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La excepción es el verano, para el resto es +al Otoñal, invernal y primaveral, inclusive estival de estío.


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Otoñal e invernal. Para el verano también se usa estival. Edición: Encontré estos cultismos (palabras apegadas al origen etimológico, en este caso al latín): Para el verano: estival Para la primavera : vernal (qué curioso) Para el invierno: hibernal Son palabras del español que se pueden encontrar en escritos antiguos, están en desuso. Pero "hibernal" ...


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Actually I can't comment but as a spanish I can tell, you can say "machota", sounds weird even for me.Is more like a suburban word, but actually RAE have it. http://buscon.rae.es/drae/srv/search?val=machota It's saying a woman its kind of tomboy/ not very "femenine" or you can even say it like "you are very strong". ¡Qué machota eres! But I never ...


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Acute nouns ending in -n and -s are adding a feminine -a, except for "barón" (fem: "baronesa") and "edecán" and "rehén" (used for both genders). To form the feminine of adjectives ending in -or, ol, -ón, -án, -ín and -és, is added -a to each, except for "cortés". The correct feminine: ¡Eres una patana!


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patán. (De pata). m. coloq. Aldeano rústico. m. coloq. Hombre zafio y tosco. U. t. c. adj. This word can't be used on women, it is only for men. Using it with women it could sound as a joke, so saying: ¡Eres una patana! ¡Eres una patán! Is the same thing for me, since feminine form doesn't exist you can play with the ...


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Patán is a masculine form, according to the RAE. It is a noun that can be used as an adjetive. The article must agree with number and gender (so una patán is incorrect). The correct form, according to this source would be: Ella es una patana. What I can't tell you is up to which point you can use that adjetive (or noun) to refer to a woman. Sounds to ...



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