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17

C is never silent. 'c' has three sounds. When combined with 'h' it creates the digraph 'ch' with the same sound as english 'chair' ('choza'). When followed by 'a', 'o' or 'u' or by another consonant it has the 'k' sound ('casa', 'cobre', 'ósculo', 'actor'). When followed by 'e' or 'i' it has the 'z' sound ('cereza', 'ciruela'). Your problem arises with ...


17

That kind of sentences which uses a every letter of the alphabet at least once are called pangrams (in Spanish "pangrama") or holoalphabetic sentence (in Spanish "frase holoalfabética"). There is even a wikipedia entry about them. In that entry you can find these examples: Cada vez que trabajo, Félix me paga un whisky (36 letters) (Ñ is missing) ...


7

The Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas (see translation to English by Google) claims that the RAE has not considered rr a single letter at least since 1803. There is an entire article explaining the letter r (translation to English) but the most relevant fact is: La letra r, duplicada, forma el dígrafo rr Which means The letter r, duplicated, is ...


4

While I don't have an authoritative source, these two facts seem to suggest rr was never a single letter: When learning the alphabet, we used to include ch and ll in the sequence, but not rr The "Traditional Spanish" database collation considers ch and ll when sorting, but not rr


2

I would add something to @Envite answer (I can't comment): In spanish the sound it's more important than the way of writing (always respecting the orthografy). This means that if a word changes you have to update the way you write it. Also, the 'z' before 'i' and 'e' it's almost forbbiden, it turns into 'c', except for very few words for ethimological ...


2

I think you're talking about the NATO phonetic alphabet used for radio communications. In this website they say they it is used with the English words though numbers may be translated to local language. Also there are equivalent spelling alphabets in other languages: you can read them here. So for Spanish it would start with Antonio, Barcelona, Carmen, ...


2

I once had the opportunity to visit a navigation control center and they gave me a card with the phonetic alphabet they used and it was pretty much the same as NATO phonetic alphabet. I guess (and hope) that for those kinds of official and international things there is some kind of standard. For the everyday use, we use names of cities, provinces, ...


2

I don't know is there is an official "phonetic alphabet" but what I hear most (in Spain) are names of cities and countries, with few exceptions: Almería, Barcelona, Cáceres, dedo, Extremadura, Francia, gato, hache, Italia, Jaén...


2

For c + vowel you can memorize the standard rules: 1. ca, co, cu = ka, ko, ku 2. ce, ci = ze, zi where z is pronounced like 'th' in 'think' Now, depending on the zone you are, 'seseo' changes all cases of rule 2. into 2. ce, ci = se, si


1

The obvious explanation is that words cannot begin with 'rr'. In older encyclopedias you would search chino or llama in the Ch and Ll chapters, but now they are listed in the C and L chapters instead. In other words, Ch and Ll were considered letters and had their own chapters, but rr couldn't have its own chapter and perhaps partly because of that it did ...



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