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11

On this website you can see all the possible uses of infinitives in Spanish. It's written in Spanish, but it basically says that: In Spanish, infinitives can play the role of a substantive. While playing the role of a substantive, infinitives can act as the subject of a sentence. While acting as the subject of a sentence, infinitives may or may ...


9

In Spanish we have several constructions that can translate your sentence, That's the one that I eat the chicken with: Es con esa que me como el pollo Con esa es con la que me como el pollo Es con esa con la que me como el pollo Esa es con la que me como el pollo Maybe the most grammatically correct is the first one, but I'd say the other three ...


8

The reason is that the names of some countries have the article included in Spanish. India is one of them. Some of these countries could optionally have the article in front of the name, such as (El) Afganistán (La) Argentina (Las) Bahamas So, in Voy de viaje a (la) India The article "la" could be optional. It wouldn't be the case ...


7

It's masculine, so you would say el avestruz and los avestruces. The confusion might come from ave, which is feminine.


7

To add to MikO's nice answer: In the example, both forms are correct, the second one (without article) is slightly more natural and frequent. When the infinitive is used as noun, but not as the subject, the article is always omitted: "Me gusta comer". Further, even when the noun is used as subject, but it is placed after the verb, the article is almost ...


6

Some situations in which you need to use the definite article include: The article precedes the noun, even if there is an adjetive in between. El coche. La raqueta. El asombroso trapecista. El milagroso elixir But never when it precedes the names of people or places It can precede the name of people or places when (and only when) it is used to ...


6

Just to complement the good @AlexisPigeon answer, I want to make it clear that it's not el avestruz "in order to avoid two same vocals together" -which is known as cacofonía- as you said in your question... That happens with some feminine nouns such as el agua or el hacha, but in this case it's just because avestruz is a masculine noun and that's all! If ...


6

al is basically contraction of a el. Ir a bar would be go to bar. Which is grammatically incorrect. Correct version is go to the bar or go to a bar. Thus correct Spanish version is ir al bar or ir a un bar. In case of proper names (places, people), you don't usually prepend them with article (there are few exceptions). Thus the correct form is to say vamos ...


5

Is an acceptable common practice. It hasn't been done for brevity in the headline. Some names of countries must have the article (eg. El Salvador), while others can have it or not (El) Afganistán; (La) Argentina; (Las) Bahamas; (La) India. I think "Estados Unidos" only needs to have the "los" when we refer to the country as "Los Estados Unidos de ...


5

My answer is only based on my experience as a user language Spanish of Chile, I don't know if there rules on the matter. For us the name of the country is Estados Unidos. Users don't have awareness that we are talking about "a group of states that are united", in which case would feel the need of an article. A map translated into Spanish label the country ...


5

Tu pregunta no se refiere tanto al uso del artículo como al uso del verbo haber, en este caso la palabra "hay". Se trata de una estructura fija muy frecuente, encabezada por alguna de estas formas verbales, según el tiempo: había, hubo, hay, habrá, va a haber Lo que viene después del verbo es una frase nominal que funciona como complemento directo. ...


5

I am from Argentina and I never say or hear "el Chile", but "la Argentina" is quite accepted and used. The standard explanation of this apparent anomality is that "Argentina" is originally an adjective, tied to the (often tacit) substantive "República", so that the full expression would be "la República Argentina" (analogously to "los Estados Unidos"). ...


5

"... in order to avoid two same vocals together." You're a bit wrong here about the rules to apply in order to avoid cacofonía. Even if avestruz were female, the proper way to write it would be "la avestruz". In order to apply the "cacofonía avoid rule" (sorry for the expresion invention) you need two conditions: The word must start with an "a" (or "ha" ...


4

Gavin, I am also a beginner learner of Spanish, and I also have been mystified about the use of el, la, los and las. I have come to the conclusion that they are no simple rules to determine when they need to be used, and when not; otherwise they would be in every beginners textbook, wouldn't they? This is what I have surmised, picking up morsels of ...


4

Del is the contration between De + El (note this is el article it, and not él pronoun he). Voy a casa de el doctor is wrong, you say Voy a casa del doctor instead. There is no contraction for De + La however (Voy a casa de la doctora is ok). Keep in mind this rule don't apply if the article el is part of a name: Traje este sombrero de El Paso is the correct ...


3

Lo que generalmente he visto en España es que se considera (no sé si correcta o incorrectamente) que la omisión del artículo es influencia anglosajona y debe evitarse (al igual que Las Mayúsculas Innecesarias). Por lo que veo aquí, y aquí, y en línea con tu ejemplo, en Argentina también ocurre: «No omitir artículos ni proposiciones». Esta empresa, sin ...


3

You need to use the definite article when you are referring to abstract beings or entities, in a general meaning (See this related question). La paciencia es una virtud La valentía vive aquí La libertad es una estado de la mente El amor nunca muere. Obviously the definite article wouldn't matter for the graphical representation, but if ...


3

Because if what's next to the "ir a" is a noun then that noun must be accompanied by the corresponding definite article and the noun. You can also use the contraction "al" instead of "a el" when the noun is masculine. So this could be written as: Ana y yo vamos a ir al bar. Ana y yo vamos a ir a el bar. × Ana y yo vamos a ir a bar (No definite ...


2

You are right, most times an article is used before the noun with the exception of personal pronouns and a few more things. "La chica" "El país" are right "La María" "El México" are definitely wrong, it even sounds wrong. For personal pronouns you only use the proper noun. "Maria" "México" When the noun is use in definitive/undefinitive sense: "Las ...


2

As others have said, al = a+el in all senses. However, do not under any circumstances use it in a proper noun, like El Paso, where the artículo definido is a part of the name. (x ) Voy Al Paso, Texas. (✓) Voy a El Paso, Texas. However, some countries require a artículo definido, when it is not part of the name. Voy a la India. Voy al ...


2

This is a working answer — there will be updates to it (I'll remove this when I think it's done). Throughout this, I use the standard asterisk in front of a statement that is not grammatical. 1. What is a determiner? A determiner is a word that goes with a noun let's us know which, if any, (out of all of those nouns in the whole of existance), we're ...


2

El verbo haber no admite sustantivos definidos por las razones que ha indicado Rodrigo. Cabe notar que la misma restricción existe en inglés aunque es difícil notarla porque, a pesar de usar las mismas palabras, al cambiar de indefinido a definido, estas palabras tienen funciones diferentes, evidentes al traducir al español: There are some mountains (hay ...


1

I think is easier to start explaining with Él odia al hombre con el cual estaba yo hablando. You probably already know that "al" is equivalent to "a el". You could have said (although it sounds worse) Él odia a el hombre con el cual estaba yo hablando. You would have never said "Él odia a hombre", but "Él odia a el hombre", because you need the ...


1

Definitively, you have to add articles to refer to abstract beings as subjects. In addition to previous answers, I'd like to add that a phrase like "La Valentía vive aquí" seems a bit odd, I'd go for a expression like: "El lugar donde vive la Valentía" Here you change your subject from Valentía to aquí ("El lugar" --> aquí) giving more emphasis to the ...


1

Casa de Fruta seems a bit ugly to me; I think it should be Casa de la Fruta. The meaning of de here does not express ownership, but material. ¿De quién es la casa? La casa es de la fruta. Who owns the house? The fruit owns the house. ¿De qué está hecha la casa? La casa está hecha de fruta. What's the house made of? The house is made of fruit. If we use de ...


1

indefinite articles (un, una) are used only before modified nouns, that is nouns followed by adjectives. I think that this is not true. A modified noun with "una": una casa roja (=a red house) An unmodified noun with "una": una casa (=a house) Both sentences are perfectly valid in Spanish. And, regarding modified and unmodified nouns, definite ...


1

Depends a lot in the country you're writting. South American countries tend to have an article in the front of the name: El Perú La Argentina El Ecuador El Brasil And some asian countries have an article as well: La China El Japón La India It's opcional in all cases but it's very common to hear them with the article ...


1

When you use a definite article (the), you are doing exactly what the article is described to do; DEFINE. I look at the chair / Miro la silla vs I look at a chair / Miro una silla The second sentence suggests that there is more than one chair, while the first sentence defines a particular chair. Typically, when you use a definite article you will also ...


1

Aquí es donde la morfología entra en acción morph(del griego forma) y logía (ciencia) Definición de morfología por la RAE: Parte de la gramática que se ocupa de la estructura de las palabras. Así pues morfología de los determinantes sería correcto: Determinante: Se suele llamar determinante a una función sintáctica desempeñada por diversos tipos de ...


1

I think, in this case, you can ommit the article. As MikMik says, it's common in Spain use the article when you mention a restaurant: Ayer cené en el Fridays - Ayer cené en el [restaurante] Fridays If you mention the restaurant as a space, colloquially you usually will hear: Que opinas del [restaurante] Fridays? But, if you are mentioning the ...



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