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10

On this website you can see all the possible uses of infinitives in Spanish. It's written in Spanish, but it basically says that: In Spanish, infinitives can play the role of a substantive. While playing the role of a substantive, infinitives can act as the subject of a sentence. While acting as the subject of a sentence, infinitives may or may ...


6

Just to complement the good @AlexisPigeon answer, I want to make it clear that it's not el avestruz "in order to avoid two same vocals together" -which is known as cacofonía- as you said in your question... That happens with some feminine nouns such as el agua or el hacha, but in this case it's just because avestruz is a masculine noun and that's all! If ...


6

It's masculine, so you would say el avestruz and los avestruces. The confusion might come from ave, which is feminine.


6

al is basically contraction of a el. Ir a bar would be go to bar. Which is grammatically incorrect. Correct version is go to the bar or go to a bar. Thus correct Spanish version is ir al bar or ir a un bar. In case of proper names (places, people), you don't usually prepend them with article (there are few exceptions). Thus the correct form is to say vamos ...


6

To add to MikO's nice answer: In the example, both forms are correct, the second one (without article) is slightly more natural and frequent. When the infinitive is used as noun, but not as the subject, the article is always omitted: "Me gusta comer". Further, even when the noun is used as subject, but it is placed after the verb, the article is almost ...


5

"... in order to avoid two same vocals together." You're a bit wrong here about the rules to apply in order to avoid cacofonía. Even if avestruz were female, the proper way to write it would be "la avestruz". In order to apply the "cacofonía avoid rule" (sorry for the expresion invention) you need two conditions: The word must start with an "a" (or "ha" ...


5

I am from Argentina and I never say or hear "el Chile", but "la Argentina" is quite accepted and used. The standard explanation of this apparent anomality is that "Argentina" is originally an adjective, tied to the (often tacit) substantive "República", so that the full expression would be "la República Argentina" (analogously to "los Estados Unidos"). ...


3

Because if what's next to the "ir a" is a noun then that noun must be accompanied by the corresponding definite article and the noun. You can also use the contraction "al" instead of "a el" when the noun is masculine. So this could be written as: Ana y yo vamos a ir al bar. Ana y yo vamos a ir a el bar. × Ana y yo vamos a ir a bar (No definite ...


2

As others have said, al = a+el in all senses. However, do not under any circumstances use it in a proper noun, like El Paso, where the artículo definido is a part of the name. (x ) Voy Al Paso, Texas. (✓) Voy a El Paso, Texas. However, some countries require a artículo definido, when it is not part of the name. Voy a la India. Voy al ...


2

You are right, most times an article is used before the noun with the exception of personal pronouns and a few more things. "La chica" "El país" are right "La María" "El México" are definitely wrong, it even sounds wrong. For personal pronouns you only use the proper noun. "Maria" "México" When the noun is use in definitive/undefinitive sense: "Las ...


1

I think, in this case, you can ommit the article. As MikMik says, it's common in Spain use the article when you mention a restaurant: Ayer cené en el Fridays - Ayer cené en el [restaurante] Fridays If you mention the restaurant as a space, colloquially you usually will hear: Que opinas del [restaurante] Fridays? But, if you are mentioning the ...


1

The name of the restaurant is a proper name, and therefor, formally, it isn't written with an article. At the other hand, you might hear a lot of people using an article. Certainly when people get familiar with a certain place or when it is a place everybody knows, they will probably use an article (although this might also be geographically dependent). If ...


1

The names of some places, such as "El Salvador", "El Cairo" or "La Haya" always include the article (just as "The Hague" does in English). For some others you can optionally add the article, the RAE lists several examples in the page about the definite article "el". (el) Afganistán, (el) África, (la) Argentina, (el) Asia, (el) Brasil, (el) Camerún, (el) ...



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