spanish (as in Portuguese), estar is used for things that are transient in nature or potentially changeable; ser is used for things that are consistent or stable. The only difference I can find is that in Spanish, estar is used for location, among many other things, but ser virtually never is. In Portuguese, both estar and ser are used, based on whether ...


7

Indeed you can also say the same sentences with the verb "ser" instead of "estar" with a difference in meaning: Él es gordo: he is a fat person. Él está gordo: He is fat right now (he can lose weight in a future or he's fatter than usual). Él es viejo: he is old. Él está viejo: He looks old. El coche es caro: this model of car is expensive (in general). El ...


7

(disclaimer, I'm a native Spanish speaker, so I find it funny that both 'ser' and 'estar' use a single word in some languages) The point isn't that you sometimes use 'ser' and sometimes use 'estar'. They're two different concepts. In short, "ser" relates to the very being of something, while "estar" is (usually) a temporary condition. That's why you say ...


6

"Ser casado" can have two differnt "connotations" The passive form. You are married BY someone. Check this Groucho Marx quote in Spanish and in English. It can also mean "to be married" in sentences like "soy un hombre casado" (I'm a married man) although in specific that case, I would say it's a pre-made sentence. No one would say (at least in Spain, ...


6

An almost literal translation is indeed a right option: Present: ¿Cómo está el bistec? ¿Cómo está siendo tu día hasta ahora?  →  (you should use present continuous (gerund) in case the day hasn't finished yet). ¿Cómo está el tráfico hoy? Preterite: ¿Cómo estuvieron tus vacaciones? ¿Cómo estuvo la reunión? ¿Cómo ...


5

Because estar is used to signify that they weren't always dead--that they were once alive. Ser is used to indicate a state of being--that they were always that way and always will be. To say es muerto is incorrect because they used to be alive. Therefore, estar.


4

It's just a matter of stress. If the stressed syllable is the first one, you don't write the accent. If it's the last one, you do. You know, the rule states that "if the stress is in the last syllable and it ends in vowel, n or s, you must write the accent". Besides, está and esté are forms of the verb estar, whereas esta and este are demonstratives or ...


4

To be honest I never thought about it. It has been so natural to be saying "de donde fue"...our population has been saying that for decades. We had a big major earthquake in 1972 that destroy most of our city. So people started to have those type of references. To complicate more the things we do not have street names which can be very confused. We use ...


4

While agreeing with Gonzalo Medina's explanation, I would like to add my rule of thumb for this one. "Ser" means that the property does not change for the object, while "Estar" means a transition. So, "él está muerto" because he was alive before, but "mi camiseta es verde" because it will not change by itself(*1). In the case of "verde", you can also say ...


4

This is one of those expressions that you should not try to translate from a language to another. You are not actually asking about the time, but about the hour. That What time is it? is sort of Which is the hour? when asked in Spanish, so you are identifying one of the 24 moments in which we have divided the day. We are not identifying a property of time, ...


3

I'm not from Nicaragua, but "De donde fue" sounds like something unique to Nicaragua. Here in Chile, we say "De aquí, 3 cuadras hacia ..." and "Desde el estadio, 3 cuadras hacia..." UPDATE If you're refering to something that was there but does not longer exists, that's more rare, but you could expres it as Donde estaba el estadio, 3 cuadras hacia ... ...


3

Ser and estar can both be translated as "to be." But its use depends from the context: La manzana está verde. (condition: verde = unripe) La manzana es verde. (essential characteristic: verde = color green) It's perfectly valid to say La mesa está hecha de madera and to say La mesa es de madera Both are the same. But, suppose we need to talk ...


3

You can say "Juan es gordo" and "Juan está gordo" Both in english are "John is fat". But the first one points to a characteristic feature of John, a property that qualifies him. The second one is similar, but emphasizes that he is fat at this moment. The first one suggests a permanent or stable property (or at least does not imply anything ...


2

I can't explain this with technically correct terms, but when using a participle verb, as hecho (and not the passive voice, which would be hecho also) you never use es and rather use está. The permanent/transitive state rule that you cited is right, but doesn't apply in this case. In all this cases, está is used and never es (when using participle): la ...


2

As Javi mentioned, a better translation is: Estoy emparentado con David. When to use ser vs. estar is always difficult for foreign speakers. While the rule of thumb is that ser is used for something permanent, there are many exceptions that you'll just have to learn using the language. That said: what about inlaws? That relationship is not necessarily ...


2

Soy muerto is not incorrect, just not commonly used: ¿Piensas tú que no soy muerto por no ser todas de muerte mis heridas? Pues sabe que puede, cierto, acabar lo menos fuerte muchas vidas; mas está en mi fe mi vida, y mi fe está en el ...


2

Both forms are allowed, and they have slightly different meanings. ¡qué gordo está! You might use this when referring to somebody that didn't use to be so fat (be it a friend, a celebrity on TV, etc) ¡qué gordo es! You might use this when referring to somebody that is very fat, and whom you didn't know in a different shape. ¡pobre abuelo! ...


2

I believe that estar is used not for "temporary" but "non-permanent" situations. Being fat may be "temporary" or not, but it is not necessarily "permanent." Old is longer-lasting. But even then, one hasn't ALWAYS been old. On the other hand, "soy un hombre," or "soy una mujer." Once a (fe)male, always one (barring a sex-change operation)>


2

There's no difference. "Ser cierto" is a bit more formal way for "ser verdad" but they are interchangeable in most of cases.


2

As comments state, permanence is not always the key to choose between ser and estar. When combined with the past participle of a verb, "ser" creates a simple passive, "estar" expresses the state. So e.g.: Ser casado = Get married, to enter into marriage Estar casado = Be married, to be in a marriage This should explain why you need "estoy" in your ...


1

Once in a while, the term "estar soltero" is used to describe a married man, usually with whimsical or humorous intent. It can range from something like the English slang phrase, "he's batching it this evening" to something carrying some innuendo. This doesn't directly answer your question, but the use of "estar casado" when "ser casado" might have been ...


1

you should think as 'cierto' = right / correct and 'verdad' = true. 'cierto' it's normally used as "es cierto" which means "that's right." while "verdad", normally used as "es verdad" means "that's true.' ser cierto / ser verdad, even it can be ok depending the sentence, it's not used quite often.


1

The verbs ser and estar, one of the most complex things to explain, since in english estar = to be and ser = to be SER: to be, as in "To be or not to be", to have an intrinsic quality. Examples: be a good boy/sé un buen chico. she is a good girl/es una chica buena ESTAR: to be someplace, to feel some way, to have some relative/external quality. Examples: ...


1

Both "ser casado" and "estar casado" can be use without to refer who is the wife. But only "estar casado" can be use to refer to the wife. Yo soy casado (solteras, no me miren!). Él sí está casado. Yo estoy casado con María. Yo estuve casado con ella.


1

I would say is a slang from Nicaragua, I would describe that usage as a solecism , it happen with every language and in every country, as a matter of fact the usage of "de donde estaba" doesn't seem quite correct either UNLESS the place you are referring is not there anymore.


1

The way I see it: es cierto = it's true es la verdad = it's the truth es verdadero = it's authentic Note, that "verdad" is noun, not adjective.



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